Su Xinqi

Su Xinqi

Reporter, Hong Kong

Xinqi is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a City desk news reporter at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong-mainland relations
British consulate employee from Hong Kong detained in mainland China
China’s foreign ministry said an employee of the British consulate in Hong Kong had been detained in mainland China.  Hong Kong resident Simon Cheng Man-kit, 28, lost touch with his family on August 8 while returning home from a business trip to Shenzhen, according to his girlfriend.  The reason for detention was not given. In Hong Kong, his disappearance has prompted concerns that it was somehow related to the ongoing anti-government protests. On Wednesday, China’s foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Cheng had been given a 15-day administrative detention for violating China’s public security laws, without giving details.  Geng said Cheng was a Chinese citizen and that the case was e
The inside story of how Hong Kong activists stormed parliament
For the past three weeks, multiple protests against a now-suspended extradition bill have roiled Hong Kong. Inkstone has previously reported on how the mostly young demonstrators rest, eat and pee. And how the leaderless movement organized themselves. On the evening of July 1, the 22nd anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese rule, a much smaller group of more radical activists shocked the world by charging into and ransacking the city’s legislature to express their grievances toward the authorities. But how was this unprecedented protest organized?  Here’s an inside account of what happened that day, pieced together according to interviews and on-the-ground observations by reporters fro
Law professor suspended after openly criticizing China’s president
A law professor at China’s prestigious Tsinghua University who openly criticized Chinese President Xi Jinping has been suspended by the university, according to one of his colleagues and several academics familiar with the situation. Xu Zhangrun, 56, was suspended this month after he wrote several articles criticizing Beijing over political and social issues, his colleague Guo Yuhua, a sociology professor at the university, told the South China Morning Post. In one opinion piece last year, Xu questioned the personality cult surrounding Xi and the decision by China’s parliament to scrap the term limit on the Chinese presidency. The article, and others written by Xu critical of the president,
Hong Kong arts center reverses decision on dissident Chinese writer
In a surprise twist, a Hong Kong arts center has reversed a controversial decision on celebrated Chinese dissident writer Ma Jian, agreeing to host him. Ma, who is visiting from Britain, will now headline two events on Saturday at Tai Kwun, a brand new arts complex and heritage center, as part of the Hong Kong International Literary Festival.  "The principles of free speech and cultural expression are central to our mission as an international literary festival. We apologise for the uncertainty over the past few days," the festival tweeted. Ma will be introducing his new work, China Dream, which is a satire taking aim at Chinese President Xi Jinping’s use of the phrase in state propaganda.
Hong Kong subway blames rogue computers for morning chaos
Hong Kong’s subway system is a people-moving marvel. Every day it racks up 5.8 million rides, about half of all trips made daily on public transport in the city of 7 million people. It’s more profitable than any other subway system in the world, and literally 99.9% of its trains run on time. When cities build a modern train network, Hong Kong is often where they send people on a pilgrimage. (Not to take a dig at New York City, again, but in comparison New York’s subway trains are on time about 60% of the time.) But a six-hour service disruption on Tuesday has shaken the Hong Kong subway operator’s reputation and thrown all these superlatives into question. It was done by the computers Tony L
Family feud fuels rare shooting spree in Hong Kong
Hong Kong has been rocked by its first shooting in years, in a family dispute turned daylight murder in a Hong Kong park. In a city with stringent gun control laws, shootings are almost unheard-of. But Ada Tsim Sum-kit, a 44-year-old bodyguard, allegedly shot dead an elderly aunt and uncle and wounded two other relatives during a family meeting on Tuesday afternoon. She had arranged to meet her aunts and uncles, all aged between 60 and 80, in the public park to settle a dispute over her grandmother’s inheritance, which was a $1 million apartment. When the meeting broke up without agreement shortly before 3pm, the woman is said to have pulled out what is believed to be a semi-automatic Beret