Sum Lok-kei

Sum Lok-kei

Reporter, Hong Kong

Lok-kei is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong politics
Bracing for clashes: Hong Kong protesters turn college campus into fortress
Visitors and staff trying to enter a university in Hong Kong that was the site of a fiery battle between protesters and police this week have encountered a makeshift checkpoint. Protesters wearing black who guard the booth – made of bamboo sticks, umbrellas and a door from a trashed car – have roughly searched through any visitor belongings and questioned the purpose of their visit to the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) in Sha Tin. A plank at the checkpoint has the words “CU arrival” scrawled on it. The protesters claimed their intention was to prevent plain-clothes police officers from getting onto the campus, but it has resulted in many people, especially university staff, feeling d
Bracing for clashes: Hong Kong protesters turn college campus into fortress
Tear gas fired at Hong Kong college campuses for first time
Police in Hong Kong have fired tear gas on university campuses for the first time as they battled protesters, sometimes for hours. One local institution, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, was turned into a smoking battlefield where student protesters and officers were locked in a tense stand-off for seven hours on Monday. Clashes resumed on Tuesday. A widespread traffic disruption caused by anti-government protesters calling for a citywide strike prompted 11 universities to cancel classes on Monday. All but one of them suspended classes on Tuesday. Students have often been at the forefront of the ongoing anti-government protests, which began on June 9. On Monday morning, police entered th
Tear gas fired at Hong Kong college campuses for first time
Is Bruce Lee the father of mixed martial arts?
Bruce Lee wasn't just an actor and kungfu master, he founded his own hybrid philosophy of martial arts called Jeet Kune Do. Tragically, Lee died in Hong Kong at the age of 32 from cerebral edema on July 20, 1973, the same year his film Enter the Dragon was released posthumously.  The action film would go on to become a smash box-office hit that sparked worldwide interest in martial arts.  Following Lee’s death, combat sports grew in popularity around the world. While most people credit the US with inventing mixed martial arts, a growing number of Lee's fans are supporting the claim that Bruce Lee is the true creator of MMA.
Is Bruce Lee the father of mixed martial arts?
Teenage protester shot by Hong Kong police in stable condition
An 18-year-old high school student was in a stable condition on Wednesday after becoming the first protester to be shot with a live round by police over the nearly four months of anti-government demonstrations. The teenager was hospitalized and underwent an operation to have the bullet removed from his chest after an officer fired on him during a clash in the northern district of Tsuen Wan on October 1, China’s National Day. The shooting marked an escalation in a protest movement demanding greater accountability and democracy in the former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule in 1997 under the promise of wide-ranging civil liberties and, eventually, democratic elections. On Tuesda
Teenage protester shot by Hong Kong police in stable condition
Grilling Carrie Lam: few expectations and even fewer new answers
I left Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s first town-hall style dialogue session feeling pretty much the same I did on the way in – underwhelmed. This was an opportunity for me to swap my journalist hat for that of a regular citizen of Hong Kong and take part in Lam’s first dialogue with the public in more than three months of anti-government protests. Applications for the event opened last Thursday, and 150 people were randomly picked from more than 20,200 who signed up for a chance to demand answers from Lam. A friend who knew I was among those selected told me that I should come up with questions that would not allow Lam to get away with old answers. As I walked into the heavily guarded venue
Grilling Carrie Lam: few expectations and even fewer new answers
Some Hong Kong protesters want to take matters into their own hands
The growing use of force by anti-government protesters in Hong Kong took a new turn over the past weekend, with vigilantism being advocated as a way to tackle clashes with rival groups.  The calls for “resolving things privately” – or si liu in Cantonese – threaten to deepen the worst political crisis to hit the former British colony since it returned to Chinese rule in 1997. Supporters advocate physical retaliation against aggressive groups rather than retreating or asking police – whom many view as their enemy – to mediate and enforce the law. Such calls intensified on Saturday after a group of men wearing blue T-shirts with the slogan “I love police” and holding Chinese national flags bea
Some Hong Kong protesters want to take matters into their own hands
After protests, sticky notes take over Hong Kong streets
They sprang up seemingly overnight: on footbridges, in pedestrian underpasses and at bus stops. They took over walls, storefronts and construction site fencing. When damaged, they regenerated. Neighborhoods across Hong Kong are covered in colorful Post-it notes in support of a series of protests against a contentious – and now declared “dead” – government plan that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China.  The walls of messages, known here as Lennon Walls, have emerged as a potent symbol of defiance against perceived attempts to blur the line between the highly autonomous Chinese city and the mainland.  The former British colony returned to Chinese rule under the promise that it w
After protests, sticky notes take over Hong Kong streets
Hong Kong leader says extradition bill is ‘dead’
After a month of major protests roiled Hong Kong, the city’s top leader Carrie Lam has declared a controversial extradition bill “dead.” Lam, the chief executive, acknowledged at a press conference that the government’s work in amending the law was a “complete failure.” She addressed lingering doubts that the government could restart the amendment process. “There is no such plan, the bill is dead,” Lam said. Earlier, she had said the bill “will die” in 2020. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong to transfer suspects to jurisdictions it currently lacks extradition agreements with, including mainland China. Critics feared it would remove the legal firewall between the city and the mainland, e
Hong Kong leader says extradition bill is ‘dead’
The inside story of how Hong Kong activists stormed parliament
For the past three weeks, multiple protests against a now-suspended extradition bill have roiled Hong Kong. Inkstone has previously reported on how the mostly young demonstrators rest, eat and pee. And how the leaderless movement organized themselves. On the evening of July 1, the 22nd anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese rule, a much smaller group of more radical activists shocked the world by charging into and ransacking the city’s legislature to express their grievances toward the authorities. But how was this unprecedented protest organized?  Here’s an inside account of what happened that day, pieced together according to interviews and on-the-ground observations by reporters fro
The inside story of how Hong Kong activists stormed parliament
Will another ‘sorry’ calm Hong Kong?
It was seen as her last chance to stop a snowballing political storm. But other than an apology, Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam offered little of substance at a press conference on Tuesday. It was the third time in four days that Lam sought to pacify a large swath of the city’s population, after she pulled the brakes on a bill seen as blurring the lines between the semi-autonomous region’s independent judiciary and mainland China’s government-controlled courts.  March organizers said 2 million people took part in a protest on Sunday to demand the bill’s withdrawal and Lam’s resignation. That evening, she issued a statement apologizing for “disappointing many citizens.” The bill, if pushed thr
Will another ‘sorry’ calm Hong Kong?