Susan Jung

Susan Jung

Editor, Food and Drinks

Susan Jung trained as a pastry chef and worked in hotels, restaurants and bakeries in San Francisco, New York and Hong Kong before joining the Post. She is academy chair for Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwa

n for the World's 50 Best Restaurants and Asia's 50 Best Restaurants.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English
Areas of Expertise
Cooking, eating
Cooking tips from a Chinese stir-fry guru
Grace Young, a chef and award-winning author, grew up idolizing legendary French chef Julia Child, but it’s her love of Chinese cooking that has helped catapult her to fame across Asia and the US. She is on a mission is to demystify Chinese cooking and to take the art of stir-frying to the masses.  “The power and wisdom of Chinese cooking go far beyond simply mastering the more complex cooking techniques or even knowing the ingredients,” said Young, who grew up in San Francisco.  “For me, the principles that govern Chinese cooking and nutrition are far more intriguing than the Western notions of nutrition, with its focus on cholesterol, vitamins, minerals, fiber, carbohydrates, proteins, and
How to make a uniquely Asian fried chicken sandwich
There is nothing quite like a good fried chicken sandwich and this recipe includes a fantastic Acar slaw, a Southeast Asian dish, to add some diversity to every bite.  The marinade for these fried chicken sandwiches couldn’t be easier, but the slaw takes a little work.  While traditional cooks would use a mortar and pestle to pound the mixture of spices, it’s much easier to grind them in a high-speed blender. Sambal belacan and coconut milk fried chicken sandwiches with acar slaw Belacan comes in hard, dry blocks, or in jars, where it is more moist.  For this recipe, use the dry version. The sambal belacan can be home-made or purchased in jars. Candlenuts can be difficult to source – look i
Here’s how to cook perfect rice every time
Cooking rice should be easy. Rice is a staple for billions of people around the world, and humans have been eating it for millennia. In China alone, more than 156 million tons of rice were consumed in the last year. That’s around three to four bowls, on average, eaten by each person per day. But when it comes to cooking perfect rice every time, many of us are still confused. There are so many cooking options and grain choices out there. One myth is that you need an electric rice cooker. While these nifty appliances dating from the 1950s make the cooking process a whole lot easier, they aren’t essential. Enamelled cast iron pots were found to be the best cooking vessel outside of electric ric