Thomas Yau

Thomas Yau

Video Producer

Thomas Yau is a contributor to Inkstone and a video journalist at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Shanghai
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese, Hokkien
Areas of Expertise
Video Production
Tear gas, petrol bombs and mass arrests in Hong Kong
Downtown Hong Kong descended into chaos on Sunday as anti-government demonstrations entered their 17th straight week. Violent clashes took place two days before the People’s Republic of China marks 70 years since its founding. More protests are expected before and during the anniversary.
Tear gas, petrol bombs and mass arrests in Hong Kong
Police fire shot, water cannons in Hong Kong protests
For the first time in 12 weekends of anti-government protests in Hong Kong, a police officer fired a warning shot during clashes with demonstrators on Sunday. Earlier in the day, police also deployed water cannons for the first time, threatening to use them in order to disperse hundreds of protesters who had occupied a road following a march.
Police fire shot, water cannons in Hong Kong protests
Medieval ‘knights’ in China are going to war
Hacking at each other armed with swords and shields in full medieval armor may seem like a job for stunt actors. But in China, dozens of enthusiasts are suiting up for exhausting bouts in the hope of finding international success in medieval combat. Watch the video above.
Medieval ‘knights’ in China are going to war
Cherry blossoms in Shanghai
Cherry trees are blossoming around Shanghai, charming park visitors as the eastern Chinese metropolis welcomes the arrival of spring. Check out our video, above, for more.
Cherry blossoms in Shanghai
This company wants to make money from China’s social credit system
China is developing a controversial social credit system of rewards and punishments meant to encourage people and businesses to abide by rules and to promote integrity and trustworthiness in society at large. The government aims to have it in place by 2020, and so far its most visible applications include a ban on people from booking express trains or flights if they appear on various “blacklists”. While there are still many questions about how the system will be implemented, at least one company is setting its sights on making money out of social credit. Check out our video, above, for more.
This company wants to make money from China’s social credit system
A historic Shanghai neighborhood counts down its final days
Behind the towering modern skyscrapers of Shanghai, some older corners of the city still remain. The Laoximen neighborhood is one of the city’s oldest. Once the location of the west gate of the former walled city, the area’s history dates back 500 years. It’s home to some of the final remaining examples of colonial buildings built when Shanghai was one of the only places in China where foreigners were permitted to trade. But urban redevelopment has steadily chipped away at Laoximen, with the latest plans poised to erase the northern part of the neighborhood. Watch the video, above, for a taste of old Shanghai.
A historic Shanghai neighborhood counts down its final days
Cringe with us at China’s parliamentary propaganda rap
Chinese state news agency Xinhua has published an English-language propaganda rap video all about the “two sessions” – the country’s annual parliamentary meetings. Performed by rapper Su Han, who rose to fame in popular reality show Sing! China, the video celebrates China’s recent developments, including its landing on the far side of the moon, its battles against pollution and poverty, and its greening campaign. While hip hop culture and propaganda don’t seem like natural bedfellows, in recent years the government has increasingly been making use of rap to sell its message. Check out our video, above, for a taste. Interested in in-depth analysis and news from the Two Sessions? Check out the
Cringe with us at China’s parliamentary propaganda rap
The Chinese megastar singer who doesn’t exist
In a Shanghai stadium on Saturday, thousands of screaming fans gathered with their arms outstretched, reaching towards their idol. But there was no megastar to touch. They were there to see Luo Tianyi, China’s most famous virtual singer. Virtual stars were first created in the 1990s in Japan. Luo Tianyi was created in 2012, the first of her kind in China. Now she thrives thanks to concerts, lucrative advertising contracts… and fans who create her songs for her. The country’s virtual idol industry, valued at a little less than $14 million last year, is expected to grow to about $220 million by 2023, according to consulting firm Newsijie. Check out our video, above, to find out more about this
The Chinese megastar singer who doesn’t exist
China’s Hollywood is feeling the squeeze
China’s film market is massive: film-goers spent $88.7 billion at Chinese cinemas in 2018. And its own massive version of Hollywood, called Hengdian World Studios in eastern China, is responsible for producing films for China’s millions of cinephiles.  The 2,500-acre film studios are so large that they’re home to a full-sized replica of Beijing’s famous Forbidden City. The set is in hot demand to film Chinese period dramas, like last year’s hit series Story of Yanxi Palace.  But China's film industry is being squeezed by new government regulations that limit screen time for actors and cap their salaries. The biggest scare for actors came when China’s biggest star Fan Bingbing was detained an
China’s Hollywood is feeling the squeeze
How to furnish a home from a smartphone in China
Online shopping has grown so big in China that everything is just a click away. Electronics, home goods and even live animals can all be bought just with a few taps on a smartphone. Thomas Yau, a South China Morning Post reporter who has just moved to Shanghai, wants to do just that. Together with his colleague Rachel Cheung, he sets out to transform his spartan apartment into a luxe pad – using only his smartphone. Check out the video, above, to see how he did.
How to furnish a home from a smartphone in China