Tony Cheung

Tony Cheung

Correspondent, Hong Kong

Tony is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a ​senior political reporter with the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong-mainland relations, Hong Kong constitutional and legislative issues, political analysis
China’s security law in Hong Kong: What you need to know
A controversial national security law concerning Hong Kong is expected to be on the agenda as China’s rubber-stamp legislative body, the National People’s Congress, began its most important annual meeting on Friday.  The law would ban all seditious activities aimed at toppling the central government and external interference in the city’s affairs, as well as target terrorist acts in Hong Kong. Beijing’s plan to make the law was announced less than a year after a proposal to allow extraditions from Hong Kong to mainland China sparked months of street unrest. Chinese officials have blamed foreign interference for fueling the protests. Critics of the expected legislation, including Hong Kong’s
Hong Kong’s protests look like they’re coming back
Hong Kong’s protest leaders have vowed to return to the city’s streets after the arrest of 15 leading opposition figures amid new claims that Beijing was interfering in the city’s internal affairs. The 15 were accused of organizing and taking part in unauthorized marches in August and October last year as part of a wave of anti-government demonstrations that swept the city, initially triggered by a now-withdrawn extradition bill. Their supporters said the arrests were meant to silence dissent and are worried the authorities are hardening their stance, but pro-Beijing figures countered that the police were only doing their job and were not acting politically. Those arrested were former lawmak
Hongkongers say they have themselves to thank for curbing coronavirus
Most people in Hong Kong said they would credit themselves rather than the government for containing the coronavirus in the densely-populated city, a survey commissioned by the South China Morning Post has found. Hong Kong, which borders the mainland Chinese city of Shenzhen, has so far managed to limit the spread of the virus, a success that local epidemiologists have attributed to early social distancing practices, improved personal hygiene and the nearly universal use of face masks. Out of nearly 850 people polled, seven in 10 said they would credit the community response for beating the coronavirus, while more than half objected to the idea of the government being commended for it. The
Facing public outrage, Hong Kong police are looking to retire in mainland China
An option for Hong Kong police officers and civil servants to retire in a “Hong Kong town” in a nearby mainland Chinese city is attracting keen interest.  Lam Chi-wai, chairman of the Junior Police Officers’ Association, the largest group in the force, said on Thursday that it was in talks with Guangzhou-based developer Agile Group about buying such homes in the city of Zhaoqin in Guangdong province.  While Lam said the scheme had nothing to do with the mass protests in Hong Kong, the idea is gaining popularity among officers facing a massive public backlash in their home city.  The anti-government unrest in Hong Kong has prompted strong public anger toward the police, as protesters accuse o
Hong Kong to ban masks at protests
Hong Kong’s embattled government is about to ban people from wearing masks at protests, sources have told the South China Morning Post. Officials are planning to announce the ban on Friday through legislation under a tough colonial-era emergency law in an attempt to curb street violence during anti-government protests that have been continuing for nearly four months. The move comes amid rising tension between the police and demonstrators after an officer shot an 18-year-old student during a clash.  While the police defended the act as self-defense, supporters of the protest movement said the shooting was unnecessary and have vowed to escalate their campaign for accountability and democracy.
Hong Kong leader says she’s never offered to resign
Hong Kong’s embattled leader says she has never offered to resign, a day after an audio recording surfaced in which she is heard saying she would quit if she could. In the leaked recording, published by Reuters on Monday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam apparently said in a closed-door meeting that she would step down if she could, for causing “unforgivable havoc” to the protest-hit city. But speaking to press on Tuesday morning, Lam said she never offered to resign and rejected suggestions that Beijing had stopped her from doing so.  “I have never tendered a resignation to the central people’s government,” she said. “I have not even contemplated discussing resignation with the central people’s g
Hong Kong protest organizer attacked with baseball bats
An organizer of some of the largest anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong’s history was attacked on Thursday. Jimmy Sham, the convener of the Civil Human Rights Front, and his assistant were hit by two masked men with baseball bats in a restaurant. The assault came on the eve of planned protests on Saturday demanding freer elections of the leader and legislature of the former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule under an arrangement called “one country, two systems.” Increasingly concerned that the political firewall between Beijing and Hong Kong is being eroded, a generation of young people has taken to the streets to take part in what they consider to be a fight to preserve
Can Hong Kong stay part of China’s own Silicon Valley plan?
August and September are usually busy months for clothing trader Michael Hui Wah-kit, whose international clients arrive in Hong Kong for fashion shows and trade events. Buyers from Australia and Europe come to him for the latest casual wear produced by his suppliers on the Chinese mainland and in Southeast Asia. This year, two long-time clients decided not to come, put off by the ongoing anti-government protests in Hong Kong. They might go online and order directly from the manufacturers. Hong Kong entrepreneurs with factories in Guangdong province say their customers have been affected too. Dennis Ng Kwok-on, whose factory in Guangdong province supplies chemicals and machinery, said his cl
After protests, sticky notes take over Hong Kong streets
They sprang up seemingly overnight: on footbridges, in pedestrian underpasses and at bus stops. They took over walls, storefronts and construction site fencing. When damaged, they regenerated. Neighborhoods across Hong Kong are covered in colorful Post-it notes in support of a series of protests against a contentious – and now declared “dead” – government plan that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China.  The walls of messages, known here as Lennon Walls, have emerged as a potent symbol of defiance against perceived attempts to blur the line between the highly autonomous Chinese city and the mainland.  The former British colony returned to Chinese rule under the promise that it w
Hong Kong leader says extradition bill is ‘dead’
After a month of major protests roiled Hong Kong, the city’s top leader Carrie Lam has declared a controversial extradition bill “dead.” Lam, the chief executive, acknowledged at a press conference that the government’s work in amending the law was a “complete failure.” She addressed lingering doubts that the government could restart the amendment process. “There is no such plan, the bill is dead,” Lam said. Earlier, she had said the bill “will die” in 2020. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong to transfer suspects to jurisdictions it currently lacks extradition agreements with, including mainland China. Critics feared it would remove the legal firewall between the city and the mainland, e