Tony Cheung

Tony Cheung

Correspondent, Hong Kong

Tony is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a ​senior political reporter with the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong-mainland relations, Hong Kong constitutional and legislative issues, political analysis
Facing public outrage, Hong Kong police are looking to retire in mainland China
An option for Hong Kong police officers and civil servants to retire in a “Hong Kong town” in a nearby mainland Chinese city is attracting keen interest.  Lam Chi-wai, chairman of the Junior Police Officers’ Association, the largest group in the force, said on Thursday that it was in talks with Guangzhou-based developer Agile Group about buying such homes in the city of Zhaoqin in Guangdong province.  While Lam said the scheme had nothing to do with the mass protests in Hong Kong, the idea is gaining popularity among officers facing a massive public backlash in their home city.  The anti-government unrest in Hong Kong has prompted strong public anger toward the police, as protesters accuse o
Facing public outrage, Hong Kong police are looking to retire in mainland China
Hong Kong to ban masks at protests
Hong Kong’s embattled government is about to ban people from wearing masks at protests, sources have told the South China Morning Post. Officials are planning to announce the ban on Friday through legislation under a tough colonial-era emergency law in an attempt to curb street violence during anti-government protests that have been continuing for nearly four months. The move comes amid rising tension between the police and demonstrators after an officer shot an 18-year-old student during a clash.  While the police defended the act as self-defense, supporters of the protest movement said the shooting was unnecessary and have vowed to escalate their campaign for accountability and democracy.
Hong Kong to ban masks at protests
Hong Kong leader says she’s never offered to resign
Hong Kong’s embattled leader says she has never offered to resign, a day after an audio recording surfaced in which she is heard saying she would quit if she could. In the leaked recording, published by Reuters on Monday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam apparently said in a closed-door meeting that she would step down if she could, for causing “unforgivable havoc” to the protest-hit city. But speaking to press on Tuesday morning, Lam said she never offered to resign and rejected suggestions that Beijing had stopped her from doing so.  “I have never tendered a resignation to the central people’s government,” she said. “I have not even contemplated discussing resignation with the central people’s g
Hong Kong leader says she’s never offered to resign
Hong Kong protest organizer attacked with baseball bats
An organizer of some of the largest anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong’s history was attacked on Thursday. Jimmy Sham, the convener of the Civil Human Rights Front, and his assistant were hit by two masked men with baseball bats in a restaurant. The assault came on the eve of planned protests on Saturday demanding freer elections of the leader and legislature of the former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule under an arrangement called “one country, two systems.” Increasingly concerned that the political firewall between Beijing and Hong Kong is being eroded, a generation of young people has taken to the streets to take part in what they consider to be a fight to preserve
Hong Kong protest organizer attacked with baseball bats
Can Hong Kong stay part of China’s own Silicon Valley plan?
August and September are usually busy months for clothing trader Michael Hui Wah-kit, whose international clients arrive in Hong Kong for fashion shows and trade events. Buyers from Australia and Europe come to him for the latest casual wear produced by his suppliers on the Chinese mainland and in Southeast Asia. This year, two long-time clients decided not to come, put off by the ongoing anti-government protests in Hong Kong. They might go online and order directly from the manufacturers. Hong Kong entrepreneurs with factories in Guangdong province say their customers have been affected too. Dennis Ng Kwok-on, whose factory in Guangdong province supplies chemicals and machinery, said his cl
Can Hong Kong stay part of China’s own Silicon Valley plan?
After protests, sticky notes take over Hong Kong streets
They sprang up seemingly overnight: on footbridges, in pedestrian underpasses and at bus stops. They took over walls, storefronts and construction site fencing. When damaged, they regenerated. Neighborhoods across Hong Kong are covered in colorful Post-it notes in support of a series of protests against a contentious – and now declared “dead” – government plan that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China.  The walls of messages, known here as Lennon Walls, have emerged as a potent symbol of defiance against perceived attempts to blur the line between the highly autonomous Chinese city and the mainland.  The former British colony returned to Chinese rule under the promise that it w
After protests, sticky notes take over Hong Kong streets
Hong Kong leader says extradition bill is ‘dead’
After a month of major protests roiled Hong Kong, the city’s top leader Carrie Lam has declared a controversial extradition bill “dead.” Lam, the chief executive, acknowledged at a press conference that the government’s work in amending the law was a “complete failure.” She addressed lingering doubts that the government could restart the amendment process. “There is no such plan, the bill is dead,” Lam said. Earlier, she had said the bill “will die” in 2020. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong to transfer suspects to jurisdictions it currently lacks extradition agreements with, including mainland China. Critics feared it would remove the legal firewall between the city and the mainland, e
Hong Kong leader says extradition bill is ‘dead’
4 years on, Hong Kong resistance movement founders go on trial
Nine key figures from Hong Kong’s massive Occupy protests in 2014 have pleaded not guilty to public nuisance charges, for their part in the civil disobedience movement for universal suffrage that shut down parts of the city for 79 days. The nine – including the movement’s three co-founders – chanted thundering slogans with hundreds of their supporters on Monday ahead of the trial. “We want true universal suffrage,” they yelled in unison, with an intensity that shook West Kowloon Court, where the nine are set to appear. The three co-founders – academics Benny Tai Yiu-ting and Dr Chan Kin-man, and Reverend Chu Yiu-ming – face one count of conspiracy to cause public nuisance, inciting others t
4 years on, Hong Kong resistance movement founders go on trial
Hong Kong arts center reverses decision on dissident Chinese writer
In a surprise twist, a Hong Kong arts center has reversed a controversial decision on celebrated Chinese dissident writer Ma Jian, agreeing to host him. Ma, who is visiting from Britain, will now headline two events on Saturday at Tai Kwun, a brand new arts complex and heritage center, as part of the Hong Kong International Literary Festival.  "The principles of free speech and cultural expression are central to our mission as an international literary festival. We apologise for the uncertainty over the past few days," the festival tweeted. Ma will be introducing his new work, China Dream, which is a satire taking aim at Chinese President Xi Jinping’s use of the phrase in state propaganda.
Hong Kong arts center reverses decision on dissident Chinese writer
Thousands in Hong Kong rally against $64 billion islands
Thousands of Hongkongers have taken to the streets to protest against a controversial proposal to spend up to $64 billion to build an artificial chain of islands in the middle of the sea. At the peak of the Sunday rally, police estimated that 5,800 demonstrators took part. Some held signs and banners in the shape of white elephants, which is what they believe the project will be, while others dismissed the proposal as “outright robbery”. The scheme was proposed by Hong Kong’s top leader, Carrie Lam, during her annual policy address last week. At that price, the project would be much more pricier than the Palm Jumeirah, an artificial archipelago in Dubai that reportedly cost an estimated $12
Thousands in Hong Kong rally against $64 billion islands