Tracy Qu

Tracy Qu

Tracy Qu is a Hong-Kong based technology reporter at the Post. She graduated from the University of Hong Kong with a master’s degree in journalism.

Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
China technology
More people downloaded this Chinese app than Facebook
TikTok, the Chinese-owned short video platform popular among American teens, and Douyin, the domestic version of the service, became the world’s second-most downloaded app last year, according to market analyst Sensor Tower. TikTok and Douyin amassed a combined 740 million downloads last year, overtaking Facebook and Messenger, trailing only WhatsApp (which, like the Messenger app, is also owned by Facebook). As one of the rare Chinese-owned services that took off overseas, TikTok’s rise in the US has been met with pressure from lawmakers over national security concerns and alleged censorship.  The scrutiny has come at a time of mounting skepticism in Washington over China’s rising global in
More people downloaded this Chinese app than Facebook
To go viral in China, creativity may be pointless
Can virality be taught? The more than 20 people gathered in a room in Shenzhen, in China’s southern Guangdong province, certainly think so.  Some have forked out as much as $1,400 for a weekend crash course on how to create short, funny videos that will get lots of views on Douyin, ByteDance’s Chinese version of its short-video app TikTok. Lots of clicks lead to potential advertising endorsements, or so the equation goes. Zhang Bo, a moon-faced man in his late 30s, is the man who promises to unlock the secrets of creating crazy popular videos.  Perched on a white table at the front of the class, Zhang regaled us with how one client made over $10.1 million in just three days following his met
To go viral in China, creativity may be pointless
TikTok boss hopes DC visit can ease censorship and privacy concerns
The Chinese-owned social media app TikTok is wildly popular in the US, especially among teenagers who spend hours posting videos about the latest dance trends, their love-life complaints and personal unique talents.  As it grows into one of the world’s most used social media platforms, TikTok has found itself under increased scrutiny in the US, its third-largest market.  In an attempt to assuage concerns over censorship and user privacy, the head of the short video platform, Alex Zhu, is embarking on a goodwill tour to Capitol Hill.  The meetings with American lawmakers, scheduled for this week, come as the video app’s Beijing-based owner ByteDance is under increasing scrutiny to address cen
 TikTok boss hopes DC visit can ease censorship and privacy concerns
Chinese residents grow nervous about facial data privacy
It took 20 minutes of arguing before the hotel in downtown Shenzhen, a tech hub in southern China, finally allowed Wang Qiyu to check in without taking a scan of his face. Wang, a software developer who returned to China two years ago after getting his doctorate in the US, said he felt harassed by the hotel.  “Airport, train stations, stores and hotels – almost every organization asks for facial data,” the 31-year-old said. “But no one tells me why they collect the data and how they protect it.” He is not alone: Chinese consumers, generally thought to be more accepting of trading privacy for security, are growing increasingly vocal about data privacy concerns as facial recognition becomes mo
Chinese residents grow nervous about facial data privacy
‘Smart’ public toilets in Shanghai limit use to 15 minutes
A fan of reading in the bathroom? You might want to avoid the high-tech public restrooms in Shanghai. The Chinese megacity has built about 150 of the so-called “smart” public toilets around town. But if you spend longer than 15 minutes inside one of the stalls, an alert will be sent to city workers to check on you. The new bathrooms are part of China’s efforts to extend artificial intelligence (AI) into almost every aspect of daily life. They come hot on the heels of smart trash cans and AI-powered traffic lights. Each stall has a human body sensor, using infrared rays and ultrasound to detect the person inside and how long they have been sitting there, according to a document released by t
‘Smart’ public toilets in Shanghai limit use to 15 minutes
Searching for love, with a little help from code
Like many single women her age, 24-year-old Sunny Xu has received lots of advice from friends and family about dating. A native of the eastern city of Wenzhou, she has met a few men online — and has been let down by those who didn’t measure up to their profiles. Sounds like another day in online dating. “Some of them don’t know how to find a proper topic to start the conversation,” said Xu. “One time, someone asked why my online replies were slow – which was rude and irritating.” While online dating services offer access to massive databases of potential lovers, finding a true match seems to remain as hard as ever. But a slew of technologists have in recent years doubled down on building mat
Searching for love, with a little help from code