Wendy Wu

Wendy Wu

Reporter, China

Wendy Wu is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a Beijing-based reporter focusing on international finance and diplomacy.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Trade, diplomacy, international finance
24,000 government jobs up for grabs in China. 1.4 million people applied
Imagine taking a job test with only a 1-in-60 chance of landing the gig.  That is the reality for the Chinese public service exam, or guokao in Mandarin. More than 1.4 million people took the test on Sunday in the hopes of landing one of 24,000 available government jobs. The hotly contested annual event advertised positions from 86 central government agencies and 23 institutions directly attached to them. Successful candidates would start their positions early next year, China News reported. This year’s 1.44 million registered test-takers represented a 4% increase from last year, but fell below the 1.66 million who took the exam in 2017, the report said. The guokao has long been a big draw
24,000 government jobs up for grabs in China. 1.4 million people applied
Chinese companies dig in for a long trade war
Shanghai-based fruit importer Lucas Liu is on the front line of the US-China trade war. The cost of American cherries, for example, has risen by roughly half, prompting him to cut back on what he orders from the US. Liu, who sells American fruit to Chinese consumers, is continuing to buy from the US to maintain his long-standing relationships with his suppliers – but he is also looking elsewhere. This month he is planning a trip to Uzbekistan to assess the possibilities for cherry plantations there. “I am buying much less than last year, but I won’t stop buying from American suppliers,” he said. “Turkey, Canada and Central Asia have quickly made up the shortfall as alternative suppliers.” T
Chinese companies dig in for a long trade war
US, China close to trade truce before G20 meeting
This story is produced jointly by the South China Morning Post and POLITICO, with reporting from Asia and the United States. The world’s top two economies have tentatively agreed to a truce in their trade dispute, as they prepare for talks to resolve the conflict, according to sources familiar with the situation. Details of the deal are being prepared ahead of this weekend’s meeting between the US and Chinese presidents at the Group of 20 leaders summit in Japan, according to three sources. The agreement would avoid a round of tariffs on an additional $300 billion of Chinese imports to the US that the Trump administration had threatened. That would have extended stiff tariffs to nearly all C
US, China close to trade truce before G20 meeting
Is China threatening to use its ‘trump card’ on the US?
Chinese President Xi Jinping has visited a rare earth plant in what analysts describe as the latest show of strength, after Beijing switched to a tougher rhetoric amid the escalating trade war. China accounts for more than 90% of the global production of rare earths, a group of 17 chemical elements that are key components of high-tech and defense equipment, from laptops to electric vehicles to weapon systems. With the US relying heavily on imports from China, rare earths are among the few Chinese products the Trump administration has no plan yet to put tariffs on. On Monday, Xi visited JL Mag Rare-Earth, a major rare earths processing company in the eastern city of Ganzhou, sparking speculat
Is China threatening to use its ‘trump card’ on the US?
Steve Bannon helps revive a cold war anti-China organization
A group of Washington policy advisers and former US government officials, including former White House Chief of Staff Steve Bannon, have revived a cold war-era advocacy organization to take aim at China, which it called “an aggressive totalitarian foe.” The Committee on the Present Danger: China, or CPDC, will be launched to facilitate “public education and advocacy against the full array of conventional and non-conventional dangers” posed by the ruling Chinese Communist Party, the group said in an announcement on Monday. The committee’s latest iteration underscores the growth of opposition to Beijing in Washington’s policymaking circles, which has helped to fuel a bilateral tariff war start
Steve Bannon helps revive a cold war anti-China organization
US-China trade talks are not going very far
Talks to avert an escalation of the US-China trade war have so far failed to resolve the thorniest conflicts between the two countries. A little more than two weeks before the US is set to bump up tariffs on Chinese goods, Chinese and American trade negotiators remain far apart on key issues, sources told the South China Morning Post on Thursday. Over the course of trade talks, China has been recycling the same kinds of offers like a “broken record,” one of the sources who is familiar with the negotiations said, adding that it was a “bad record” that no one on the US side wanted to listen to. Beijing is offering only “cosmetic” offers on issues crucial to the US, such as Chinese industrial
US-China trade talks are not going very far
The legal justification behind the US-China trade war
What’s the justification for tariffs on $100 billion of Chinese imports to the US? An arcane piece of legislation, specifically Section 301 of the 1974 Trade Act. Last April, the US Trade Representative (USTR), Robert Lighthizer, produced a long report initiated under Section 301, claiming China had been engaging in unfair trade practices. China objected, saying the unilateral initiation of a trade war had no international legal basis. The report read like a charge sheet and accused the Communist Party of orchestrating an onslaught against American businesses to weaken the economic and high-tech advances enjoyed by the US. The WTO is not clear enough on these issues Craig Allen, president, U
The legal justification behind the US-China trade war
The US and China teamed up to keep nuclear material from terrorists
Back in October, President Donald Trump explicitly threatened China that he would expand the American nuclear arsenal.  But just hours later, the rivalry between two of the world’s two largest militaries took a backseat as the United States and China reportedly collaborated to remove nuclear material from Nigeria, to keep it from the hands of terrorists. Nuclear experts from the US, China, Britain and Norway, as well as Czech and Russian contractors, worked together to remove highly enriched uranium from a research reactor in Nigeria that was increasingly believed to be vulnerable to a terrorist attack, the US-based Defense News website reported this month. China played a crucial role by tra
The US and China teamed up to keep nuclear material from terrorists
Trade thaw: Trump advisor ‘impressed’ by what Xi said
The United States and China are still far apart on the fundamental differences underpinning the trade war between them. But early signs are positive that a ceasefire struck over the weekend will lead somewhere in easing trade tensions between the world’s two biggest economies. On top of stock market rallies in the US and Asia on Monday, new details have emerged from American negotiators that suggest some confidence on the Americans’ part in a resolution. In a series of tweets, President Donald Trump said his dinner meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Buenos Aires on Saturday was “an extraordinary one.” My meeting in Argentina with President Xi of China was an extraordinary one. Rel
Trade thaw: Trump advisor ‘impressed’ by what Xi said
Why Trump’s Reagan-era tariffs won’t work on China
If Donald Trump’s tariff threats against China seem familiar, it may be because of Ronald Reagan.  In the 1980s, Reagan imposed massive tariffs on Japanese cars and electronics to cut the Asian country’s trade surplus with the US. The tariffs were considered a success by American manufacturers after Japan was forced to control semiconductor prices and restrict the sale of steel and cars to the US. Trump has praised the late president’s protectionist policies and appointed former Reagan administration official Robert Lighthizer as his chief trade negotiator. When it comes to his own nemesis – China – Trump is also following Reagan’s footsteps. Last year, US launched a Section 301 Investigati
Why Trump’s Reagan-era tariffs won’t work on China