Wendy Wu

Wendy Wu

Reporter, China

Wendy Wu is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a Beijing-based reporter focusing on international finance and diplomacy.

Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Trade, diplomacy, international finance
Beijing tells troops ‘not to fire the first shot’ in South China Sea
China has told its service personnel “not to fire the first shot” as Beijing looks to de-escalate tensions with the United States in the South China Sea. Both sides have stepped up their operations in the disputed waters, increasing the risk of incidents that spiral out of control. Still, Beijing does not want to give American hawks the opportunity to escalate things further, sources familiar with the situation told the South China Morning Post. Beijing had ordered pilots and naval officers to exercise restraint in the increasingly frequent stand-offs with US planes and warships, the sources said. Meanwhile, further details emerged about a phone conversation between the two countries’ defens
Beijing says it’s not trying to unseat America as superpower
Beijing has issued its most detailed response to date to Washington’s increasingly assertive approach to countering China’s rising global influence. Days after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo vowed to confront what he called Chinese Communist Party’s “designs for hegemony,” his Chinese counterpart, Foreign Minister Wang Yi, said Beijing has no intention of unseating the United States as a superpower. “Today’s China is not the former Soviet Union. We have no intention of becoming another United States. China does not export ideology and never interferes in other countries’ internal affairs,” Wang told state news agency Xinhua in an interview on Wednesday. Wang’s remarks were Beijing’s firs
This Chinese city wants to test all 6 million residents for Covid-19
Chinese health officials announced on Sunday that they would test all residents of the northeastern city of Dalian for Covid-19 as the local authorities scrambled to control the spread of a new cluster of coronavirus infections. Dalian, a port in Liaoning province with over six million people, confirmed 12 new cases of local origin and 14 asymptomatic cases on Saturday. Dalian’s cluster of infections was first reported on Wednesday when a 58-year-old man working at a seafood processing company tested positive. Ma Xiaowei, director of the National Health Commission, led a team to Dalian on Friday night to guide the containment measures. As of Saturday, the contagion link from the city’s clus
Pick a side: Hong Kong national security law poses dilemma for foreign firms
Foreign companies operating in Hong Kong are facing a delicate decision as they digest the details of the city’s controversial new national security law: abide by the rules or support US sanctions against China for imposing the legislation. Company insiders and diplomatic sources said it was too early to assess the impact of the law on business in the financial hub. But its vague language and broad provisions have stoked fears and may result in “huge insecurity” for foreign firms – particularly a clause stating any person or organization that imposes sanctions could be punished. They said the legislation could be a wake-up call for businesses to re-evaluate their engagement with China, and i
US and China are talking again, but no consensus at diplomats’ meeting
China and the United States held diplomatic talks in Hawaii on Wednesday that exposed their divisions over a range of issues, even if there were some positive noises made in Beijing. No consensus was reached between China’s top diplomat Yang Jiechi and US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, but the two had dinner and spoke for seven hours, showing a willingness to at least prevent a further deterioration in relations, observers said. The meeting came with relations between the world’s two largest economies at their lowest point in decades and the two governments facing off on multiple fronts including technology, Hong Kong, Taiwan and the South China Sea – despite signing an interim trade deal i
Inch perfect: the team trying to fix Everest’s exact height
Chinese surveyors and climbers hope to scale the summit of Mount Everest on Wednesday in the latest attempt to measure the precise height of the world’s tallest mountain. The last such survey in 2005 fixed its height at 8,844.43 meters (29,017.2 feet), but advances in technology over the past 15 years should allow for a more precise calculation this time around. By Sunday, the 12-strong expedition team had reached a camp a little more than a mile from the summit, Chinese state news agency Xinhua said on Monday. Severe weather has scuppered two previous attempts to reach the top this month, the second of them on Friday last week. The mountain lies in the Himalayas on the border between China
China’s mask diplomacy may not be enough to save face
China’s aggressive response to criticism and its behavior during the coronavirus pandemic risk alienating the rest of the world, diplomatic advisers and observers have said. They called for Beijing to rethink its engagement with the rest of the world and warned its “mask diplomacy” – which plays up its role in providing vital supplies – risks undermining its efforts to map out a long-term role as a responsible player on the global stage. China’s critics have accused the country of painting its political system as superior in containing the virus and highlighting its role as a world leader, while ignoring early missteps including covering up the initial stages of the outbreak in December. Ch
The post-coronavirus world doesn’t look good for China
The new coronavirus has killed over 200,000 people and nearly ground the global economy to a halt. The next ripple effect could be a new Cold War, this time between China and the United States. Although it remains unclear when and how the pandemic will end, Beijing is preparing for an international backlash of blame over the disease outbreak and appears ready to push back, according to analysts. Chinese authorities have kick-started an internal process to solicit advice from think tanks, academics and others on how to deal with an increasingly adversarial global environment, said a government adviser who declined to give his name. At the same time, the devastating human toll and suffering c
Restaurant cluster shows how air conditioning helps coronavirus spread, study says
A study of 10 coronavirus patients from three families who dined at the same restaurant in southern China has suggested that air conditioning aided the spread of the virus.  Health authorities believe that Covid-19 is mainly transmitted through respiratory droplets produced when a coronavirus carrier coughs or sneezes. But the study, conducted by scientists in the southern city of Guangzhou, said droplet transmission alone could not explain the cluster of infections. “Strong airflow from the air conditioner could have propagated droplets” between three tables, according to the research. Restaurants should increase the space between tables and improve ventilation to reduce the risk of infect
China, US may stop their war of words at coronavirus summit
China and the United States are expected to call a timeout on their coronavirus blame game and focus on the challenges of the pandemic, when leaders of the Group of 20 hold talks via video conference on Thursday. According to a draft statement to be discussed at the summit, the leaders are expected to agree that the coronavirus is a common threat to humanity and united efforts are required to fight it. All eyes will be on the US and China, which have been locked in a war of words over a pandemic that has already infected more than 470,000 people and killed 21,000. The US has criticized China, where the outbreak was first reported, for its slow initial response and attempts to silence people