Xinyan Yu

Xinyan Yu

Senior Multimedia Producer, Inkstone

Xinyan is a Senior Video Producer at the South China Morning Post based in New York. She was formerly senior multimedia producer at Inkstone based in Beijing. Previously, she was a producer at BBC New

s.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
China coverage, video production
As deaths mount, is the US ready for the coronavirus?
As coronavirus cases surge worldwide, US President Donald Trump said his administration has done an “incredible job” preventing the spread of Covid-19 in the country. A US health official from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has meanwhile warned it is not a question of “if” but rather “when” America will face a community spread of the virus. California has been monitoring 8,400 people for signs of infection after it reported a coronavirus case of unknown origin, potentially the first instance of community transmission in the US. Washington state has reported 2 deaths from the coronavirus, and New York has reported its first case. The US has 88 reported cases as of March 2.
Winning ‘the lottery’: American recounts airlift out of Wuhan
Ningxi Xu first heard about the outbreak of an unknown pneumonia-like disease in China from a fellow plane passenger, hours before she was set to land in Wuhan to spend the Lunar New Year with her family. Xu, 30, brushed it off. It couldn’t have been a big issue as she hadn’t yet seen anything in the news, she reasoned. But from the moment her father picked her up from the airport wearing a face mask, her perception of the situation began to shift. Wuhan’s streets grew empty. Reports of people contracting the disease flooded her phone daily. News of family friends falling ill reached their home. As of Monday, more than 910 people have been killed by the new coronavirus, and Xu now finds hers
Norah Yang: introducing stand-up comedy to China
As a female comedian who performs in both English and Chinese, Norah Yang is a rarity in the world of stand-up comedy. Hailing from China, she did her first show in New York in October 2019. Yang spoke to the South China Morning Post about the emerging stand-up comedy industry in China and the funny business of bringing humor with Chinese characteristics to an international audience. 
How mahjong shaped America
Linda Feinstein has been playing mahjong, a Chinese tile-based game, since she was nine years old. Now 71, Feinstein runs a popular American mahjong club in New York that attracts hundreds of players every Monday. Mahjong was invented in ancient China and spread to the US in the 1920s. Its popularity waned as more women went to work, but it’s made a comeback after 9/11, and in this video we look at how mahjong has made an impact on America.
Inside China’s wig capital
China is the world’s largest exporter of wigs. In Xuchang city, China’s central Henan province, people have been making wigs for decades. In Xiaogong village on the outskirts of the city, more than half of its 900 families depend on this rapidly growing trade. Henan Rebecca Hair, the biggest local wig manufacturer, is a big employer in the region. But as the cost of labor has increased, it has started moving production overseas, including to Ghana, Nigeria and Cambodia. Check out our video, above, for more.
A US college says no to Chinese cash
The University of Minnesota suspended ties with Chinese tech giant Huawei in February, shortly after ending a nearly 10-year relationship with the Confucius Institute, a Chinese government program promoting its language and culture overseas. The college’s move comes close on the heels of similar actions by Stanford and the University of California, Berkeley. Washington has accused Beijing of using organizations like Huawei and the Confucius Institute to undermine American interests. For the University of Minnesota, it’s a choice between rejecting these organizations – or losing federal government funding. The South China Morning Post visited Minnesota to find out how the decision impacts the
Accused of espionage, this Chinese man petitions for justice in the US
China has a significant history of petitioners – those who try to solve their longstanding grievances by directly contacting major authority figures, hoping to force change from the top. But in truth, they have little chance of success. Some, like 54-year-old Bai Jiemen of Shanghai, go to great lengths to catch the attention of Chinese officials visiting the US. He says he has been falsely accused of spying by the Chinese government, and he wants to see this injustice corrected.    But Bai’s attempt to reach the motorcade of Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He, who was in Washington for trade talks in January, led to a US Secret Service officer being injured. Bai may now face more than seven years o
The front lines of the opioid crisis
Overdoses linked to fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times stronger than heroin, killed nearly 30,000 people in the United States in 2017. One of the people on the front lines of the opioid crisis is 21-year-old Anja Lesniak, a recovering opioid addict. Anja lives in what some call ground zero of America's opioid crisis, the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Officials say that most of the fentanyl sold in the state of Pennsylvania can be traced back to China. As part of a ceasefire agreement in the US-China trade war, China has agreed to crack down on restrictions on fentanyl and related drugs. We spoke to Anja about what opioids are doing to the community in Philadelphia and why this