Xinyan Yu

Xinyan Yu

Senior Multimedia Producer, Inkstone

Xinyan is a Senior Video Producer at the South China Morning Post based in New York. She was formerly senior multimedia producer at Inkstone based in Beijing. Previously, she was a producer at BBC New

s.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
China coverage, video production
Norah Yang: introducing stand-up comedy to China
As a female comedian who performs in both English and Chinese, Norah Yang is a rarity in the world of stand-up comedy. Hailing from China, she did her first show in New York in October 2019. Yang spoke to the South China Morning Post about the emerging stand-up comedy industry in China and the funny business of bringing humor with Chinese characteristics to an international audience. 
Norah Yang: introducing stand-up comedy to China
How mahjong shaped America
Linda Feinstein has been playing mahjong, a Chinese tile-based game, since she was nine years old. Now 71, Feinstein runs a popular American mahjong club in New York that attracts hundreds of players every Monday. Mahjong was invented in ancient China and spread to the US in the 1920s. Its popularity waned as more women went to work, but it’s made a comeback after 9/11, and in this video we look at how mahjong has made an impact on America.
How mahjong shaped America
Inside China’s wig capital
China is the world’s largest exporter of wigs. In Xuchang city, China’s central Henan province, people have been making wigs for decades. In Xiaogong village on the outskirts of the city, more than half of its 900 families depend on this rapidly growing trade. Henan Rebecca Hair, the biggest local wig manufacturer, is a big employer in the region. But as the cost of labor has increased, it has started moving production overseas, including to Ghana, Nigeria and Cambodia. Check out our video, above, for more.
Inside China’s wig capital
A US college says no to Chinese cash
The University of Minnesota suspended ties with Chinese tech giant Huawei in February, shortly after ending a nearly 10-year relationship with the Confucius Institute, a Chinese government program promoting its language and culture overseas. The college’s move comes close on the heels of similar actions by Stanford and the University of California, Berkeley. Washington has accused Beijing of using organizations like Huawei and the Confucius Institute to undermine American interests. For the University of Minnesota, it’s a choice between rejecting these organizations – or losing federal government funding. The South China Morning Post visited Minnesota to find out how the decision impacts the
A US college says no to Chinese cash
Accused of espionage, this Chinese man petitions for justice in the US
China has a significant history of petitioners – those who try to solve their longstanding grievances by directly contacting major authority figures, hoping to force change from the top. But in truth, they have little chance of success. Some, like 54-year-old Bai Jiemen of Shanghai, go to great lengths to catch the attention of Chinese officials visiting the US. He says he has been falsely accused of spying by the Chinese government, and he wants to see this injustice corrected.    But Bai’s attempt to reach the motorcade of Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He, who was in Washington for trade talks in January, led to a US Secret Service officer being injured. Bai may now face more than seven years o
Accused of espionage, this Chinese man petitions for justice in the US
The front lines of the opioid crisis
Overdoses linked to fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times stronger than heroin, killed nearly 30,000 people in the United States in 2017. One of the people on the front lines of the opioid crisis is 21-year-old Anja Lesniak, a recovering opioid addict. Anja lives in what some call ground zero of America's opioid crisis, the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Officials say that most of the fentanyl sold in the state of Pennsylvania can be traced back to China. As part of a ceasefire agreement in the US-China trade war, China has agreed to crack down on restrictions on fentanyl and related drugs. We spoke to Anja about what opioids are doing to the community in Philadelphia and why this
The front lines of the opioid crisis
A celebrity that dazzles unlike any other duck
A mysterious bird has become one of New York’s most unlikely attractions. The beautiful male Mandarin duck caught the attention of bird watchers in Central Park in October. Soon after, one of the surprised visitors – David Barrett, who runs the Twitter account Manhattan Bird Alert – posted a video of the fowl online. It immediately went viral. Now the duck is drawing flocks of fans from all over the US, attracted by his feisty personality and the mystery of how a bird native to East Asia made it to middle of Manhattan. Watch the video, above, to witness the star power. (Warning: dad jokes inside.)
A celebrity that dazzles unlike any other duck
Baby panda takes her first steps
Two panda cubs were born in July 2018 at the Chimelong Safari Park in Guangzhou, southern China. One of them, Ting Zai, is now learning to take her first steps. They will gradually be weaned off their mother's care and start eating bamboo and fending for themselves.
Baby panda takes her first steps