Yingzhi Yang

Yingzhi Yang

Reporter, Technology

Yingzhi is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a China tech reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
China's tech industry
Inside China’s multibillion-dollar influencer market
For the Lunar New Year in February, China’s ubiquitous mobile payment service WeChat Pay hired Becky Li to be a “chief experience officer,” showing off how easy it was to pay for things with your phone, even when traveling overseas. “I thought WeChat would hire a celebrity,” said Li in her office in the heart of Guangzhou. Li is no pop star or TV personality. But in a way, she’s exactly the kind of celebrity that brands increasingly lust after. With more than 7.5 million combined followers on social media platforms WeChat and Weibo, Li is one of China’s top fashion bloggers. She’s one of China’s influencers, known locally as KOLs – key opinion leaders – who have been able to convert fans an
Gay app Grindr is going public
Grindr, one of the most popular gay dating apps in the world, is planning to go public. The IPO plan has been green-lit by the executive board of its parent company, Chinese gaming firm Kunlun Group. Grindr will be listed outside of China, and there’s no timetable yet. The timing of the debut depends on market conditions and approval from Chinese and overseas regulators, Kunlun said in a public filing on Wednesday. Founded in 2009, Grindr boasts over three million daily active users in about 200 countries. Two years ago, Kunlun bought a 61.5% stake in Grindr for $88 million. In January, the Chinese firm acquired the remaining shares for $152 million, buying full ownership of the app. There
A Chinese tech bigwig wants to make gadgets that are cheap AND good
Picture something made in China. If what you saw was cheap but poorly made  – then this Chinese techie would like to prove you wrong. Lei Jun, CEO and co-founder of Xiaomi, best known as a smartphone maker, is convinced that he can build a consumer products empire that creates everything from pens to neck pillows: and everything will be both affordable and well-made. Talk is cheap, but investors are unlikely to dismiss Lei's goals as lofty. In fact, bankers are set to value his company at a whopping $100 billion when it goes public later this year, a person familiar with Xiaomi’s IPO plan told the South China Morning Post. By way of comparison, Facebook had a valuation of $104.2 billion when
Xiaomi’s billionaire co-founder has a business mantra: don’t be greedy
Apple's iconic 1997 advertising campaign had the slogan, “think different.” Alphabet, Google's parent, exhorts its employees to “do the right thing.” In its early years, Facebook wanted its developers to “move fast and break things.” Xiaomi, often known as China's answer to Apple, is doing a bit of all of the above, guided by one philosophy: don't be greedy. “We must curb the tendency for greed and win absolute trust from consumers,” Lei Jun, 48, the Chinese smartphone and gadget maker’s billionaire co-founder and chief executive, said in an interview with the South China Morning Post at Xiaomi’s Beijing headquarters. What I want to achieve is that when consumers buy the product, they can cl