Yujie Xue

Yujie Xue

Reporter, Technology 

Yujie Xue covers China technology for the Post in Shenzhen. Before joining the SCMP in 2020, she was a technology features reporter at Shanghai-based news outlet Sixth Tone. She studied Mass Communica

tion at Boston University.

Location
Shenzhen
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
China technology
Clubhouse in China is a party that knows the cops are coming
UPDATE: Multiple media outlets are reporting that Clubhouse went offline in China on the evening of February 8.  Clubhouse, the hottest new social media app from Silicon Valley, is the talk of the town in mainland China because it has emerged as a rare space to discuss sensitive topics freely.  On China’s largest e-commerce platform, Taobao, a search using the keywords “clubhouse invitation” in Chinese generated more than two dozen results. An online shop in Shanghai, boldly calling itself “clubhouse invitation code,” has sold more than 200 invitations in the last month, with codes priced up to US$50. For users in mainland China, the app, which doesn’t support text or video, has offered a fr
Chinese city lockdown exposed reliance on food delivery apps
In January, a northern Chinese city lockdown created a temporary humanitarian crisis when 300,000 residents suddenly could not access food and medical supplies.  The outpouring of criticism also had a complaint unique to modern times: the suspension of delivery and e-commerce services like Meituan and Ele.me caused major problems in Tonghua, a rust-belt town near North Korea.  While Tonghua is not well-known for being a tech-driven metropolis, the adverse reaction to the sudden withdrawal of convenient internet services shows just how essential they have become to everyday life in China. “Where are those food delivery and online grocery apps when you need them most?” said Kevin Li, a 32-yea
Deaths at e-commerce giant cause ‘996’ controversy
China is a global leader in the technology industry, and tech companies have grown to become dominant forces in Chinese society. But it also has a dark side.  The death of two employees at the social commerce giant Pinduoduo has placed the spotlight on a culture of high-stress jobs and overwork. Called “996” (meaning working from 9am to 9pm for 6 days per week), many fear the infamous culture has become worse and not better due to pressure from the pandemic. On December 29, 2020, a 22-year-old woman surnamed Zhang, who was working at a new business unit in Urumqi, died. On January 4, another young worker, surnamed Tan, jumped to his death in his hometown of Changsha. Public anger at Pinduod
Fears for fate of China's elderly after pandemic digital boom
Since the coronavirus outbreak, 72-year-old Wang Yingru feels like a stranger in an unfamiliar world. Simple everyday pleasures she used to enjoy, such as visits to the supermarket or using public transport to see friends, are now as impossible as making her own medical appointments. She feels lost and left behind, unable to do anything or go anywhere without the help of her children. To better contain the outbreak and prevent further spread, China quickly digitized its private services this year and placed more emphasis on information collecting.  The public needs to show a digital QR code to enter shopping centers, banks and use public transportation. Hospitals have also rapidly moved res