Zheping Huang

Zheping Huang

Zheping is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a technology reporter covering cryptocurrency, blockchain and gaming for the South China Morning Post. Previously he wrote about China for Quartz.

How 5G will fast track the internet of things
In Hangzhou, police officers are notified of major car accidents soon after they happen, traffic lights automatically adjust to changes in the volume of vehicles on the road and, in emergencies, fire trucks and ambulances are not stopped by a single red light until they arrive at the scene. The city in eastern China’s Zhejiang province is one of the country’s major tech hubs. Its smart infrastructure powers the City Brain project, a cloud computing and AI-driven urban traffic-management system. It covers a total area of 162 square miles – that’s seven times the size of Manhattan. When 5G mobile services start to roll out worldwide next year, smart cities such as Hangzhou will get even smarte
China’s new rules on video games: no blood, dead bodies, or mahjong
After a nearly nine-month freeze on new video games, Chinese authorities on Monday began accepting new applications for publishing games in the country again – with strings attached. China has stepped up its regulation of an industry that it considers harmful to the country’s young people, a move that has hurt companies like Tencent, China’s biggest gaming company. The rules will be closely studied (and followed) by any developer who wants a piece of the world’s biggest gaming market. They also offer insight into what is cool and what is not in the eyes of China’s content regulators. Here are some of the new rules confirmed by the South China Morning Post: No dead bodies, no blood pools Chi
8 ways China controls the internet
Governments around the world are scrambling to figure out how to deal with harmful content online, whatever they think it is. The United Kingdom seeks to enforce a mandatory age check for online pornography. Singapore has proposed laws targeting the spread of “fake news.” New Australian legislation punishes social media companies if they fail to take down violent content quickly. While different countries have different things in mind when it comes to what is bad, China’s sophisticated censorship machine could provide a playbook for how to control information. Here’s a look at some of the tools China has used to police the internet. 1) Content bans The Chinese government has a slew of laws
In China’s Silicon Valley, work beats sleep — or a sex life
He is so focused on keeping his start-up alive that he can't sleep at night. She was asked in an interview if she would be willing to break up with her boyfriend for the job. A young couple wants their own family but has no energy for sex after work. These are some of the struggles faced by the hundreds of thousands of young workers in China’s tech industry. They are people like Yu Haoran, a 26-year-old computer science major, who in 2014 founded Jisuanke, a start-up in Beijing’s hi-tech Zhongguancun district to teach kids coding. I haven’t really thought of living a life. I’m building something, and before I finish it, there won’t be anything else on my mind Yu Haoran, founder, Jisuanke Yu
This horror game was taking off. Then gamers saw hidden Xi insults
In the horror game Devotion, a Taiwanese cult follower kills his daughter with venomous snakes. In real life, the game’s developers seem to have killed their instant hit in China with Winnie the Pooh. Released February 19 on PC games distribution platform Steam, Devotion received a positive rating from 95% of the more than 4,000 gamers who posted reviews in the first four days. At one point the indie title, from Taiwan-based studio Red Candle, was the most popular game on Chinese streaming network Bilibili, generating millions of views from live-streaming hosts walking through the game for audiences. Tick tock. #Devotion還願 will be released on February 19, at 5:00 Pacific time for US$16.99. O
Chinese high schoolers make a game about sex education
A group of Chinese teenagers has created a video game about sex education, earning positive reviews for its exploration of topics still wildly considered taboo in mainland China. In Self-Reliance, players make decisions for the protagonists in a variety of adult content-free scenarios, leading the story in different directions. The game was developed by Eroducate: seven high school students in Shanghai who not only made the game, but also acted on camera to simulate various sex education issues facing Chinese teens. One chapter of the game features an underaged couple debating whether they should have unprotected sex. Another explores a potential rape scenario. The personal computer title w
China’s top app teaches Xi Jinping propaganda
What’s the most popular app in China? No, it’s not WeChat, despite its one billion users. Nor video sharing app Douyin, known in the west as TikTok. Instead it’s an app designed to teach Chinese people the tenets of their leader President Xi Jinping. With the country’s ruling Communist Party launching a new campaign that calls on its cadres to immerse themselves in political doctrine every day, a slick tool for teaching “Xi Jinping Thought” has become the most popular smartphone app in the nation. Xuexi Qiangguo, which translates to “Study powerful country,” is now the most downloaded item on Apple’s domestic App Store. Released by the party’s publicity department in January, Xuexi Qiangguo
China bans political satire and sexy moaning from video apps
Making memes of Communist Party leaders, political satire and overly sexual moaning have all been banned on China’s thriving short video app industry. Chinese authorities have introduced detailed regulations covering the industry, singling out 100 categories of banned content in its ongoing effort to clean up China’s cyberspace. Short video apps – such as Douyin, known internationally as TikTok – are wildly popular in China, boasting an estimated 594 million users in the country. The China Netcasting Services Association, one of the largest internet associations in the country, released two sets of management rules on Wednesday to give clearer guidance on what content needs to be censored by
Christmas comes early for China’s gamers
It could be a very merry Christmas for China’s gamers and game developers alike. After a nine-month freeze, the Chinese government is once again starting to approve video games for release in the country. Publishers in China are required to submit games for review to authorities before they can be sold in the domestic market, but the process had been suspended since April as Beijing tightened its control over gaming in China. Feng Shixin, an official with the Chinese Communist Party’s propaganda department, said on Friday that the country’s new gaming regulator has completed reviewing an initial batch of video games, which will soon receive licenses for domestic publication. “The first batc
An Iron Man rip-off gets pulled from the Chinese internet
What’s the name of that superhero? You know, the one who cracks wise as he fights baddies with an armored iron suit? Ah, yes – Armored War God Monkey King. The latest film adaptation of a classic Chinese novel has been pulled from a streaming video platform in China after being criticized for copying Marvel Studios’ Iron Man. The film Armored War God Monkey King, based on the novel Journey to the West and starring an armored version of its mischevious protagonist the Monkey King, was set to stream exclusively on streaming platform Tencent Video from Tuesday. But it never made it online. After watching the trailer, Marvel fans in the world’s largest internet market slammed producers Daishu M