Zhou Xin

Zhou Xin

Political Economy Editor

Xin is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a deputy China editor for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
China's economy
China’s leader seeks to rally private business to the Communist Party’s cause
President Xi Jinping has told China’s private entrepreneurs they are a key part of the nation’s “socialist market economy” as the Communist Party seeks to rally the private sector amid the ongoing tensions with the United States.  Xi’s message was delivered on Wednesday, a day after the party released a policy that ordered the private sector to help meet the nation’s strategic goals as it faces an increasingly hostile external environment. “It is critically important to promote the healthy development of the non-public economy and the healthy growth of people in the non-public sector,” Xi said, according to the official news agency Xinhua. The president urged the United Front Work Departmen
500 rich Chinese gained EU citizenship via Cyprus, leaked documents show
More than 500 Chinese people, including Asia’s richest woman, obtained European Union citizenship in the island nation of Cyprus between 2017 and 2019, according to leaked documents obtained by Al Jazeera’s Investigative Unit. The documents, which are said to contain information on 2,500 immigrants to Cyprus under the so-called golden passport program, appear to shed light on the secretive migration plans of China’s elite, adding to the perception that many are gripped by insecurity about retaining their wealth. Chinese citizens form the second-largest group of people taking part in the golden passport program, which requires applicants to invest at least €2.15 million ($2.54 million) in Cyp
TikTok’s challenge to Trump will not be easy
Many analysts think TikTok is unlikely to win its challenge to Donald Trump’s order banning the popular video-sharing app if it does not sell to a US company. The US president signed an executive order on August 6 banning TikTok within 45 days unless it is sold to US owners, citing national security concerns. Trump made the order under a 1977 law that lets the president block transactions and seize assets in response to an “unusual and extraordinary threat.” Trump issued another order a week later giving ByteDance, its Chinese owner, 90 days to divest its US operations, including all data gathered in the United States. The lawsuit, to be filed by TikTok on Monday, challenges the August 6 ex
China’s leader assures business chiefs he’s still committed to reform
China’s President Xi Jinping has promised leading international business executives that China will stick to its “peaceful development” path and continue to reform and open up its domestic market. In a bid to win the hearts and minds of the global business community amid rising tensions with the United States, Xi’s letter to the Global CEO Council stated that the long-term economic fundamentals of the Chinese economy remain sound and “will not change” despite the impact of the coronavirus. A summary of the letter was published by the official Xinhua News Agency on Thursday, shortly after China announced its economy grew by 3.2% in the second quarter of 2020. This followed the historic 6.8% d
Will Trump cut China from the dollar payment system?
Will the Trump administration weaponize the US dollar to hurt China following Beijing’s plan to impose a new national security law in Hong Kong? This new and troubling question is suddenly looming for Chinese officials.  While the probability remains very low, the risk of a financial war – including being cut off from the US dollar system – is no longer unthinkable for China. President Donald Trump has not mentioned sanctions against Hong Kong or Chinese financial institutions amid worsening US-China relations. But if Washington were to sever China’s corporate and financial system from the US dollar payments system, it could start a financial tsunami that would lead global finance into unch
With a poor social safety net, is China prepared to handle a job crisis?
The coronavirus pandemic has thrown tens of millions out of work in China, piling pressure on the country’s patchy social welfare network and creating a major policy challenge for Beijing. While the Chinese government has vowed to handle the sharp rise in unemployment, some economists have warned that the structural changes in the economy that helped absorb waves of unemployed in the past are no longer present to help in the current situation. A failure to revive the services sector and private businesses, which account for the vast majority of jobs, could darken China’s economic future and undermine the Communist Party’s narrative that its model of governance will lead China to a great reju
Will coronavirus pandemic change China’s role in the global economy?
A consensus is growing in Beijing that the coronavirus pandemic is set to make the world more hostile toward China.  The growing hostility could undermine the accommodating international environment that underpinned the country’s spectacular rise from a closed communist backwater to a global economic powerhouse. The global health crisis, which has killed more than 210,000 people and infected more than 3 million worldwide, has many in China wondering how the nation can continue to thrive amid an international backlash over its handling of the virus, which first appeared in the central city of Wuhan. One of the most pressing challenges facing the central government will be the acceleration of
China, US may stop their war of words at coronavirus summit
China and the United States are expected to call a timeout on their coronavirus blame game and focus on the challenges of the pandemic, when leaders of the Group of 20 hold talks via video conference on Thursday. According to a draft statement to be discussed at the summit, the leaders are expected to agree that the coronavirus is a common threat to humanity and united efforts are required to fight it. All eyes will be on the US and China, which have been locked in a war of words over a pandemic that has already infected more than 470,000 people and killed 21,000. The US has criticized China, where the outbreak was first reported, for its slow initial response and attempts to silence people
China’s economy could shrink for the first time since Mao died
The odds are rising that China will report a sharp deceleration in growth – or even a contraction in the first quarter as a result of the coronavirus epidemic. The outbreak has paralyzed the country’s manufacturing and service sectors, putting Beijing in the difficult position of either forgoing its economic growth goal for 2020 or returning to its old playbook of massive debt-fuelled economic stimulus to support growth. The first available economic indicators showing the extent of the economic damage done by the epidemic have prompted economists to slash their Chinese growth forecasts. Several are even expecting the once-unthinkable scenario in which China’s economy posts a zero growth rate
Economic shock of coronavirus may ‘hit harder than Sars’
Cities across China have become virtual ghost towns as public fear grows over the spread of the deadly coronavirus. Early signs indicate the outbreak could deal a heavy blow to the country’s already fragile economic recovery. As the virus has fanned out from the central Chinese city of Wuhan, in Hubei province, authorities have taken increasingly aggressive measures to contain the Sars-like virus: curbing public transport, shuttering entertainment venues and shortening business hours. The rapid transmission of the coronavirus, partly due to initial mishandling by officials in Wuhan and Hubei, comes as China is trying to stabilize economic growth in 2020 following the signing of a phase one t