Zhuang Pinghui

Zhuang Pinghui

Beijing Correspondent, China

Pinghui is a contributor to Inkstone. She reports on China news for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Healthcare, social trends, politics
China reports second death from coronavirus infection
A second person has died after contracting the coronavirus found in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, while Thailand has confirmed a second case of the virus.   A 69-year-old man died on Wednesday, Wuhan Health Commission said late on Thursday. He had shown symptoms on December 21 before being admitted to Wuhan Medical Treatment Center – where all suspected cases of the viral pneumonia have been treated – on January 4 after his condition worsened, the commission’s statement said. The man had a heart muscle infection and tuberculosis when he was admitted to hospital, it said. It follows the death last week of a 61-year-old man, who had tested positive for the coronavirus and also had abdomin
China reports second death from coronavirus infection
China says it’s found what’s causing mystery pneumonia outbreak
China says it has identified a new strain of coronavirus from the same family that caused the 2002-03 Sars epidemic as the cause of a mystery pneumonia outbreak in the central city of Wuhan. At least 59 people have been infected since the outbreak was first reported last month, prompting worries about an epidemic like Sars, which killed hundreds of people in China. Laboratory tests have identified the new virus and the whole genome sequence has been obtained, state broadcaster CCTV reported on Thursday, citing a task force of medical experts. Fifteen patients in Wuhan had tested positive for the virus, which showed “typical coronavirus morphology,” the television report said. “The pathogen o
China says it’s found what’s causing mystery pneumonia outbreak
Man must pay $17,200 for throwing ‘lucky coins’ at an airplane
A 28-year-old man in China was ordered to pay $17,200 in damages to budget carrier Lucky Air for throwing coins at one of its planes in the hope of a safe journey last year. A court in Anhui province, in southeastern China, handed down the order in July, but it was only made public recently when the court posted the ruling online. Lu Chao, who was a first-time flier, admitted to throwing the coins at the plane for good luck as he boarded on February 17, 2019. The flight was canceled after airline staff found two 1 yuan coins on the ground near one of the plane’s engines. All passengers had to leave the plane and it was grounded while it underwent safety checks. Lucky Air had to arrange acco
Man must pay $17,200 for throwing ‘lucky coins’ at an airplane
Is this winning logo for a Chinese city a Disney rip-off?
The winner of a logo competition aimed at promoting tourism in a Chinese city has been accused of ripping off Disney’s distinctive font. The government of Dalian in northeastern China published the winning design of its “Dalian has quality gifts” competition on December 11. But internet users soon identified that the lettering looked a lot like that of Walt Disney’s signature company logo. The city’s Bureau of Culture and Tourism, which is in charge of the competition, said on Tuesday it was aware of the plagiarism accusations and was conducting an investigation. “The investigation is currently under way and the results will be announced as soon as possible,” the statement said, adding that
Is this winning logo for a Chinese city a Disney rip-off?
Apology for Godfrey Gao death met with criticism
A Chinese television network has pulled a reality show and apologized after the sudden death on-set of Taiwanese-Canadian actor and model Godfrey Gao. Zhejiang Television offered an apology in an interview with the show’s director, Lin Yong. It was posted online on Thursday, about a week after the performer, known as Gao Yixiang in Chinese, collapsed while shooting an episode of Chase Me. In the post titled “Sorry, we didn’t protect Yixiang in his prime,” Lin said the network had been “immersed in grief and remorse since the accident happened.” “We feel we owe an apology to Godfrey Gao, to his parents and to all who loved him,” he said. Gao, 35, was a contestant on the show and collapsed aft
Apology for Godfrey Gao death met with criticism
Woman who killed seven caught after 20 years on the run
A Chinese woman accused of murdering seven people, including a three-year-old girl, has been captured after 20 years on the run. Lao Rongzhi, 45, allegedly killed seven people together with her boyfriend Fa Ziying over a three-year period. While Fa was caught by police in the eastern city of Hefei in July 1999, Lao managed to escape and had been living under a false identity since then. Fa initially refused to tell police anything about his girlfriend and later provided false information that helped her cover her tracks. He eventually confessed to kidnapping and killing seven people and was executed in December 1999 at the age of 35.  Police said last Friday that Lao had been arrested at a
Woman who killed seven caught after 20 years on the run
Will an online ban stub out China’s vaping industry?
The vaping industry has suffered a series of setbacks around the world following a spate of deaths in the United States. A number of governments are now considering or implementing bans even as Donald Trump has wavered over whether to introduce similar measures in the US. Now China, where a lack of regulation and the ease of buying online helped create millions of e-cigarette users, has dealt what may be the most substantial blow yet to the global industry. The world’s largest country banned all sales of e-cigarettes online starting November 1. Tobacco has long been identified as a major public health challenge in China. The country is the world’s largest tobacco producer and has more than 3
Will an online ban stub out China’s vaping industry?
Chinese man held after attacking toddlers, teachers with chemicals
Authorities in China’s southwestern province of Yunnan said dozens of kindergarteners and staff in the city of Kaiyuan were victims of a caustic soda attack. More than 50 of the children were burned on Monday afternoon, two of them seriously, when a man scaled the wall of the kindergarten and sprayed the chemical, also known as lye or sodium hydroxide, on them. Police detained a 23-year-old man about 40 minutes after the attack, adding that they believed he was acting alone. In a statement, the Kaiyuan municipal government said that at about 3:35pm, a man surnamed Kong cut barbed wire and climbed over a wall into Dongcheng Kindergarten and sprayed sodium hydroxide on children and staff. It
Chinese man held after attacking toddlers, teachers with chemicals
Pilot grounded for life for inviting a woman to the cockpit
A Chinese pilot has been banned from flying for life for allowing a young woman to visit the cockpit. The incident happened on an Air Guilin flight 10 months ago, but the photos taken by the woman – later identified as Chen Yuying, a student who planned to become a flight attendant after graduation – only went viral on Sunday. Chen, a third-year student at Guilin Tourism University, was seen posing in front of a tea set sitting in a pilot’s seat. A caption of the photo reads: “I am super thankful to the pilot! I am so thrilled!” The picture, which was spotted this week on the Weibo social media site by someone working in the airline industry, caused an uproar among aviation specialists. They
Pilot grounded for life for inviting a woman to the cockpit
Chinese vapers upset by online sales ban of e-cigarettes
Chinese vapers are defending the health value of e-cigarettes, after the government further tightened sales of vaping devices in the country.  On Friday, the country’s tobacco regulator announced a ban on online sales and advertising of e-cigarettes as part of a campaign to prevent minors from accessing vaping products.  The new rule brings e-cigarettes under a sales and advertising ban similar to tobacco. With more than 300 million smokers, China is seen as a potential growth driver for the e-cigarette industry. But the online sales ban could deal a blow to vaping start-ups that have flourished over the past few years.  Similar to other parts of the world, e-cigarettes in China have gained
Chinese vapers upset by online sales ban of e-cigarettes