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    archiveJun 07
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    EDUCATION

    Cramming for the future

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    02
    EDUCATION

    How China is trying to bust high-tech exam cheats

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    03
    POLITICS

    Sonic attack? More Americans evacuated from China

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    04
    TECH

    Move over, ‘disruption.’ The most important buzzword in China tech is ‘sorry’

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    05
    POLITICS

    This is the island that will host Trump and Kim’s historic meeting

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    06
    BUSINESS

    Why China will hold on to its trillion-plus dollars of US debt

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    Cramming for the future
    Cramming for the future
    EDUCATION

    Cramming for the future

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    In the fourth story of our week-long series on China’s gruelling national college entrance exam, we meet two families moving mountains to support their teenagers at “Asia’s largest cram school.”

    Today is the first day of gaokao, China’s national college entrance exam.

    It will be two palm-sweating, hair-raising days for nearly 10 million high school students, who will be tested on nearly 12 years of studies.

    Only 40% will score highly enough to enroll in China’s universities. 

    Every June, a massive ceremony in the rural town of Maotanchang, in the eastern province of Anhui, sends off busloads of students through cheering crowds, as they head to test centers. 

    The town is home to Asia’s largest cram school.

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    Here, teenagers have been studying 16 hours a day, seven days a week – and their families have been with them every step of the way.

    We take you behind the scenes in this small rural town turned test-prep hub.

    Zoe Chen
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    Zoe is a video journalist at Inkstone. Previously, she was a video journalist and producer for BBC Chinese and BBC News in Beijing.
    How China is trying to bust high-tech exam cheats
    How China is trying to bust high-tech exam cheats
    EDUCATION

    How China is trying to bust high-tech exam cheats

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    Photo: Reuters/Stringer
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