Inkstone

Inkstone

Attacked by a white man, Chinese granny gives nearly US$1 million to fight racism
An elderly Asian woman who beat off a violent attacker on a San Fransisco street has vowed to donate almost US$1 million to end racism in Asian-American communities. Xie Xiaozhen, 76, has pledged the money that was raised on a GoFundMe page set up by her family after the vicious attack that left her badly bruised and bleeding heavily.  Her family said she was donating the money because fighting the problem of racism was “bigger than her.” The March 17 assault on the elderly grandmother made headlines globally when a video of her crying and trying to defend herself against a white male attacker. As of Thursday, the family’s charity page had raised US$962,275 – almost 20 times more than their
Coronavirus no longer deterring Chinese students looking abroad
Chinese students are starting to make plans for a post-coronavirus world and remain optimistic about studying abroad, but do have concerns about Beijing’s strained relationships with some foreign countries.  About half of the Chinese students surveyed by EIC Education, an education consultancy based in China, said they would like to go overseas this year or next.  60% of them said they would feel safe leaving home after getting a Covid-19 vaccination.  About 60% of students will feel confident about leaving if travel restrictions are eased for foreign students, infections at the destination stay low and on-campus teaching resumes. 30% of students preferred Britain to study, followed by 24.5
‘Stop interfering in China’s internal affairs’ merch is hot sale on Chinese internet
Sales of “patriotic” products that tell the United States to butt out of their internal affairs are booming in China after last week’s fiery Alaskan summit. Just days after the summit ended, mobile phone cases, cigarette lighters, T-shirts, vacuum mugs, hoodies, umbrellas, canvas bags, pants and even beers carrying pro-Chinese sentiments have been selling fast on mainland China’s shopping website Taobao. Ads for the “patriotic” products promise immediate shipping while some online shops sell merchandise carrying slogans translated into English, such as, “stop interfering in China’s internal affairs.” The products were inspired by quotes from China’s foreign policy chief Yang Jiechi, in the
Major archeology site discoveries rekindle theories that alien civilization once roamed Earth
A recent discovery at a famous archeology site in China has rekindled fantastical theories that it was once home to a civilization not from earth.  A recent finding of more than 500 artifacts in Sanxingdui, a Bronze Age archeology site in central Sichuan province, included the notable discovery of a gold mask that a priest may have worn.  The mask carries wide-eyes and a deep nose, similar to earlier discoveries of bronze human statues, fueling speculation of alien inhabitants because the features look “foreign.”  In a question list compiled by the state broadcaster CCTV, some people said those bronze face masks looked more like movie characters in Avatar than Han Chinese people.  “Does tha
Chinese comedy show pulls episode after it dunks too hard on basketball players
A popular Chinese comedy show said on Sunday that it would suspend a highly anticipated episode roasting two famous Chinese basketball players after viewers criticized it for being uncomfortably harsh.  The decision from Tencent’s Roast! also highlights the push and pull between China’s state-led sports system and private industry.   On March 14, the show aired the first half of a series roasting Chinese National Team basketball players Guo Ailun and Zhou Qi. The two players were part of a team that faced intense domestic criticism after their lackluster performance at the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup, one of the most important international tournaments in the sport. China flamed out in th
The daunting task of repairing antique Chinese texts
Over the past decade, a millennial fascinated with rare books has painstakingly restored dozens of frayed, rotten and torn manuscripts – all by hand. Lian Chengchun, 32, is one of a dwindling number of people who make a living by fixing ancient Chinese books. China classifies antique books as those printed before 1912. According to one report, there are an estimated 50 million in China, and only about 20 million have been preserved, creating a daunting task for antique book fixers like Lian. “Some books have rotted, some are aged, some have water damage, and some cannot even be opened properly,” Lian says. “Some books are especially hard to fix, such as ones that are infested with bugs or h
Chinese girl becomes internet star for her martial arts skills
A seven-year-old girl in southern China’s Guizhou province has become an internet star for her slick martial arts skills. Yang Zixuan started practising cartwheels and flips when she was just three years old. She now has more than 600,000 followers on the country’s social media platforms. 
The world’s second largest dam was built insanely fast thanks to AI
China’s newest hydropower will produce so much energy when completed in July that it will dwarf the production of America’s Hoover Dam.  Standing nearly 985 feet tall, and made with more than 8 million cubic metres of concrete, the Baihetan dam towers over the upper section of the Yangtze River.  It will power homes, office buildings and factories as far away as Jiangsu, a coastal province more than 1,240 miles to the east. But it is the speed of the project, in the southwestern province of Sichuan, that has raised the eyebrows of experts, even in China.  Despite many civil engineering difficulties, including treacherous terrain and a remote location, Baihetan has taken just four years to b