Science

Science

Where is the rogue Chinese scientist who gene-edited babies?
The whereabouts of a rogue Chinese scientist and his “gene-edited babies” remain a mystery, as the release of more of his research data triggers renewed discussions of his attempt to create the first gene-edited babies.  He Jiankui, former associate professor of life science at Southern University of Science and Technology of China in Shenzhen, shocked the world last year when he announced that he had edited the genes of the twin girls to prevent them from inheriting HIV from their father. The claim unleashed a storm of criticism from the international scientific community for the unsafe and unethical use of the technology. Soon after He announced his “success” in creating the world’s first
Where is the rogue Chinese scientist who gene-edited babies?
Chinese astronomers discover black hole so big that it shouldn’t exist
Chinese astronomers have discovered a black hole in the Milky Way that current scientific theory says is too big to exist. Scientists from the National Astronomical Observatory of China say the find, dubbed LB-1, has 70 times the mass of the sun, even though physics says that is impossible. “We were so shocked we could not believe what we saw,” researcher Liu Jifeng said in Beijing on Thursday. He said he and his colleagues consulted astronomers from around the world and after three years of fact-checking announced their find in an article published by the scientific journal Nature. Present theory says that stars are made up of various elements, ranging from light gas to heavy metals. Lighte
Chinese astronomers discover black hole so big that it shouldn’t exist
Chinese pet detective reunites lost furry friends with owners
If your beloved furry friend goes missing in China, hiring a pet detective is now a way to increase your chances of a happy reunion. Equipped with hi-tech investigative tools, Shanghai-based private sleuth Sun Jinrong is handling cases across the country.  In about seven years of pet detecting, he has found about 1,000 wayward animals and claims a success rate of 60-70%.
Chinese pet detective reunites lost furry friends with owners
Meet the man who put feathers on dinosaurs
One of the most delightful modern discoveries is the realization that dinosaurs still roam our planet. We just call them birds.  For every adult who was once a dinosaur-obsessed 8-year-old kid, we can thank Professor Xu Xing, a Chinese paleontologist and one of the world’s most prolific dinosaur hunters.  He is on a mission to broaden our mental images of dinosaurs and improve the popularity of all dinosaurs -- not just the famous species.  “If you ask kids about their favorite dinosaurs, they usually say Stegosaurus or Tyrannosaurus Rex, right? Because it’s all deeply embedded in textbooks and popular science. Even now there’s a lot of new fossils being discovered in China and not many peop
Meet the man who put feathers on dinosaurs
China’s Mars mission passes landing test for 2020 launch
China has completed a test of its Mars lander, placing the country on track for its first mission to the red planet next year. In the span of several decades, China has emerged from an economic backwater to a rising space power, with recent breakthroughs including the landing of a rover on the far side of the moon. In developing its Mars mission, China is following in the footsteps of the US, which in the 1970s successfully put the Viking landers on Mars and last landed a rover there in November 2018 in its InSight mission.  China’s space program could contribute to international efforts to understand the climate and natural resources on Mars. While it is cold (the average temperature is ab
China’s Mars mission passes landing test for 2020 launch
China wants its own Yellowstone National Park
China plans to develop a unified national park system by 2020, after gathering inspiration from wilderness recreation areas in the United States.  Chinese officials in charge of the project have visited Yellowstone National Park and other protected areas and met with conservation experts to prepare for the task.  Chinese state media reports said 10 national parks have started operating on a trial basis to protect ecological systems. The conservation efforts are said to protect threatened plant species and animals such as the giant panda, Siberian tiger and Amur leopard.
China wants its own Yellowstone National Park
Chinese scientists use AI to diagnose genetic disorders in babies
Chinese scientists say they've developed an AI-powered software to help screen newborns for genetic disorders through facial scans. Researchers from the Shanghai Children’s Medical Center and the Shanghai Pediatric Center said their new assistive diagnosis tool, which they described as the first of its kind, was designed to detect more than 100 disorders with distinctive facial features, according to a report by state-owned China News Service. They said their AI-enabled tool would be used for initial screening, helping to avoid missed or wrong diagnosis of newborns. Prominent facial features of children with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), for example, include thin eyebrows that often me
Chinese scientists use AI to diagnose genetic disorders in babies
Seaweed is the star ingredient in new Alzheimer’s drug approved by China
The world’s first new drug for treating Alzheimer’s disease in nearly two decades, based on seaweed, was approved by the Chinese government this weekend. The drug, Oligomannate, could represent a breakthrough in the global effort to develop treatments for the neurodegenerative disorder, which has no cure and is predicted to affect 150 million people worldwide by 2050. The National Medical Products Administration, China’s drug regulator, said Oligomannate had been approved for the treatment of “mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease and improving cognitive function.” As brain cells degenerate, symptoms progress from repeating words to forgetting the faces of family members. The decline in brain
Seaweed is the star ingredient in new Alzheimer’s drug approved by China
China is breeding an army of beetles to fight a ‘terrifying’ pest
Scientists are breeding millions of beetles for a battle against a weed that threatens to choke rivers across China and clog the country’s famed Three Gorges Dam. Alligator weed is native to South America but was introduced to the Yangtze River in 1937 by the occupying Japanese as a feed crop for their horses. After the second world war, it was grown across southern China for animal feed, garden greening and herbal medicine. It was not until the 1980s that researchers realized what people living along the river knew – the prolific alligator weed was a menace. Other crops such as rice could not compete with the weed for nutrients, sunlight and space, and it began to choke the life out of fis
China is breeding an army of beetles to fight a ‘terrifying’ pest
A novel way from Chinese scientists to measure how well you sleep
Insomnia is a common issue around the world. Anywhere from 25% to 40% of people in a given population deal with difficulty falling or staying asleep. But Chinese scientists say they’ve found a way to use artificial intelligence (AI) to tell how well people have been sleeping from the way they walk. Professor Zhu Tingshao and colleagues at the Institute of Psychology in Beijing have developed an accurate method of determining sleep quality through its impact on gait, with the help of a machine learning algorithm and a video game component, according to a paper published by online scientific journal PLOS One. Zhu and his team found upper body parts – such as head and shoulders – betrayed more
A novel way from Chinese scientists to measure how well you sleep