The latest collections from luxury brands and high fashion designers on the catwalks and beyond

Collateral damage: fashion brand hit by China’s ban on black T-shirts
China’s ban on sales of black clothing to Hong Kong has unexpectedly hit a fashion company specializing in casual wear in black. “Right now all my items for the September drop are being held at customs. Couriers won’t even pick them up,” said Brian Au, whose fashion brand CHSN1 sells hoodies, sweatshirts and casual sportswear that come mainly in black. Chinese authorities have banned sales to Hong Kong of black garments such as T-shirts and jeans, which anti-government protesters have adopted as part of their signature look in their months-long campaign for greater accountability and democracy. The snag highlights the surprising and far-reaching consequences of the Hong Kong government’s pus
Collateral damage: fashion brand hit by China’s ban on black T-shirts
Dior apologizes for omitting Taiwan in China map
Luxury brand Christian Dior has apologized after it used a map of China that did not include Taiwan in a campus presentation, joining a growing list of foreign companies running afoul of Beijing’s political correctness. In a statement issued early Thursday, the fashion powerhouse says it “strictly upholds China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity” and “cherishes the Chinese people’s feelings.” Chinese authorities have forced international companies, such as airlines, to follow its protocol in referring to Taiwan, which Beijing does not control but claims as its own territory. Beijing’s increasing assertiveness has caught foreign organizations from Apple to the NBA in dilemmas between ple
Dior apologizes for omitting Taiwan in China map
Taiwan’s Wednesday Addams
With hair dyed a striking yellow with blotches of orange and hot pink and eyes painted tangerine and crimson, Taiwanese glam rocker Wednesday Wu is comfortable in her own skin. The creative director at Taiwanese apparel brand plain-me, Wu is also singer and lyricist for her band, Wednesday & Bad to the Bone. Wu says her appearance is not just a performance – she looks like this in everyday life. And though she stands out thanks to the explosion of colors she wears from head to toe, the 34-year-old says she does not enjoy being the center of attention. Watch the video above.
Taiwan’s Wednesday Addams
Young people in China are reviving old clothing, and maybe nationalism too
Across China, some young people are switching from jeans and T-shirts to long dresses, silky robes and black hats. They’re not cosplayers or period drama actors, but rather members of a booming movement to turn Hanfu, or ethnic Han clothing, into everyday wear. The so-called Hanfu movement has gained a large following among the ethnic Han Chinese group, which makes up more than 90% of the Chinese population. Supporters say Han people need traditional attires to celebrate their own ethnic identity, just like the kimono in Japan and the hanbok in Korea. Critics, however, have accused the movement of promoting Han supremacism and fuelling tensions between the country’s Han majority and ethnic m
Young people in China are reviving old clothing, and maybe nationalism too
The model from the Chinese D&G ad says sorry
The Chinese model who appeared in a series of Dolce & Gabbana advertisements decried as racist has apologized for her role in the videos, saying that it has “almost completely ruined” her career. Two months after the saga Zuo Ye, a recent graduate of South China Agricultural University, wrote on the social media network Weibo on Monday that she had not given enough thought to the content of the video and felt “very guilty and ashamed” about the ensuing uproar. “Personally I would never show any disrespect to my motherland. I love my country and feel proud to be able to represent China on the catwalk,” wrote Zuo. “I will draw a lesson from this and show the Chinese in a better light. Again, I
The model from the Chinese D&G ad says sorry
Why Dolce & Gabbana may die with a pair of chopsticks through its heart
To paraphrase the great Jedi master Yoda in Star Wars: Episode II – “Begun, the Chopstick War has just.” A week ago, the Italian luxury brand Dolce & Gabbana found itself under fire for releasing a series of web ads touting its first-ever major Chinese fashion event, “The Great Show.”  The ads feature a giggling Chinese model attempting to eat oversized Italian dishes — a tabletop pizza, a cannoli bigger than a man’s forearm and a punch bowl of red-sauce pasta — with a pair of chopsticks, as a male narrator pokes fun at her inability to deal with the “huge” food using her “little sticks.” The videos were understandably interpreted as racist and condescending, leading to Chinese calls for a D
Why Dolce & Gabbana may die with a pair of chopsticks through its heart
Dolce & Gabbana show canceled after racism claims
A Dolce & Gabbana fashion show originally set to take place in Shanghai on Wednesday was called off, after a debate around racism that enveloped both the label and one of its co-founders. In widely shared screenshots, the Instagram account of designer Stefano Gabbana, co-founder of the Italian luxury brand, was seen calling Chinese people “ignorant dirty smelling mafia” in a private conversation with another user. Gabbana has denied he made the remarks, adding that his Instagram account had been hacked. “I love China and the Chinese culture,” the designer said in a post on Wednesday.         View this post on Instagram                   My Instagram account has been hacked.
Dolce & Gabbana show canceled after racism claims