Politics

Politics

The primary election that resulted in Hong Kong’s national security mass arrests
The biggest mass arrests under the national security law in Hong Kong took place on Wednesday morning as 53 former opposition lawmakers and activists were rounded up for their roles in a primary election run-off last July. Inkstone looks at the controversial democratic primary and why it triggered Beijing’s ire. What was the opposition’s primary about? The 35-plus strategy was drafted by Benny Tai Yiu-ting in March last year. Tai was an organizer of the Occupy Central protests that ground the city to a halt for 79 days in 2014.  The primaries were organized to ensure those with the best chance could win votes and achieve a majority in the 70-seat legislature (or, 35-plus). This was to preve
Trump has put spotlight on pardons. How does it work in China? 
In his final weeks in office, US President Donald Trump has issued a wave of controversial pardons to family members, close allies and Blackwater guards who killed Iraqi civilians.  United Nations experts said the pardon of four Blackwater contractors violated international laws that obligate countries to hold their war criminals accountable for their crimes.  But controversial presidential pardons are hardly unique for outgoing presidents. US President Bill Clinton pardoned 176 people on his final day in office in 2001, including his brother. He received harsh blowback for the decision.  President George W. Bush appears to have learned from Clinton’s experience and issued a limited number o
Taiwan’s pork protest against the US
Thousands of people in Taiwan’s capital Taipei have joined an annual demonstration against the easing of restrictions against imports of American pork which contain a controversial food additive.
Rebel City: Hong Kong protest documentary lands on SCMP
The South China Morning Post, the parent company of Inkstone, is releasing a comprehensive new documentary about Hong Kong’s tumultuous anti-government protests of 2019, marking a year since a climactic showdown at a university campus. The hour-long production, titled China’s Rebel City, combines the access, expertise and on-the-ground reporting of award-winning Post journalists to deliver a no-holds-barred account of the events that pushed the city to the brink and reshaped its political landscape. The documentary, a companion piece to the book Rebel City: Hong Kong’s Year of Water and Fire, published in June, is being released in four parts. The first installment comes today on platform
Hong Kong lawmakers disqualified after a Beijing resolution
Four Hong Kong opposition lawmakers have been disqualified with immediate effect after China’s top legislative body passed a resolution giving local authorities the power to unseat politicians without having to go through the city’s judicial system. The legislators unseated on Wednesday were Alvin Yeung Ngok-kiu, Dennis Kwok, Kenneth Leung and Kwok Ka-ki, all members of the pro-democracy bloc. They had previously been banned from running in the 2020 legislative elections before the polls were postponed for one year because of the coronavirus pandemic.  A stipulation from China’s top legislative body, the National People’s Congress Standing Committee (NPCSC), said that lawmakers would immedia
US measures against Hong Kong unlikely to be rolled back under a Biden presidency, analysts say
Donald Trump’s earlier moves to sanction Hong Kong officials and end the city’s special trade status are unlikely to be rolled back, even if his challenger Joe Biden secures the US presidency, political watchers say. But while Biden was expected to press on with tough policies against China – especially in relation to technology and the economy – he was less likely to use Hong Kong as a pawn than his predecessor, and would be more inclined to return to diplomatic norms in the United States’ ongoing tussles with China, they added. “Biden will still have to deal with some of Trump’s legacies,” said Wilson Chan Wai-shun, secretary general of the Global Studies Institute (Hong Kong) think tank,
Asia greets tight US election with a giant shrug
The close US election, with the twists and turns involved in the vote-counting process – as well as seeming rival claims of victory – was a messy outcome anticipated by the region’s investors and political punditry. Speaking to South China Morning Post reporters across Asia, observers and analysts said a rising stock market on Wednesday and Thursday reflected the distinct lack of panic in the region. Still, there remained some anxiety about the knock-on effects for security in flashpoint regions such as the Taiwan Strait and the Korean peninsula if Washington remains distracted with internal politics for an extended period. As of press time, the outcome was being decided based on the final
How everyday Chinese people saw the US election
With several key states across the US still counting votes, the 2020 US presidential election remained undecided when Inkstone went to press on Wednesday evening in Asia.  Sitting president Donald Trump expressed confidence that he would win during a late-night press conference, citing advantages in key swing states. Democratic Party challenger Joe Biden told a crowd in Delaware that he believes “we’re on track to win this election” as millions of votes remain to be counted.   The US election is closely watched worldwide, as the outcome has ripple effects that stretch beyond its borders. In China, people have found it “exciting” and “entertaining” to watch the democratic process unfold, desp
China to ban more Australian imports
Wheat exported from Australia is expected to join a list of goods banned by China, which has already halted imports of barley, sugar, red wine, timber, coal, lobster, copper ore and copper concentrates from the country. Beijing’s latest actions came as tensions between the two nations escalated since April when Canberra pushed for an international inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus.
A fugitive tycoon is accused of a US presidential election misinformation campaign
In the run-up to the US presidential election, Chinese fugitive tycoon Guo Wengui is being accused of helping to promote unverified claims linking Democratic candidate Joe Biden to China.  Guo is most famous for making incendiary accusations against Beijing, fleeing China and finding sanctuary in the US.  The amplification of stories about Biden’s son Hunter and his alleged business ties to China was part of coordinated and sophisticated attempts to interfere with Tuesday’s US election, according to John Pan, a former collaborator with Guo, who is based in Australia. “Guo’s intention is to interfere with the US election,” Pan told the South China Morning Post in an interview. “He may not be