Inkstone
    Apr
    20
    2018
    Apr
    20
    2018
    Inside China’s empty rural schools
    Inside China’s empty rural schools
    SOCIETY

    Inside China’s empty rural schools

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    Tom Wang
    Tom Wang
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    Lumacha primary school used to have more than 300 students.

    Now there are only three.

    The school in China’s northwest Gansu province is among thousands of China’s rural villages affected by urbanization, as the region’s families leave their villages to move to the country’s rapidly expanding cities.

    There is an ever-growing divide between China’s rapidly emptying villages and its expanding cities.

    China's levels of urban migration are staggering. In 2017, there were an estimated 287 million migrant workers in the country – well over a third of the total workforce.

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    A recent report found there are 9,800 schools in northwest China’s Gansu province with fewer than 100 students, and 1,900 of those schools had fewer than 10 pupils.

    Feng Ping, principal of Lumacha primary school, worries about the future of the school – and of education in rural China.

    TOM WANG
    TOM WANG
    Tom Wang is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a Beijing-based video journalist.

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