Inkstone
    Mar
    30
    2018
    Mar
    30
    2018
    Religion across China
    Religion across China
    SOCIETY

    Religion across China

    Triangle 4
    arrow left
    arrow right
    by
    Adam White
    Adam White
    Subscribe to the Inkstone newsletter
    By registering you must agree to our T&Cs

    China is full of religions of all shapes and sizes – approved and clandestine.

    While the Cultural Revolution in the ’60s and ’70s actively targeted religious practices, religion has since made a comeback.

    Here are just a few of the forms of worship across a very, very large country.

    Monks at the Longwu Temple during Tibetan New Year. Tibetan Buddhism is widespread in the Tibetan plateau, as well as Mongolia and the Himalayas.
    Monks at the Longwu Temple during Tibetan New Year. Tibetan Buddhism is widespread in the Tibetan plateau, as well as Mongolia and the Himalayas. Photo: AFP / Johannes Eisele
    A Tibetan devotee prostrates herself at the Longwu Temple during Tibetan New Year.
    A Tibetan devotee prostrates herself at the Longwu Temple during Tibetan New Year. Photo: AFP / Johannes Eisele
    Subscribe to the Inkstone newsletter
    By registering you must agree to our T&Cs
    A Tibetan Buddhist monk dressed as a deity performs a ‘cham’ dance for Tibetan New Year. The dances are considered both meditations and offerings to the gods.
    A Tibetan Buddhist monk dressed as a deity performs a ‘cham’ dance for Tibetan New Year. The dances are considered both meditations and offerings to the gods. Photo: AFP / Johannes Eisele
    Worshippers of the God of Fortune burn incense for the Lunar New Year at Guiyuan Temple in Wuhan, Hubei province.
    Worshippers of the God of Fortune burn incense for the Lunar New Year at Guiyuan Temple in Wuhan, Hubei province. Photo: Reuters
    People burn incense sticks during the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong. The festival, which is primarily celebrated in southern China, commemorates the period when restless spirits cross into the world of the living, where they must be appeased with offerings.
    People burn incense sticks during the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong. The festival, which is primarily celebrated in southern China, commemorates the period when restless spirits cross into the world of the living, where they must be appeased with offerings.
    Muslim men await afternoon prayers outside a mosque in northern Gansu province, which is home to a large population of ethnic minority Hui Muslims.
    Muslim men await afternoon prayers outside a mosque in northern Gansu province, which is home to a large population of ethnic minority Hui Muslims. Photo: Reuters/Michael Martina
    Chinese Muslims walk out of a prayer hall after prayers on the first day of Ramadan at the Niujie Mosque in Beijing. China is home to more than 21 million Muslims.
    Chinese Muslims walk out of a prayer hall after prayers on the first day of Ramadan at the Niujie Mosque in Beijing. China is home to more than 21 million Muslims. Photo: EPA/How Hwee-young
    An arial photo of tables in eastern Fujian province, prepared for a ceremony to celebrate the birth of the Jade Emperor, Taoism’s supreme deity.
    An arial photo of tables in eastern Fujian province, prepared for a ceremony to celebrate the birth of the Jade Emperor, Taoism’s supreme deity. Photo: AFP
    Tourists gather for the sunrise at the Golden Palace at summit of Wudang Mountain, the birthplace of Taoist culture.
    Tourists gather for the sunrise at the Golden Palace at summit of Wudang Mountain, the birthplace of Taoist culture. Photo: Xinhua/Chen Yehua
    ADAM WHITE
    ADAM WHITE
    Adam White is a contributor to Inkstone. The Hong Kong­-born-and-raised journalist and editor has written for CNN, Time, Monocle, HK Magazine and the New Statesman.

    ADAM WHITE
    ADAM WHITE
    Adam White is a contributor to Inkstone. The Hong Kong­-born-and-raised journalist and editor has written for CNN, Time, Monocle, HK Magazine and the New Statesman.

    arrow right
      Rotate the screen
      Please rotate for best experience.
      Your privacy is important. We wish to inform you what data we collect from you and how we process such data. Our Privacy Notice aims to comply with all relevant data privacy and protection laws. You should read the Privacy Notice in full here.