Sports

Sports

2020 Tokyo Olympics postponed for one year
The 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo have officially been postponed because of health concerns stemming from the coronavirus pandemic. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he asked for a one-year postponement and the International Olympic Committee has agreed.
‘Striking’ lack of regret led to Chinese star swimmer Sun Yang’s doping ban
Chinese superstar swimmer Sun Yang paid for the “huge risk” he took in the controversial doping test that led to him being banned for eight years by the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The court on Wednesday published its full report into the case brought by the World Anti-Doping Agency against Sun Yang and swimming governing body Fina, with the 78-page document making for damning reading. The report is highly critical of Sun and his team for their actions from the out-of-competition test at his home in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou in September 2018 through to the end of the CAS hearing last November. On the night of testing, Sun gave a blood sample before taking issue with the cred
Tokyo Olympics mean a lot more to Japan than a sporting spectacle
Japan has far more at stake than its athletes picking up medals in the upcoming Tokyo Olympic Games and Paralympics, which explains the government’s single-minded commitment to going ahead with the event in the face of the threat posed by the novel coronavirus. The Japanese government on Wednesday reiterated that the Games would go ahead in July as scheduled, with chief cabinet secretary Yoshihide Suga declaring that preparations were continuing despite the spread of the virus worldwide. The previous day, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) threw its weight behind Tokyo’s position. “We are preparing for a successful Olympic Games, Tokyo 2020,” said IOC head Thomas Bach. “I would like t
European soccer is winning Chinese social media despite controversies
Barcelona, Cristiano Ronaldo and the English Premier League were the big winners in a soccer popularity survey of the Chinese digital market. According to the annual Red Card Report, Chelsea became the Premier League’s most successful team in China, leapfrogging champions Manchester City and former favorites Manchester United. There was good news for United, as they remain the most-followed international team on Weibo, China's version of Twitter. Their former player, Cristiano Ronaldo, is the most-followed foreign footballer on the platform and also bucked the trend of decreased engagement and followers for players on Weibo. Now in its ninth year, the Red Card Report is published by digital
Jetmen push boundaries in the skies above China
Daredevil “jetmen” jumped out of a plane with small jet engines strapped to their backs for a stunt flight over the dramatic scenery of Zhangjiajie, in China’s central province of Hunan. For their flight on November 14, 2019, they used carbon fiber wings with attached jetpacks to zip around at speeds up to 250mph. The demonstration was part of Expo 2020 Dubai’s “Mission: Human Flight” program, which aims to develop equipment that ultimately allows “fully autonomous human flight.”
No deal and no name as German soccer counts the cost of China backlash
A German soccer club and one of the country’s star players are feeling the heat from China.  News emerged over the weekend that Bundesliga side Cologne lost a deal with a Chinese gambling sponsor. Meanwhile, state-controlled Chinese media are still blacklisting Arsenal star and former German international player Mesut Özil. According to Cologne newspaper Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger, the loss for the postponed deal was about $1.66 million.  The club did not offer comment but confirmed that the sponsors from China had withdrawn the potential deal, reported Deutsche Welle online. Cologne made headlines last month when they chose to postpone a joint academy with the Chinese soccer club Liaoning.  The
The ‘Linsanity’ of Jeremy Lin's hairdos over the years
As Jeremy Lin tears up the Chinese Basketball Association this season for the Beijing Ducks, he’s returned to form in many ways. One of the most notable – aesthetically speaking – is his haircut. With shaved sides and a short, straight top, his Beijing styling looks somewhat similar to his hair during the “Linsanity” craze, when the Taiwanese-American first shot to fame in the NBA in 2011. Lin has long been a style icon off the court, setting trends with his fashion sense and his eclectic, sometimes controversial, hairstyles.  Here we’ve collected a definitive list of his most memorable hairdos, in chronological order. Palo Alto: The So Cal Beginnings         View this post on Insta
‘There are values higher than money’: German soccer club scraps China deal
German soccer club FC Cologne has pulled out of a $2 million deal to run a football academy in northeast China, as a member of the club council said they should not support “such a totalitarian and brutal dictatorship.” Cologne’s president, Werner Wolf, told the local paper Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger on Wednesday that the Bundesliga club had decided not to proceed with the project. Stefan Müller-Römer, a member of the club council, told the paper: “I understand that the Federal Republic of Germany cannot get past the economic power of China completely and so there is an exchange. But we don’t need China in sports.” He also said that human rights in China were being massively disregarded and a su
China’s ‘Mad Dog’ fighter enters the battle of his life
The 41-year-old mixed martial arts fighter Xu Xiaodong has been a controversial figure in China ever since he became famous for beating up what he called “fake” kung fu masters. Unafraid to talk about almost anything, his brash attitude has brought him stardom but also unexpected – and unwelcome – knocks on his door. In November, he set out to prove that he’s more than a tough guy who dared to challenge a cherished Chinese tradition. In the video above, Inkstone follows Xu, nicknamed “Mad Dog,” as he fights the biggest fights of his career, for fame and freedom.  Subscribe to our YouTube channel for more stories about life, culture and politics in China.
Soccer star sparks controversy with Xinjiang social media posts
Arsenal midfielder Mesut Özil has become the latest international celebrity caught in a political storm in China after he strongly criticized Beijing’s policies in Xinjiang. The German soccer player hit out at the Muslim world’s silence over allegations of widespread human rights abuses in the far western region, where a million mainly Uygur Muslims have reportedly been detained in re-education camps. The comments prompted a backlash from Chinese newspapers and social media users, some of whom accused him of “hurting the feelings of the Chinese people.” China’s state broadcaster CCTV did not air Arsenal’s Sunday matchup against Manchester City. Özil, whose family originates from Turkey, pos