Style

Style

China’s resale sneaker business drives soaring prices
In China, the craze for buying sneakers is at a fever pitch. With the growth of digital platforms, fueled by China’s deep love for basketball, the resale sneaker business is growing and enthusiasts are driving soaring prices on online “sneaker exchange” platforms.
China’s resale sneaker business drives soaring prices
Inside China’s booming streetwear scene
Even though streetwear brand Supreme doesn't have a single store in China, you'll probably see it in almost every major Chinese city. While the brand selling "Supreme" in China might not be the original from New York, it is a testament to the immense popularity of streetwear in China. Last year, Chinese spending on luxury streetwear goods rose by 62%.  And as the industry grows, foreign brands are trying to capitalize, while Chinese streetwear labels aim to expand abroad. In the video above, we dive into the Chinese hypebeast scene and see how streetwear is growing among China's young, wealthy people.
Inside China’s booming streetwear scene
Chinese barber turns heads with shaving art
Wang Jianfeng is no ordinary barber – he sculpts faces of celebrities onto the backs of his customers’ heads. He serves around eight to 10 clients a month with haircuts that depict the likes of Chairman Mao and former England soccer star David Beckham. Inspired by the famous American hair artist Rob Ferrel, the barber in eastern China’s Zhejiang province started doing hair art in 2015. Watch the video, above, for more.
Chinese barber turns heads with shaving art
Stylin’ Beijing
The Fall/Winter edition of China Fashion Week has just wrapped up in Beijing. The week-long event, which has been running for some 22 years, saw designers from across China present their work to the world. Check out our gallery, above, for a taste.
Stylin’ Beijing
Inside China’s multibillion-dollar influencer market
For the Lunar New Year in February, China’s ubiquitous mobile payment service WeChat Pay hired Becky Li to be a “chief experience officer,” showing off how easy it was to pay for things with your phone, even when traveling overseas. “I thought WeChat would hire a celebrity,” said Li in her office in the heart of Guangzhou. Li is no pop star or TV personality. But in a way, she’s exactly the kind of celebrity that brands increasingly lust after. With more than 7.5 million combined followers on social media platforms WeChat and Weibo, Li is one of China’s top fashion bloggers. She’s one of China’s influencers, known locally as KOLs – key opinion leaders – who have been able to convert fans an
Inside China’s multibillion-dollar influencer market
The model ‘uglifying China’ with her freckles
International fashion brand Zara has come under fire in China for using one of the country’s top models in a makeup commercial without first covering up her freckles. Some social media users on Weibo, the Chinese version of Twitter, accused the Spanish company of “uglifying China” by depicting Li Jingwen with little make-up and clearly visible freckles in its advertisement, released on Friday. Li Jingwen is one of China’s top models, and rose to prominence partly thanks to her distinctive freckles. But most Chinese women lack them, leading some internet users to question why the brand would choose her likeness to sell cosmetics. “Does it mean that us Asian women all have dull eyes and have
The model ‘uglifying China’ with her freckles
The model from the Chinese D&G ad says sorry
The Chinese model who appeared in a series of Dolce & Gabbana advertisements decried as racist has apologized for her role in the videos, saying that it has “almost completely ruined” her career. Two months after the saga Zuo Ye, a recent graduate of South China Agricultural University, wrote on the social media network Weibo on Monday that she had not given enough thought to the content of the video and felt “very guilty and ashamed” about the ensuing uproar. “Personally I would never show any disrespect to my motherland. I love my country and feel proud to be able to represent China on the catwalk,” wrote Zuo. “I will draw a lesson from this and show the Chinese in a better light. Again, I
The model from the Chinese D&G ad says sorry
The women who say China is ready for plus-size
It wasn’t Drake, ice buckets or falling out of cars. Two and a half years ago, the biggest viral fad in China was the A4 waist challenge: in which young Chinese women held up an A4 sheet of paper to their tiny torsos, to prove their waists were smaller than the paper. The social media contests drew raised eyebrows from Western and Chinese observers concerned about body shaming, but in mainstream media, China’s traditional beauty standards barely wavered. But now a handful of confident international fashion influencers are determined to give plus-sized women in China a voice.         View this post on Instagram                   #outfitoftheday #plussize #fashion #ootd #yello
The women who say China is ready for plus-size