Style

Style

Can Chinese fashion labels achieve global success?
China buys, produces and exports most of the world’s clothing, but most Western consumers would struggle to name a Chinese fashion brand. This begs the question: why are Chinese labels still struggling to find the spotlight? Xiaofeng Gu, a fashion marketing expert living between San Francisco and Shanghai, believes the absence of Chinese designers from the global fashion stage comes down to a combination of complacency and high cultural barriers. “China’s domestic market is so big that many brands are simply not motivated to make a global expansion,” he says. “Marketing to Western audiences is another challenge – I have seen a few shows staged by Chinese fashion brands at major fashion weeks
Can Chinese fashion labels achieve global success?
The rise and fall of Hong Kong socialite Azura
On October 15, 2018, 46-year-old tech expert Jason, from New York, flew to Hong Kong on a week-long business trip.  He checked into a room at the Four Seasons, in Central, and when a lunch appointment was canceled, he happily nursed an afternoon drink at the hotel’s Pool Bar. “Then I looked up,” he recalls, “and this incredible, striking woman walked in.” Jason remembers her warmly embracing the waitstaff, who responded with a fawning adoration reserved for regular clients. “She was shown to the table next to me, we made eye contact, she smiled, and that was it,” Jason says. Newly separated from his wife, his enchantment could be forgiven. Her lips were full, her flowing, lust­rous hair fram
The rise and fall of Hong Kong socialite Azura
China’s resale sneaker business drives soaring prices
In China, the craze for buying sneakers is at a fever pitch. With the growth of digital platforms, fueled by China’s deep love for basketball, the resale sneaker business is growing and enthusiasts are driving soaring prices on online “sneaker exchange” platforms.
China’s resale sneaker business drives soaring prices
Inside China’s booming streetwear scene
Even though streetwear brand Supreme doesn't have a single store in China, you'll probably see it in almost every major Chinese city. While the brand selling "Supreme" in China might not be the original from New York, it is a testament to the immense popularity of streetwear in China. Last year, Chinese spending on luxury streetwear goods rose by 62%.  And as the industry grows, foreign brands are trying to capitalize, while Chinese streetwear labels aim to expand abroad. In the video above, we dive into the Chinese hypebeast scene and see how streetwear is growing among China's young, wealthy people.
Inside China’s booming streetwear scene
Chinese barber turns heads with shaving art
Wang Jianfeng is no ordinary barber – he sculpts faces of celebrities onto the backs of his customers’ heads. He serves around eight to 10 clients a month with haircuts that depict the likes of Chairman Mao and former England soccer star David Beckham. Inspired by the famous American hair artist Rob Ferrel, the barber in eastern China’s Zhejiang province started doing hair art in 2015. Watch the video, above, for more.
Chinese barber turns heads with shaving art
Stylin’ Beijing
The Fall/Winter edition of China Fashion Week has just wrapped up in Beijing. The week-long event, which has been running for some 22 years, saw designers from across China present their work to the world. Check out our gallery, above, for a taste.
Stylin’ Beijing
Inside China’s multibillion-dollar influencer market
For the Lunar New Year in February, China’s ubiquitous mobile payment service WeChat Pay hired Becky Li to be a “chief experience officer,” showing off how easy it was to pay for things with your phone, even when traveling overseas. “I thought WeChat would hire a celebrity,” said Li in her office in the heart of Guangzhou. Li is no pop star or TV personality. But in a way, she’s exactly the kind of celebrity that brands increasingly lust after. With more than 7.5 million combined followers on social media platforms WeChat and Weibo, Li is one of China’s top fashion bloggers. She’s one of China’s influencers, known locally as KOLs – key opinion leaders – who have been able to convert fans an
Inside China’s multibillion-dollar influencer market
The model ‘uglifying China’ with her freckles
International fashion brand Zara has come under fire in China for using one of the country’s top models in a makeup commercial without first covering up her freckles. Some social media users on Weibo, the Chinese version of Twitter, accused the Spanish company of “uglifying China” by depicting Li Jingwen with little make-up and clearly visible freckles in its advertisement, released on Friday. Li Jingwen is one of China’s top models, and rose to prominence partly thanks to her distinctive freckles. But most Chinese women lack them, leading some internet users to question why the brand would choose her likeness to sell cosmetics. “Does it mean that us Asian women all have dull eyes and have
The model ‘uglifying China’ with her freckles