2020 US presidential election

2020 US presidential election

The 2020 presidential election between President Donald Trump and former Vice-President Joe Biden will have global consequences.

Asia greets tight US election with a giant shrug
The close US election, with the twists and turns involved in the vote-counting process – as well as seeming rival claims of victory – was a messy outcome anticipated by the region’s investors and political punditry. Speaking to South China Morning Post reporters across Asia, observers and analysts said a rising stock market on Wednesday and Thursday reflected the distinct lack of panic in the region. Still, there remained some anxiety about the knock-on effects for security in flashpoint regions such as the Taiwan Strait and the Korean peninsula if Washington remains distracted with internal politics for an extended period. As of press time, the outcome was being decided based on the final
How everyday Chinese people saw the US election
With several key states across the US still counting votes, the 2020 US presidential election remained undecided when Inkstone went to press on Wednesday evening in Asia.  Sitting president Donald Trump expressed confidence that he would win during a late-night press conference, citing advantages in key swing states. Democratic Party challenger Joe Biden told a crowd in Delaware that he believes “we’re on track to win this election” as millions of votes remain to be counted.   The US election is closely watched worldwide, as the outcome has ripple effects that stretch beyond its borders. In China, people have found it “exciting” and “entertaining” to watch the democratic process unfold, desp
A fugitive tycoon is accused of a US presidential election misinformation campaign
In the run-up to the US presidential election, Chinese fugitive tycoon Guo Wengui is being accused of helping to promote unverified claims linking Democratic candidate Joe Biden to China.  Guo is most famous for making incendiary accusations against Beijing, fleeing China and finding sanctuary in the US.  The amplification of stories about Biden’s son Hunter and his alleged business ties to China was part of coordinated and sophisticated attempts to interfere with Tuesday’s US election, according to John Pan, a former collaborator with Guo, who is based in Australia. “Guo’s intention is to interfere with the US election,” Pan told the South China Morning Post in an interview. “He may not be
‘Shy Trump voters' may prove decisive in 2020
US President Donald Trump stirred controversy on Sunday when he tweeted out a video of a fleet of trucks, flying Trump flags, apparently harassing a campaign bus for the campaign of candidate Joe Biden.  This political brashness has manifested itself in the US with Trump boat parties, sales of memorabilia far outstripping Biden gear and political rallies that are attended by thousands despite the country being the global center of the coronavirus pandemic.  But these people are unlikely to worry Biden supporters. They have already been “priced in” as the core of Trump’s base.  The unknowable potential voter block is the “shy Trump supporter”: those who are traditionally apolitical but have f
US election: why China doesn’t mind its citizens watching democracy at work
Every morning since September, Frank Fu has started the day with a cup of coffee and news about the US presidential election. Fu, 45, a business analyst with an American financial institution in Beijing, has never been so keen to follow an election. Although he lives behind “the Great Firewall” along with most of China’s 1.4 billion people, whose access to foreign media is largely blocked, Fu tries to form a picture of what future US-China trade relations will look like despite the mostly censored and limited information available domestically. “As far as I know, many Chinese like me have an unprecedented interest in the election because China’s fate will be more intertwined with the United
China is contentious topic for US Senate and Congress candidates
In the 2020 US election, China has become an issue not just in the presidential race but also at the state and local levels. As President Donald Trump and former vice-president Joe Biden have sparred over who would be tougher against Beijing, candidates up and down the ballot have campaigned on concerns about China and Chinese influence. From Trump strongholds Montana and Georgia to swing states like Florida and Pennsylvania, candidates have sought to one-up their opponents with talking points such as Beijing’s culpability in the coronavirus pandemic, the US trade imbalance with China, and Chinese influence and interference in the United States. Montana In Montana, one issue is just how stro
Why China’s liberals like Trump
On the night of April 25, 2012, a bright yellow phone in Hillary Clinton’s home in northwest Washington rang. An urgent crisis was unfolding in the streets of Beijing, the former secretary of state learned on the secure call, and she had to act fast. In a move that risked angering China, she authorized an operation to pick up a Chinese dissident and shelter him in the US embassy. “Go get him,” Hillary recalled telling her staff in her 2014 memoir. The decision, she wrote, demonstrated America as a “beacon of freedom and opportunity.” Eight years later, on August 26, Chen Guangcheng, the Chinese rights activist whom the Obama administration eventually helped escape to America, spoke at the Re
Presidential debate: Donald Trump blames ‘China plague’ for US economic woes
US President Donald Trump used Tuesday’s first pre-election television debate to lay the blame for his country’s economic woes on China and recycle unsubstantiated claims that his challenger, Joe Biden, was beholden to China because of his son’s business dealings in the country. “We built the greatest economy in history, we closed it down because of the China plague,” said Trump, using language that rights groups have condemned for fanning the flames of anti-Asian racism in the US. Though not asked directly about China during Tuesday’s debate, before a socially distanced audience of about 80 people in Cleveland, Ohio, both candidates proactively brought it up as they attacked each other on i
Presidential election proves a nail-biter for those caught in crossfire of US-China rivalry
If Donald Trump and Joe Biden are to be believed, the upcoming presidential election is the most consequential in American history. But the race is also being closely watched around the world and few are following more closely than those whose lives and livelihoods are wrapped up in the US-China relationship. A seemingly endless cascade of actions in recent weeks – ranging from sanctions against Chinese officials over human rights abuses and their handling of Hong Kong, to stand-offs over Chinese tech companies – has seen relations fray to their most precarious in decades. To many caught in the middle, the prospect of a new administration in January provides the possibility of a pause, but
Trump and Biden both vow to reduce reliance on China, but methods will be ‘night and day’
In his Mexico City office, while the coronavirus pandemic has raged, Samuel Campos’s phone has been ringing off the hook with firms looking to move their manufacturing to Mexico. “Since the trade deal this year, I think our volume is up around 30% to 40%,” said Campos, managing director at commercial real estate advisory firm Newmark Knight Frank, pointing to the revamped US-Mexico-Canada Agreement that went into effect in July. The callers used to be mainly European and American, looking to escape China to avoid trade war tariffs or to be closer to their consumer markets. But in recent months, Chinese firms have been calling too – all keen on managing the costs and volatility that come with