Animal rights in China

Animal rights in China

Cruel ‘lucky bag of pets’ scheme sparks animal rights concerns
In China, animal rights groups are up in arms over a “reprehensible” trend of selling “lucky bags” of pets in the mail. While the practice of sending animals through China’s mail service is illegal, unscrupulous vendors are flouting the rules, selling animals for little more than a dollar. “Would you put a three-year-old child in a gift box?”, said Isobel Zhang, co-founder of the Chinese brand of ACTAsia, a British charity that promotes animal welfare throughout the Asia-Pacific region. The marketing gimmick allows consumers to choose the type of pet they want, but not the breed, color or size, so they get the thrill of a surprise when it arrives.  The practice has its origins in the Japane
The strange, ridiculous and cruel dog ownership rules in China
From dog-walking bans to cash rewards for people who kill stray dogs, the attempt by grassroots community managers in China to control the country’s booming dog population is often at odds with the growing popularity of pet ownership. And despite complaints from non-pet owners, the central government appears ready to embrace a pet-friendly future. In April, China’s Ministry of Agriculture explicitly stated for the first time that dogs are “companions” and not “livestock.” But only 22% of households own a pet, a number that is expected to grow in the coming years, according to Alizila, a blog from Alibaba (which owns Inkstone). The growth of pet ownership creates teething issues in China as
Walking your dog could get your dog killed in Yunnan
A Chinese county is reconsidering a controversial policy that would have required authorities to capture and kill dogs if their owner walked them in public three times. In a notice published last week, Weixin county in the southwestern province of Yunnan said all dogs must be kept in captivity and it issued harsh punishments for people who violated the new rule.   First-time “dog walker” offenders would be subject to warnings while people caught a second time could be fined between 50 to 200 yuan ($7.6 to $30.5).  But if someone is caught walking their dog in public three times, their pets will be captured and then killed. The harsh regulation triggered a wave of criticism online.  “When hav
Blackpink finds themselves in panda diplomacy storm
The superstar K-pop group Blackpink has found itself in hot water in China. But it has nothing to do with politics; it’s all about pandas. The girl group posted a video of them touching the panda bears without wearing a mask or gloves. The China Wildlife Conservation Association, the country’s semi-official wildlife conservation association, issued a statement demanding the zoo stop such commercial activities and not air the video. In China, the video drew fierce criticism online as people complained that the group had put the bear at risk of disease. Panda keepers and feeders are prohibited from wearing jewelry and makeup when touching the animals. In the clip, Blackpink member Jennie was
Chinese dog meat feast going strong despite pressure to end trade
Dog meat lovers are returning in full force for a season of feasting in the southern Chinese city of Yulin despite pressure rising across the country to end the trade after the Covid-19 pandemic focused attention on China’s meat consumption. “The scale of the dog meat trade in Yulin is pretty much the same compared to previous years,” said animal welfare advocate Yu Dezhi. Yu surveyed the city, in the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, in May. The central government has banned the wildlife trade to curb the transmission of animal diseases to humans after the new coronavirus was suspected to have originated in bats and then jumped to people through an intermediary animal. The southern cities o
Is China’s wildlife ban enough to prevent the next epidemic?
Soon after the central Chinese city of Wuhan went into lockdown two months ago, the central government fast-tracked a ban on the trade and consumption of wildlife. The coronavirus that has killed tens of thousands of people around the world first emerged in the city and many of the early patients were linked to the Huashan Seafood Wholesale Market, which sold wild animals. Research suggests that the virus came from bats, and likely went through an intermediate host, possibly pangolins, before reaching humans. The national ban – as well as others around the world – is an attempt to stop a similar pandemic disease from animals. But while the ban has been welcomed, health specialists say that b
The hard part of banning the consumption of wild animals? Defining them
Turtle soup, rice porridge with frog, snake soup, frog leg clay pot rice – could popular dishes in Chinese cuisine like these be off restaurant menus in China for good? That’s the worry of chefs, food critics and restaurant owners after the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, China’s top lawmaking body, banned the trade and consumption of wild animals in late February as part of measures to contain the coronavirus outbreak. The consumption of wild animals has drawn much government scrutiny, as both the current epidemic and the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) have been associated with markets in China selling meat from wild animals. The Sars virus o
Rescuers are knocking down doors to save pets locked down and starving in Wuhan
Animal rescuers are racing against the clock to save thousands of pets left alone in the central city of Wuhan after a lockdown prevented their owners from returning to their homes. A vet working in Wuhan said his rescue group has saved more than 2,000 pets from around the city since January 23, when the city went into lockdown to prevent the spread of the coronavirus outbreak that has killed about 500 people worldwide. “The pets were found in homes with no food and water,” said the member of Wuhan Pet Life Online, who prefers to remain anonymous. “Their owners left their houses last month not expecting that they would not be able to return home. Pets are beginning to starve to death or die
The depleted Yangtze, Asia’s longest river, gets a 10-year fishing ban
China has imposed a 10-year commercial fishing ban in the Yangtze – the first ever for Asia’s longest river – in a bid to protect its aquatic life. Facing dwindling fish stocks and declining biodiversity in the 3,915-mile river, the Chinese government decided seasonal moratoriums were not enough. The ban took effect on Wednesday, and will be applied at 332 conservation sites along the river.  It will be extended to cover the main river course and key tributaries by January 1 next year, according to a State Council notice. “The Yangtze is a major river in the world in terms of its aquatic species diversity. It is also an important shield for protecting our country’s ecology and improving cons
Chinese pet detective reunites lost furry friends with owners
If your beloved furry friend goes missing in China, hiring a pet detective is now a way to increase your chances of a happy reunion. Equipped with hi-tech investigative tools, Shanghai-based private sleuth Sun Jinrong is handling cases across the country.  In about seven years of pet detecting, he has found about 1,000 wayward animals and claims a success rate of 60-70%.