‘Fire phoenix’ spotted in central China
They're as beautiful as peacocks. The brilliantly colored golden pheasants have been made a rare appearance in their snowy habitat in China’s central province of Henan. The reclusive bird, also known as the “fire phoenix” or Chinese pheasant, is a Class II protected species in China because their numbers have been decreasing.
‘Fire phoenix’ spotted in central China
A deadly pig virus has spread all over China
A swine fever epidemic has spread to all parts of China, decimating the country’s hog industry and disrupting Chinese dinner tables. The island province of Hainan has confirmed its first cases of African swine fever, meaning the pig-killing virus has spread to all 31 mainland Chinese provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions since the first infection in the country was confirmed in August. The spread of African swine fever has disrupted the supply of pork in China, which raises about half the world's pigs. Financial services firm Rabobank estimates that China is set to lose up to 200 million pigs to the disease or culling, and there is not enough pork in "the whole world combined" to
A deadly pig virus has spread all over China
How the fairy bird came back from the brink of extinction
With its red claws and face – plus a large, curved black beak and crest – the crested ibis is known as the “beauty bird” or “fairy bird” in China.  But five decades ago the crested ibis’s future looked bleak. At one point, the entire species around the world was thought to be down to the last six birds.  But thanks to the efforts of dogged Chinese conservationists, it has made a remarkable comeback.  Some 50 years after it was on the brink of extinction, the number of crested ibises in China reached more than 2,600 in January this year. The species is still endangered, but its revival is a conservation success story. Back in the 1960s, things seemed hopeless. The last crested ibis to be spo
How the fairy bird came back from the brink of extinction
Why aren't animals protected in China?
It's the latest case of animal abuse to go viral in China. In a widely circulated video, a smartly dressed young man smashes the head of a white kitten on a sidewalk in the eastern city of Nanjing. A Chinese news site, Kankannews.com, reported that the unnamed man had demanded a refund from the pet shop where he had purchased the kitten, claiming that he had been sold a sick animal. It's unclear what happened to the man, but he is unlikely to be punished.  China has no law against animal cruelty, and stories of brutal abuse are frequently reported across the country. In January, surveillance footage showed a Shanghai man killing a stray cat by kicking it and throwing it to the ground, media
Why aren't animals protected in China?
Jackie Chan and Yao Ming want you to stop buying shark’s fin
Chinese superstars Jackie Chan and Yao Ming have called on global consumers to quit buying products sourced from wild animals. In billboard ads, they urge people to boycott anything made of ivory, rhino horn or shark fin. ​ The global campaign, a joint effort from conservation organization WildAid and ad company JCDecaux, also features Prince William and Richard Branson. By the end of this year, the ads will be displayed in more than 10 countries. China is a big focus of the campaign. More than 600 billboards featuring former NBA player Yao have already been displayed in Beijing and other major cities. Even though shark fin doesn't taste of anything and contains little nutritional value, it
Jackie Chan and Yao Ming want you to stop buying shark’s fin
Man raises Asian black bear as family dog
They say that love is blind. But at some point, you have to admit that you’ve accidentally spent the last four years raising a bear. A Chinese man handed his pet dog over to a local animal welfare center last week… after it emerged that he had been taking care of an Asian black bear all long.  A social media post brought his mistake to the attention of the authorities. Police found the 176-pound bear in a cage at the man’s home in a rural corner of southwestern China’s Yunnan province, at the end of last month, China News Service reported on Monday. The owner was quoted as saying he found a “doglike animal” in April 2015 while he was foraging for mushrooms in the mountains near his home. He
Man raises Asian black bear as family dog
‘Smoking cats’: young Chinese are discovering their love for pets
When 24-year-old Li Yuhang finishes a long shift at the IT firm where he works, he knows something warm and fluffy is waiting at home – his Siamese cat, Ruby. The programmer likes to “smoke cat” – a term Chinese millennials use to describe their addictive obsession with petting, playing with, snuggling or simply enjoying the smell of their pets. Li, who lives in a shared apartment in Shenzhen, a city often described as China’s Silicon Valley, bought the cat last year and named it Ruby after the “beautiful” programming language. “It would be lonely living in this city by myself,” Li says. “Ruby is like my daughter.” Having grown up in a China where pets were considered a luxury, young people
‘Smoking cats’: young Chinese are discovering their love for pets