Antique markets

Antique markets

The daunting task of repairing antique Chinese texts
Over the past decade, a millennial fascinated with rare books has painstakingly restored dozens of frayed, rotten and torn manuscripts – all by hand. Lian Chengchun, 32, is one of a dwindling number of people who make a living by fixing ancient Chinese books. China classifies antique books as those printed before 1912. According to one report, there are an estimated 50 million in China, and only about 20 million have been preserved, creating a daunting task for antique book fixers like Lian. “Some books have rotted, some are aged, some have water damage, and some cannot even be opened properly,” Lian says. “Some books are especially hard to fix, such as ones that are infested with bugs or h
Beijing’s last ‘ghost market’
The Daliushu market in Beijing opens every Tuesday night as darkness falls in the Chinese capital, only to close before dawn the next day.  They're known as “ghost markets” among locals because they open only at night. The market features stalls selling antiques, jade and housewares.  While Beijing was once home to several nighttime markets, Daliushu is the only one that remains.