Breaking news and analysis on China’s economy, including its opening up, the US-China trade war, the impact of tariffs and trade talks, growth rates and other key economic data, the Belt and Road Init

iative, and Greater Bay Area plan.

How does the world see China's rise? It's complicated
China’s growing economic strength is seen by most people as positive, but the country’s rise as a global superpower is not making it popular with neighbors in the Asia-Pacific, a survey released on Thursday showed. The survey of nearly 39,000 people in 34 countries by the Pew Research Center also showed the world had an overwhelmingly negative view of Chinese President Xi Jinping. Over the past 70 years, China has transformed itself from an economic backwater to the world’s second-largest economy and a major source of investment around the world. Some 58% of people across 16 countries recognized China’s strong economy as mutually beneficial, while 52% said they see Chinese investment as posi
How does the world see China's rise? It's complicated
6 differences between Chinese and American shoppers on ‘Black Friday’
The end of the year is a busy time for shoppers in two of the largest consumer markets in the world.  In China, consumers snap up billions of dollars of purchases on what is known as the Singles’ Day festival – effectively the country’s “Black Friday” – every year, feeding a seemingly insatiable appetite for online shopping.  They spent a record-breaking $38.4 billion on Singles’ Day, November 11, this year.  The same month, consumers in the US embarked on the yearly Black Friday shopping frenzy, the day after Thanksgiving. American shoppers have been known to elbow each other and even get into fights in their attempts to grab heavily discounted flat-screen televisions or Xbox gaming console
6 differences between Chinese and American shoppers on ‘Black Friday’
24,000 government jobs up for grabs in China. 1.4 million people applied
Imagine taking a job test with only a 1-in-60 chance of landing the gig.  That is the reality for the Chinese public service exam, or guokao in Mandarin. More than 1.4 million people took the test on Sunday in the hopes of landing one of 24,000 available government jobs. The hotly contested annual event advertised positions from 86 central government agencies and 23 institutions directly attached to them. Successful candidates would start their positions early next year, China News reported. This year’s 1.44 million registered test-takers represented a 4% increase from last year, but fell below the 1.66 million who took the exam in 2017, the report said. The guokao has long been a big draw
24,000 government jobs up for grabs in China. 1.4 million people applied
Chinese GDP growth to fall below 6% in 2020, says think tank
China’s economic growth rate will dip below 6.0% next year, according to a major think tank in Beijing. The country is a key driver of global growth, so its economic performance is likely to have far-reaching consequences for trading partners around the world. The Beijing-based National Institution for Finance and Development (NIFD) was the first government-linked think tank to make a prediction of sub-6% growth. It said on Wednesday that China’s economic growth rate would slow to 5.8% in 2020 from an estimated 6.1% this year. This year’s growth forecast is near the lower end of the range between 6% to 6.5% growth that the Chinese government is targeting for 2019. The declining trend undersc
Chinese GDP growth to fall below 6% in 2020, says think tank
One of China’s most expensive cities is focusing on public housing
As weekly protests have continued to rock Hong Kong, the city’s authorities have pinned down one thing more than any other as the economic cause of the unrest: unaffordable housing. Across the border from the semi-autonomous city, the southern tech hub of Shenzhen in mainland China is trying to avoid its neighbor’s woes. Hong Kong has the world's most unaffordable property prices. Shenzhen is eschewing Hong Kong's housing model in favor of a system that focuses on affordable public housing. As part of its latest housing reform, the municipal government this week published a rule setting a benchmark land price across the city and stipulating that land sold for subsidized housing should be pri
One of China’s most expensive cities is focusing on public housing
The surprising place some Korean women are going for a career boost
It takes less than two hours to fly from Seoul to Shanghai. The capital of South Korea and one of China’s largest cities are separated by a mere 500 miles, but the differences between the two Asian giants are clear. South Korea is a democracy that elected its first female president, Park Geun-hye, in February 2013. China, meanwhile, is a one-party state that has never had a woman president or premier. The all-powerful Politburo Standing Committee, which currently has seven members, has never had any women either. China is not a feminist paradise. Indeed, it was ranked 103 out of 149 countries for gender parity in a 2018 report by the World Economic Forum, falling from 57th place in 2008. And
The surprising place some Korean women are going for a career boost
9 charts that put China’s transformation in perspective
This week, the People's Republic of China marked its 70th birthday with a grand parade in Beijing.  Over the past seven decades, the country has evolved from a battle-scarred backwater to a rising potential superpower. Last year, China contributed one-fifth to the global economy, as measured by purchasing power parity. It has come a long way.   Check out the following nine graphs to get a sense of the monumental changes that have taken place in the country:  GDP per capita In 2010, China overtook Japan to become the world’s second-largest economy. But GDP per capita remains below the global average and only one-fifth that of other advanced economies.  Trade China is currently the world’s to
9 charts that put China’s transformation in perspective
Xi Jinping’s Chinese dream, and the nightmare of a ‘triple threat’
The gigantic bazaar in Baigou, Hebei province has 216 escalators. There, shoppers can browse more than 10,000 stores and, for the cost of a movie ticket, buy a handbag that looks like a Louis Vuitton or Gucci original. The bazaar, officially known as the Hedao International Trade Center for Cases and Bags, symbolizes the northern Chinese town’s dream of finding a place in the global trading landscape. Around two hours south of Beijing, Baigou’s effort to put itself on the map has come a long way. According to the town’s local history archive, the collective commune system in rural China imposed in the 1950s wiped out traditional trading, resulting in famine and catastrophe. The daily grain r
Xi Jinping’s Chinese dream, and the nightmare of a ‘triple threat’
Officials faked economic data and tried covering their tracks
Officials in a central Chinese city have been found to have gone to extraordinary lengths to fake economic data and try to cover their tracks. The National Bureau of Statistics said that the city, Guanghan, told census staff to create a system that required towns and industrial estates to provide data “matched” to a predetermined target for overall gross domestic product. Bad data obscures the real picture of the health of the economy and could mislead policymakers and investors alike, sometimes to disastrous effect. Guanghan (population 600,000) is no big town, but it provides a useful case study of why and how economic numbers could be fudged in China. In 2018, Guanghan reported that its e
Officials faked economic data and tried covering their tracks
Someone is winning the trade war, and it’s not the US (or China)
Vietnam has gained most from the shift in supply chains triggered by a nearly year-long trade war between China and the United States, according to a report by Japanese investment bank Nomura. The bank studied trade data for the world’s 50 biggest economies, spanning from the first quarter of 2018 to the first three months of 2019, to gauge the extent of trade diversions – the redirection of goods to avoid paying duties. Trade diversions by importers from the US and China have resulted in a boost to Vietnam’s economy of almost 8%. The majority of Vietnam’s gains came from additional imports of goods covered by US tariffs on China, mainly electronic apparatus for telephones, furniture, and au
Someone is winning the trade war, and it’s not the US (or China)