China education

China education

Parents in China feel like tutors. They are fed up
In China, a regional education department was forced to issue a directive warning teachers that they are responsible for checking students’ homework after widespread complaints from parents.  There have been grumblings from parents in China that they are tasked with doing more and more of the teachers’ work after school, such as correcting homework or reading dictation exercises for their kids.  Liaoning’s education department said teachers who ask parents or students to correct homework risk losing the qualifications necessary for promotion or awards competitions. The order followed similar instructions from other local governments in places like Shandong and Shanxi provinces. Parents acro
China Trends: remnants of a sacked palace, and athletics become part of entrance exams
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. A reminder of past humiliation Every Chinese schoolchild knows the story of the Old Summer Palace. The palace was built throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries and featured a beautiful staircase leading into the main entrance overlooking a lavish garden. Located on Beijing’s outskirts, it was the perfect retreat for Chinese emperors looking for a respite from the bustling capital. In 1860 it was burned to the ground and looted by French and British troops during the Second Opium War. It has become a source of nati
China Trends: WeChat blocks Indian users and a student quits a top college to change major
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. WeChat complies to India’s ban WeChat, China’s messaging super-app owned by Tencent, officially restricted users in India from using the app on Saturday, as a result of India’s ban on WeChat and 58 other Chinese apps in June.  The Indian government banned 59 Chinese apps in late June, including TikTok, WeChat and Baidu maps, saying they threatened India’s “sovereignty and integrity” two weeks after a fatal clash between Chinese and Indian troops at a Himalayan border.  The news prompted concerns on Chinese social media
China Trends: A teacher fired for flower envy and movie theaters reopen
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. A teacher lost her job over a bouquet of flowers A student at a Chinese primary school gave her head teacher a bouquet of flowers as a token of gratitude, but the well-meaning gesture soon devolved into the public firing of one teacher and three school administrators.  A teacher, surnamed Wang, became visibly angry after the head teacher received the flowers. Perhaps feeling underappreciated, Wang went on a tirade. She started shouting at the student, accusing the parents of disrespecting her and would eventually throw
China Trends: a ban on imported garbage and an air conditioning controversy
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. No more imported waste The Chinese government said it would try to eliminate all garbage imports by the end of 2020, a decision that would mean 2.74 million tons of solid waste would need to find a new home.  In early-2018, China announced it would stop importing certain grades of solid waste that is typically recycled. The government announcement on June 2 would extend that ban to practically all forms of garbage from abroad. The US, Australia and the European Union are among the top regions that export their waste to
China's toughest test just got harder
Last Tuesday was the most anticipated opening day of a new term for Yin Shirui, a high school student in Ganzhou, in the eastern Chinese province of Jiangxi. It came about two months later than usual because of the coronavirus pandemic. For final-year high school students in nine Chinese provinces, last week marked their return to campus after an extended winter holiday and weeks of online learning at home. “I don’t like learning on the internet at all. I stayed at home alone for most of the day, from morning until late in the afternoon,” Yin, 17, said. “I am not interested in what is taught in online class because the teachers there do not target me, or my class. They target the whole grad
What happens when schooling goes online: China’s experience 
The number of children not attending school has soared as governments seek to contain the coronavirus pandemic by keeping down crowds. Unesco estimates that 1.2 billion students – nearly three-quarters of the world’s student population – are being affected by national or local closures, school postponements or schools that continue under special circumstances. A large portion of those affected students live in China, where the Covid-19 disease caused by the virus was first reported.  When the general public became aware of the outbreak in January, schools in China were on winter break. As the crisis grew, China began to implement extreme measures to fight the coronavirus and have closed most
Former Chinese university official fired after #MeToo allegation
Despite arrests and censorship campaigns, China’s #MeToo movement has succeeded in shedding light on problems of sexual harassment in the country, particularly in universities.  In once such recent case, a former vice-president of a top Chinese university was fired over allegations of sexual harassment after a six-month-long investigation.  Cai Xiang also faces charges of corruption and has been stripped of his Communist Party membership.  China’s education disciplinary commission and the party’s disciplinary watchdog for Beijing municipality found that Cai Xiang had maintained “inappropriate sexual relationships with several women, accepted bribes and misused public funds.” In July 2018, a
Nope, China isn’t celebrating its big win in test scores. Here’s why
Chinese teenagers ranked as the world’s best students according to results from a closely watched global survey announced on Tuesday. But unlike in the rest of the world, in China, the victory was met with a resounding shrug. The Programme for International Student Assessment is a standardized test for 15-year-old students around the world in reading, math and science. It’s administered every three years, with 79 countries participating. The Pisa, as the test is widely known, is regarded as one of the most important ways to directly compare different educational systems. China beat out education powerhouse Singapore and its results far outstripped the West.  However, for some Chinese educat
24,000 government jobs up for grabs in China. 1.4 million people applied
Imagine taking a job test with only a 1-in-60 chance of landing the gig.  That is the reality for the Chinese public service exam, or guokao in Mandarin. More than 1.4 million people took the test on Sunday in the hopes of landing one of 24,000 available government jobs. The hotly contested annual event advertised positions from 86 central government agencies and 23 institutions directly attached to them. Successful candidates would start their positions early next year, China News reported. This year’s 1.44 million registered test-takers represented a 4% increase from last year, but fell below the 1.66 million who took the exam in 2017, the report said. The guokao has long been a big draw