China’s film industry

China’s film industry

A few pixels on a Chinese map sank ‘Abominable’ in Vietnam
An animated family film about a fluffy white yeti has been caught up in an international territorial dispute. The movie, Abominable, has been reportedly pulled from cinemas in Vietnam because of a brief scene featuring a map showing China’s disputed claims in the vast and resource-rich South China Sea.  The map offended the Vietnamese government for including the so-called “nine-dash line,” which is used by Beijing to illustrate its claims in the contested waters, Reuters reported on Monday.  Abominable, a co-production between DreamWorks Animation and Shanghai-based Pearl Studio, depicts how a Chinese girl and her friends help a yeti return to its home on Mount Everest.  The controversial
A few pixels on a Chinese map sank ‘Abominable’ in Vietnam
Chinese filmmaker defies state boycott of Taiwan’s Oscars
A mainland Chinese director has vowed to ignore a national boycott and keep her documentary in the running for Taiwan’s Golden Horse Awards, the Oscars of the Chinese-speaking world.  The film, whose title loosely translates as Young People Question Taoism, was directed by filmmaker Zhu Yu. It is the only mainland Chinese production still registered for the festival, which is held every year in self-ruled Taiwan.  The documentary follows four young Taoist priests on a 370-mile pilgrimage through China as they seek the true meaning of their faith. They stop along the way to pray for the souls of dead animals. The Chinese government this month banned mainland Chinese films and stars from parti
Chinese filmmaker defies state boycott of Taiwan’s Oscars
Get to know rising Chinese leading man Li Xian
China’s top-rated TV series of the summer has made a leading man out of chiseled actor Li Xian. The 27-year-old starred as professional video gamer Han Shangyan in the 41-part smash hit romantic drama Go Go Squid! opposite established actress Yang Zi. The title of the show refers to the online handle of Yang’s character, a social media influencer. Li has been the talk of the town this summer. Since airing in July, the series has been streamed more than 9.6 billion times, making it China’s most-watched TV program last month. For proof of his newfound stardom, look no further than the party held at The Peninsula Beijing hotel by Chinese streaming giant iQiyi to get a sense of Li’s popularity.
Get to know rising Chinese leading man Li Xian
A-list Chinese actresses plead for more roles for older women
A group of prominent Chinese actresses have made a dramatic plea at an award ceremony on Sunday to filmmakers: cast more women in their 30s and beyond. “Dear directors, we are older but we are wiser,” the 41-year-old actress Hai Qing said on stage as two other renowned film stars stood next to her. “But to be honest,” she said, “the market, subject matter and other factors have barred us from working on quality films.” Hai’s plea to an industry that critics say prizes the appeal of youth over acting chops has resonated with many people on the Chinese internet.         View this post on Instagram                   #haiqing A post shared by 海清 (@haiqingofficial) on Apr 29, 20
A-list Chinese actresses plead for more roles for older women
The Bond girl that China barely knows
Decades before superstars such as Gong Li and Zhang Ziyi made their first forays into Hollywood, Chinese actress Tsai Chin played a Bond girl in the 007 spy film You Only Live Twice (1967). To shoot the scenes where her Chinese double agent character traps the debonair British spy in an assassination attempt, Tsai, also known as Irene Chow, was in bed with Sean Connery for three days. Before that, Tsai had been the first Chinese star to perform in London’s West End, earning rave reviews in the star role of Suzie in The World of Suzie Wong in the late 1950s. Yet Tsai is far from being a household name in China, where audiences pay scant attention to her roles in American film and television p
The Bond girl that China barely knows
Disney got Mulan’s house wrong, say Chinese fans
Chinese fans are questioning the authenticity of Disney’s depiction of the iconic heroine Mulan, after viewing a new trailer for the highly anticipated live-action film. In the trailer, the titular character is seen riding her horse across emerald-green rice paddies and arriving at home – a distinctive donut-shaped structure with mud walls, tiled roofs and a bustling courtyard shared with neighbors. This scene has Chinese fans scratching their heads. The real Mulan, if she lived at all, could not have lived in such a house. “This is American-style ancient China,” said one internet user on the Twitter-like Weibo.  The unique, instantly identifiable home seen in the trailer is called a tulou,
Disney got Mulan’s house wrong, say Chinese fans
Chinese filmgoers unhappy with Disney’s Ariel casting
Chinese fans may love NBA players and African-American entertainers, but they’re upset with Disney’s decision to cast Halle Bailey to play Ariel in the live-action movie adaption of The Little Mermaid. Disney announced the casting of 19-year-old Bailey, who is black, this week. While the casting was largely praised on Western social media, it triggered a wave of disappointment and anger on the Chinese internet.  “I don’t discriminate against black people, but the Little Mermaid is just not black in my memory,” said one of the most liked comments on the Twitter-like Weibo. “Is this mermaid from the Somali Sea?” another Weibo user said. “Don’t ruin my childhood, you big-head fish!” Internet u
Chinese filmgoers unhappy with Disney’s Ariel casting
China finally gets to see Spirited Away, and loves it
Animation maestro Hayao Miyazaki’s 2001 film Spirited Away had a record opening weekend for a Japanese film in China, and has taken more than twice as much as another big animated film, Pixar’s Toy Story 4, which hit cinemas the same day. As of the afternoon of June 25, Spirited Away had box office takings of more than $33 million in China, compared with less than $16 million for Toy Story 4. Spirited Away took more than $18 million from Friday to Sunday, performing even better than the first Miyazaki film to enjoy a wide cinematic release in China, My Neighbor Totoro, which opened in December last year. Miyazaki’s whimsical films have enchanted audiences worldwide for decades, but they had
China finally gets to see Spirited Away, and loves it
Why Daniel Wu moved to Asia to become a star
Daniel Wu took an unconventional path to become a film star: he was born in the United States but moved to Hong Kong to make it big. He has now starred in over 60 films, including Warcraft and Tomb Raider. Wu recently spoke about his first break in Hong Kong, and how that success made him hungrier for global roles. Watch the video.
Why Daniel Wu moved to Asia to become a star
The uncredited producer of the first Oscar-winning documentary feature
As a fourth-generation Chinese-American who grew up in Hawaii, Robin Lung had always had many Asian role models around her. But as a filmmaker, writer and director, she had always felt they didn’t have enough representation in books, films and on television. In her search for a strong Chinese female character, Lung stumbled upon the late Gladys Li Ling-ai, a second-generation Chinese woman born in the early 20th century who, like her, was a Hawaiian. One thing stood out about Li. In her memoir Life is for a Long Time, she mentions that she produced a documentary called Kukan – “heroic courage under bitter suffering” – a color film shot in China in the 1930s during the second Sino-Japanese w
The uncredited producer of the first Oscar-winning documentary feature