China’s internet censorship

China’s internet censorship

By controlling what people can and cannot see, China has turned the internet into a tool of government.

Whistle-blower’s death sets off a torrent of anger at China’s government
The death of one of the first Chinese doctors who alerted others about the coronavirus outbreak before it killed hundreds of people, including himself, has unleashed an outpouring of anger and grief toward the government. Dr Li Wenliang, a 34-year-old ophthalmologist in Wuhan, the central city where the virus was discovered, was admonished by the police for warning others about the previously unknown coronavirus in a chat group before officials disclosed it to the public. Li’s death, from pneumonia caused by the coronavirus, was first reported by Chinese media on Thursday night. The Wuhan Central Hospital, where he worked, said he died at 2.58am on Friday. Overnight, Li’s death has become th
Whistle-blower’s death sets off a torrent of anger at China’s government
He rose to fame for exposing fake kung fu. Now he just wants to ‘survive’
For professional fighters, nerves before a match come with the job. But for Xu Xiaodong, China’s most controversial mixed martial artist, successfully leaving the country on a clear, cold day in November seemed like an impossible challenge. Standing in the departure hall of Beijing’s new international airport on a planned trip to Bangkok, Xu looked calm. But beneath the barrel-chested facade, the 41-year-old was full of worry. He felt like he was taking a huge gamble. Would he be allowed to board the flight to Thailand to take part in the most important fight of his life?  Two years ago, before Xu began taking on China’s kung fu establishment, the answer would have been a resounding yes. But
He rose to fame for exposing fake kung fu. Now he just wants to ‘survive’
Tracking the cat and mouse game of social media censorship in China
July 21, 2019 remains seared into Hongkongers’ memories for the shocking images and videos of white-shirted men, some suspected to be gangsters, beating protesters and train passengers with sticks in the Yuen Long railway station. Over the border in mainland China, the date evokes a memory of a different scenario: black-clad protesters converging on Beijing’s liaison office in Hong Kong and defacing the national emblem of the People’s Republic of China. Until that day, Chinese media had been silent on protests erupting in Hong Kong. The protests were sparked by a now withdrawn extradition bill that would have allowed criminal suspects to be sent for trial on the mainland, among other jurisdi
Tracking the cat and mouse game of social media censorship in China
The year the Chinese propaganda machine failed spectacularly
If President Xi Jinping’s team carries out annual job appraisals, China’s overseas propaganda team will surely be found to have performed catastrophically.  Whether it is Hong Kong or Xinjiang, Huawei or the trade war with the United States, the Chinese regime has had a string of notable public relations failures this year. While the regime’s propaganda efforts have worked quite well on the domestic audience, mainly because of the Great Firewall, the overseas propaganda arm has suffered major defeats.  Despite deploying numerous resources via official and unofficial channels, the regime has not only failed to achieve its intended purpose of interacting well with the rest of the world but als
The year the Chinese propaganda machine failed spectacularly
US teenager lashes out at China’s Muslim detention camps on TikTok
A TikTok video showing a teenager bringing attention to China’s mass detentions of Muslim minorities while curling her eyelashes has gone viral on the Chinese-owned social platform.  “Hi guys. I’m going to teach you guys how to get long lashes,” the creator, who describes herself as a teenage Muslim girl in the US, said in the clip that resembles a beauty tip video.  “The first thing you need to do is to grab your lash curler, curl your lashes obviously, and you are going to put them down, and use your phone that you are using right now, to search about what’s happening in China, how they are getting concentration camps throwing innocent Muslims in there.” i always wondered how girls get the
US teenager lashes out at China’s Muslim detention camps on TikTok
US to boost soft power with Mandarin network
The US government is planning a major new Mandarin-language initiative in an effort to bolster its global reputation at a time of Chinese ascendancy and eroding American soft power. Voice of America (VOA) and Radio Free Asia (RFA) are joining forces on a new network called Global Mandarin, according to internal memos, job placement advertisements and interviews with people close to Washington’s information arms. Its annual budget would be between $5 million and $10 million, potentially rising in the second year, according to a source who requested anonymity given links to the networks. It would focus on softer content aimed at reaching younger Chinese in the US, China and beyond. The US roll
US to boost soft power with Mandarin network
What happens when Chinese ex-journalist brings up Hong Kong’s protests
Having worked for a newspaper in mainland China, Fang Kecheng is no stranger to how Beijing maintains its grip on news and information. Still, the former journalist was perturbed by the online abuse he received after broaching Hong Kong politics.  Seizing on his posts on Facebook and Weibo, Fang’s detractors have accused him of betraying China after he shared stories about the unrest in Hong Kong.  Fang said he has been bombarded with thousands of abusive messages. He quoted one as saying: “Have you not burned to death yet?” The barrage of angry messages highlights the pressure mainland Chinese commentators face to toe the official line when speaking about sensitive topics including the Hong
What happens when Chinese ex-journalist brings up Hong Kong’s protests
The ‘widespread misconception’ fueling mainland Chinese anger at Hong Kong
When a police officer fired bullets at masked protesters in Hong Kong on Monday morning, the scene went viral online across the city and mainland China. What happened was not in dispute, but their perceptions were wildly different. While Hongkongers were outraged and questioned the officer’s use of live ammunition, viewers in the mainland put the blame squarely on the protesters, including the 21-year-old student who was shot. “The police officer was firing to save his life from the cockroach. He did nothing wrong,” said a top comment on the Weibo social media site popular among mainland Chinese users. The divergence highlights the wide divide in public opinion between mainland China and the
The ‘widespread misconception’ fueling mainland Chinese anger at Hong Kong
Mainland Chinese who oppose Hong Kong protests aren’t brainwashed
“You have been brainwashed since young.” This is the most frequently heard accusation against someone born and raised in mainland China. Of late, especially, it is targeted at those who oppose the protests in Hong Kong that had been triggered by a now-withdrawn extradition bill.  People in Hong Kong, Taiwan, the United States and elsewhere who support the months-long anti-government protests are outraged that many mainland Chinese take issue with the protests. They believe China’s “Great Firewall” – its system of online censorship – effectively filters every piece of information deemed detrimental to the ruling regime, thus depriving mainland Chinese of any ability to form a “correct” judgme
Mainland Chinese who oppose Hong Kong protests aren’t brainwashed
From the NBA to Winnie the Pooh, China isn’t acting like a confident nation
The attack on Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey’s tweet (“Fight for freedom. Stand with Hong Kong”) put China’s vision for a new world order in stark relief for an American audience, showing the lengths to which China will go in its campaign to squelch free speech. Xi Jinping’s administration is doing to foreign businesses what it has long done to domestic dissenters: punishing those whose words stray outside ever-narrower red lines. Airlines have had to redraw maps. T-shirt slogans that seem to suggest Taipei and Hong Kong are on a par with Beijing have been withdrawn. A pro-democracy shoe designer saw the shoes he had designed for Nike taken off the shelf. A BNP lawyer in Hong Ko
From the NBA to Winnie the Pooh, China isn’t acting like a confident nation