China's military weapons

China's military weapons

China and India blame each other for first deadly clash in decades
China’s foreign minister on Wednesday accused Indian troops of provoking the border clashes on Monday that left at least 20 people dead, saying Beijing was determined to maintain its territorial integrity. In the highest level communication since the deadliest conflict in the region for more than four decades, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told his Indian counterpart Subrahmanyam Jaishankar over the phone that the two sides should resolve their tensions through dialogue and keep the border safe, the Chinese foreign ministry quoted him as saying. The call was the latest move to de-escalate tensions after at least 20 Indian soldiers were killed in the clash in the Galwan River alley. China
China unsure if it should unveil its new stealth bomber this year
China’s new generation strategic bomber is likely to be ready for delivery this year, but Beijing is said to be undecided about unveiling it at a complex time in regional relations due to the coronavirus pandemic. Military sources said the Xian H-20 subsonic stealth bomber – expected to double the country’s strike range – could make its first public appearance at China’s largest air show, in the southern city of Zhuhai in November, if the pandemic is sufficiently under control. “The Zhuhai Airshow is expected to become a platform to promote China’s image and its success in pandemic control – telling the outside world that the contagion did not have any big impacts on Chinese defense enterpri
US needs more guns and friends to counter China, Pentagon official says
The United States must prepare for a possible military conflict with China, including by developing new weapons and strengthening ties with allies, a senior Trump administration official said on Thursday. In remarks that underscored growing competition between the US government and an increasingly powerful Chinese military, Chad Sbragia, deputy assistant secretary of defense for China, said the Pentagon needs to “build and deploy a more lethal, resilient joint force.”  That includes more hypersonic weapons, artificial intelligence, robots and laser weapons, Sbragia told the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, which was set up by Congress in 2000 to evaluate the defense implicat
China’s show of military might risks backfiring
China’s military parade on October 1 – one of the largest in human history – to observe the 70th anniversary of the communist republic’s founding was largely aimed at a domestic audience. But the bigger impact of the massive display of Chinese military hardware was on the world stage, particularly on its neighbors and the US-led West, whether it was intended or not. Beijing proclaimed that the parade was showing a “peace-loving and responsible China.” Nevertheless, the widely asked question is what was the motivation behind such a massive show of Chinese military might – which included more than 160 aircraft and 580 active weapon systems, among them new fighter jets, bombers and tanks. The
China shows off naval power with anniversary parade
China staged a huge naval parade on Tuesday to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese navy.  The leadership under Xi Jinping has embarked on a major military modernization campaign to boost the combat capability of Chinese troops. And the country's expanding naval power has unnerved neighboring governments that are engaged in territorial disputes with Beijing.  The parade, held in thick fog in the eastern port of Qingdao, featured new warships, nuclear submarines and the country’s first aircraft carrier.  Check out the gallery, above, to see the latest show of China’s power at sea. 
China channels its inner Top Gun in new propaganda video
The Chinese military just released a video to hype up its upcoming air show in Changchun, northeast China. The video will be screening it to new cadets, while some of the jets featured perform stunts overhead. The footage showcases China’s newest stealth fighter, the J-20, a jet which is meant to compete against the United States’ F-22 Raptor stealth warplane.
This is what it looks like when doves spy
If you’ve ever looked up to the sky and marveled at the graceful sweep of bird gliding above, be warned: it could be a Chinese drone monitoring your every move. The idea might seem far-fetched, but robotic birds are very much a reality, and China has been using them to surveil people across the country. Sources told the South China Morning Post that more than 30 military and government agencies have deployed the birdlike drones and related devices in at least five provinces in recent years. The “spy bird” program, code-named “Dove”, is being led by Song Bifeng, a professor at Northwestern Polytechnical University in Xian, capital of northwestern China’s Shaanxi province. Yang Wenqing, an as