China’s population policy

China’s population policy

China has abandoned its notorious one-child policy, but it hasn’t been enough to boost falling birth rates.

How a 3am call and a secret inspire film remembering China’s abandoned children
One Sunday afternoon in February 2017, Chinese film director Yuchao Feng was in his flat in the US state of New Jersey when he received a phone call from his mother that would shock and inspire him. Feng knew something was wrong – not just because it was 3am in the northern Chinese city of Tianjin, where his mother, Wang Jingjing, was calling from, but because they rarely spoke. “My parents were not around much when I was growing up in Ningde,” says Feng, recalling the city of three million in Fujian province, in the country’s southeast, known for its tea cultivation. “And we talked even less after I moved to the US to study film in 2011.” Feng’s mother was having a nightmare similar to thos
How a 3am call and a secret inspire film remembering China’s abandoned children
China should ease pain from one-child policy repercussions
In 1992, I was abandoned as a baby and found in a public place in Hefei, China. For almost two years, I lived in an orphanage and with a foster mother. Then my adoptive mother flew me to Sacramento, California, where I grew up. My existence here in the United States is due to China’s infamous one-child policy, which was imposed for more than three decades before it was eased to a two-child policy in 2015.  I am one of more than 90,000 children adopted from China and raised in the US between 1992 and 2018.  About 40,000 other children went to families in the Netherlands, Spain and Britain. In her devastating poem, One Art, Elizabeth Bishop writes of loss in a way I relate to. She describes mi
China should ease pain from one-child policy repercussions
Chinese woman gave birth at 67 to her third child – and could be fined for it
China’s oldest new mother and her husband may be fined for breaking family planning rules because they already have two adult children, according to a Chinese media report. A 67-year-old retired hospital worker, surnamed Tian, gave birth to a girl named Tianci by cesarean section at the Zaozhuang Maternity and Child Health Hospital in Shandong province on October 25. Tianci’s birth made headlines around the world, and some commentators questioned her parents’ claim that she was conceived naturally. “We don’t know what people are saying online, but this really happened to us,” the news website ThePaper.cn quoted Huang Weiping, the child’s father, on Saturday as saying. “Besides being in good
Chinese woman gave birth at 67 to her third child – and could be fined for it
What wasn’t said during China’s 70th anniversary parade
Mention of China's controversial family planning policy was curiously absent from National Day celebrations in Beijing on Tuesday, sending a clear signal, according to analysts, that the country’s decades-long policy of birth restrictions could be scrapped altogether. China scrapped its one-child policy in 2016 to allow couples to have two children as its birth rate slows and its population ages. This move has so far proved unsuccessful in boosting births. Analysts said the lack of slogans or delegates related to the policy was a signal China could be about to lift restrictions entirely in a bid to encourage births. “Family planning was an achievement for the People’s Republic at its 60th an
What wasn’t said during China’s 70th anniversary parade
Young Chinese mock proposal to lower marriage age
Young Chinese aren’t buying a proposal by legislators to lower the legal minimum age for marriage in an effort to combat the country’s looming demographic crisis.  Last week, several members of the National People’s Congress, China’s rubber-stamp legislative body, proposed lowering the minimum marriage age to 18 for both sexes. Currently, the legal minimum age is 22 for men and 20 for women. Zhang Sujun, one of the body’s Standing Committee members, who proposed the change, said the proposal could encourage young couples to marry earlier and to have more babies. China’s birth rate fell in 2018 to its lowest level since 2000. Researchers have warned that the country’s population is aging rapi
Young Chinese mock proposal to lower marriage age
Why Chinese people are outraged by Alabama’s abortion ban
Alabama’s move to ban nearly all abortions in the state has shaken a country divided over women’s right to terminate a pregnancy. But in China, there is no debate. On Twitter-like Weibo, social media users have overwhelmingly slammed the American state’s sweeping abortion ban. “You cannot even have abortions if you are impregnated by rape or incest? Are these people crazy?” said a top comment. The stark contrast underscores how a history of population control policies has helped shape views on abortion in the world’s most populous nation. “In America, abortion might be a debate of human rights, and specifically, women’s rights. But in China, it’s not an issue of rights but an issue of law a
Why Chinese people are outraged by Alabama’s abortion ban
The sperm-collecting machine helping China through hard times
Unlike seeing a dentist, where you lie down helplessly and let a doctor torment you, andrology – the study of male health – is one of the rare medical disciplines that can both involve pleasure and demand effort on the patient’s part. Enter the SW-3701 Sperm Extractor, a machine that takes the tedious labor of masturbation out of the process of collecting semen, for donation and diagnosis alike. Featuring a pink receptacle that mimics a vagina, the machine promises to be a hands-free solution to hospitals in a country that needs quality male healthcare more than ever. Chinese people are having fewer children – whether by choice or not – at a time when China needs babies the most in order to
The sperm-collecting machine helping China through hard times
Inkstone index: China’s dwindling marriages
7.2 per thousand: China’s marriage rate in 2018. The Chinese marriage rate has been falling for five years in a row since 2013, hitting a new low last year, according to the country’s National Statistics Bureau and Civil Affairs Bureau. The number, which comes as China grapples with a falling birth rate and a mounting number of divorces, reflects growing anxiety among younger Chinese who are worried about salary, housing and jobs. In 2013 the marriage rate was 9.9 per thousand, and it’s fallen steadily to 7.2 per thousand to 2018, the statistics show. China’s marriage rate increased steadily from 2006 and peaked at 2013. The falling marriage rate is directly linked to a region’s income leve
Inkstone index: China’s dwindling marriages
A 12-year-old girl is caught smuggling blood for sex testing
A 12-year-old girl was caught at a customs checkpoint in southern China smuggling a backpack full of blood samples from pregnant women into Hong Kong, most likely for gender testing, officials said. Prenatal sex testing is banned in China but legal in Hong Kong, and a cross-border business has flourished since China began enforcing a “one-child” policy in the late 1970s and has persisted since the policy’s recent reversal. The girl was caught on February 23 after her heavy-looking bag raised suspicion at the border crossing between the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen and Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous Chinese city which operates under a different legal framework. “This little kid’s bag was v
A 12-year-old girl is caught smuggling blood for sex testing
An aging China will never overtake the US economy
In 2010, China replaced Japan as the world’s second-largest economy. Many economists believe it is just a matter of time before China dethrones the United States as the world’s biggest economy – some have argued that it could happen before 2030. They have cited the history of other Asian economies which surged ahead as evidence. The nominal per capita gross domestic product of China was just a sixth of America’s in 2018 – a level similar to Japan in 1960, Taiwan in 1978 and South Korea in 1986. In the following two decades, those three Asian economies achieved annual growth rates of between 7% and 8%. As such, well-respected economists have argued that China is poised to go through a similar
An aging China will never overtake the US economy