Chinese Canadians

Chinese Canadians

Chinese-Canadian Museum showcases unique cultures of migrant ancestors
At a time when the Covid-19 pandemic has fuelled anti-Asian racism and violence around the world, a new exhibition in Vancouver aims to shine a light on the accomplishments – and hardships - of its Chinese-Canadian migrants. The new exhibition - “A Seat to the Table: Chinese Immigration and British Columbia” - in Vancouver’s historic Chinatown district celebrates the achievements, bravery and determination of thousands of Chinese immigrants who have been arriving in Vancouver for more than 170 years. Starting in the mid-1800s, villagers – generally from the southern provinces - traveled by ship across the Pacific looking for work building the Canadian Pacific Railway or trying their luck min
Tycoon and daughter said they loved each other. Then they sued
Chinese tycoon Li Jianhua once planned to live next door to his daughter in Vancouver after he retired from a career that has brought him political prestige and great wealth in China. The daughter, Carol Li, proclaimed “devotion and filial piety” to her father. He declared “love and affection” for his only child. But instead of living out his days beside his daughter, widowed Li Jianhua, 65, is battling her in Canadian courts over a $14.1 million Vancouver real estate fortune. Unproven and untested accusations of fraud and violence were made. Li denies his daughter’s claims. She denies his counterclaims. The conflict, depicted in legal documents obtained by the South China Morning Post, shed