Chinese food trends

Chinese food trends

Online superstar reignites cultural clash over kimchi
Chinese internet star Li Ziqi has found herself in a right pickle after unwittingly launching a cultural clash between Korea and China - all over a video of her making what appears to be kimchi. The 19-minute video titled, ‘The Life of a White Radish,’ has prompted an online war of words between people from the two countries – who both claim to own the dish of pickled vegetables. The 30-year-old vlogger – who has a combined social media following of 58 million fans on Weibo and YouTube – posted the video on Saturday with the hashtags #ChineseCuisine and #ChineseFood. Shortly after, angry Koreans flooded the comments section, criticizing Li for stealing their culture and insulting Korean tra
China’s KFC and Pizza Hut plan drastic cut in plastics
The Chinese operator of KFC and Pizza Hut wants to start using paper straws and biodegradable packaging to cut plastic usage by almost one third over the next five years. Yum China Holdings, one of China’s largest restaurant operators, intends to phase out non-degradable plastic bags and cutlery at all its KFC restaurants in mainland China by the end of 2025 and eliminate non-degradable bags from its Pizza Hut stores by the end of 2022. The overall aim is to achieve a 30% reduction in non-degradable plastic packaging by weight via a series of initiatives. “As a result of these initiatives, Yum China expects a reduction of approximately 8,000 tons in non-degradable plastics annually starting
Move aside KFC, Chinese fried food fit for a president
During his time in office, US President Donald Trump drummed up news at such a volume that individual moments that would otherwise define any other presidency were lost in the avalanche.   One such moment was when the Clemson Tigers college football team, fresh off their national championship, was served fast food in the form of McDonald’s, Wendy’s and Burger King during their White House visit.  The photos went viral because it highlighted the government shutdown at the time, but it also seemed to have been a good decision. It was also a reminder that Donald Trump may enjoy fast food more than any other president gracing the oval office.  Trump is also famously partial to KFC, which is som
Stinky tofu and mapo tofu are wonderful. Why haven't they caught on in America?
Tofu is deeply ingrained in the culinary landscape of East Asia. Unlike in the West, it is not usually considered as a meat substitute, but rather just another great source of protein. The food has been around for centuries in Asian countries, including Japan, Korea, Indonesia and Thailand. It is an essential ingredient that can be made into stir-fry, soups, buns, noodles and desserts.  So how did tofu make its way to the United States? The first well-known American to document tofu was none other than founding father Benjamin Franklin, who wrote to a friend – and even sent him some soybeans – after reading about tofu in a book while in London in the 1760s. “Franklin read about tofu in a bo
Hairy crabs make an unusual tool for corruption in China
Hairy crabs, a popular delicacy famed for its creamy orange roe and juicy, protein-rich meat, are sought-after gifts in China during the fall season.  The crustaceans are so prized that they have in the past been used to bribe government officials. Like clockwork, the Communist Party’s corruption watchdog sounds the alarm every year and warns against potential legal troubles caused by sharing luxury crabs. Chinese authorities have published several officials during anti-graft campaigns for receiving high-valued gifts such as hairy crabs. But despite that, Chinese people still try to win favors from powerful people by sending them the crustaceans.  For example, in Hangzhou, in the eastern pr
Beijing to make laws against food waste following Xi’s call
China could be set to introduce legislation against food wastage, following President Xi Jinping’s call this week for the country to change its habits. Xi has issued a directive demanding more regulations and public education to promote frugality. He called China’s food waste problem “shocking and distressing,” and said the country needs to stay vigilant about potential food security crises. Zhang Guilong, an official with the Legislative Affairs Commission, under the National People’s Congress Standing Committee, China’s top legislative body, said the commission would formulate regulations on preventing food waste. “We would strengthen management of all aspects including grain production, p
Fins from 38,500 protected sharks found in Hong Kong’s biggest ever seizure
Customs officials in Hong Kong have made their largest ever shark fin seizure, uncovering 28.7 tons taken from 38,500 endangered sharks inside a pair of shipping containers from South America, the city’s authorities said. The two consignments, worth $1.1 million, more than doubled the combined hauls of shark fin seized in all of 2019, according to Hong Kong’s customs department. Assistant superintendent Danny Cheung Kwok-yin of the agency said both consignments were sent from the same shipper to the same Hong Kong logistics company. Customs officers have arrested the owner of the logistics firm, but the 57-year-old man has been granted bail pending further investigation. A law enforcement so
As Wuhan emerges from the shadow of coronavirus, a familiar face is missing
As traffic jams and other trappings of urban life return to the streets of Wuhan, something in the city’s old town feels off. Where is Auntie Xiong? Before the coronavirus outbreak forced the city into a monthslong lockdown that was lifted on Wednesday, Xiong could be seen every day at her breakfast stall at a bustling corner on Shenyang Road. She was there every morning, standing behind a wok of sizzling oil, dripping in sweat and frying one of Wuhan’s best-known breakfast snacks. The snack, called mianwo, is a savory, doughnut-shaped bun that pairs with Wuhan-style rice wine or hot-and-dry noodles, a famous breakfast staple in Wuhan.  Xiong, in her fifties, had been at it for more than a
The hard part of banning the consumption of wild animals? Defining them
Turtle soup, rice porridge with frog, snake soup, frog leg clay pot rice – could popular dishes in Chinese cuisine like these be off restaurant menus in China for good? That’s the worry of chefs, food critics and restaurant owners after the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, China’s top lawmaking body, banned the trade and consumption of wild animals in late February as part of measures to contain the coronavirus outbreak. The consumption of wild animals has drawn much government scrutiny, as both the current epidemic and the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) have been associated with markets in China selling meat from wild animals. The Sars virus o
Chinese city drafts ‘white list’ of 9 edible animals. Dogs are out
The southern Chinese city of Shenzhen has proposed a regulation that would prohibit the eating of cats and dogs as part of a nationwide drive to implement a “total ban” on the wildlife trade following the Covid-19 outbreak. The city has drafted a “white list” of nine farm animals deemed fit for consumption – pigs, cattle, sheep, donkeys, rabbits, chickens, ducks, geese and pigeons.  While the list is not exhaustive, the city said in a notice it was seeking to make a “stringent” law to promote “civilized eating habits.” Eaters of forbidden species would be fined between 2,000 yuan to 20,000 yuan ($280 to $2,800), according to the proposal. The animals’ breeders and sellers would be punished w