Chinese food trends

Chinese food trends

How Hong Kong’s quintessential street snack has gained a cult following
In a nondescript storefront on a busy street in Hong Kong, a long line of hungry office workers begins to form each evening.  Yue Lai Lao Zhu Snacks is home to what many believe is the world’s best siu mai, a steamed dumpling made with pork, shrimp, mushrooms and, sometimes, fish paste. The hole-in-the-wall in Tuen Mun, a suburban neighborhood in the northwestern reaches of Hong Kong, has gained a cult following in recent years, especially among food-obsessed commuters who want a quick bite on their way home.  “Siu mai is part of Hong Kong people’s lives,” says Patrick Chu, who opened the thriving dumpling business a decade ago.  Chu’s dumplings - based on his father’s recipe- are regarded
Mushroom might become the hottest health and wellness trend of 2021
Mushrooms are finally having their moment.  Long regarded in China for their medicinal benefits, mushrooms – including reishi, lion’s mane and chaga - have become one of the hottest health and wellness trends in North America.  “We’re living in increasingly stressful times and studies have established a direct connection between mental and physical health,” said Ben Stocker, Hong Kong’s leading retailer for mushroom powder.  “Mushrooms are at the forefront of this trend” as they help to fight stress and aging while providing energy and a better night’s sleep, he said. Among its biggest proponents in the US is wellness guru Gwyneth Paltrow who says she adds mushroom powder to her morning smo
Cooking tips from a Chinese stir-fry guru
Grace Young, a chef and award-winning author, grew up idolizing legendary French chef Julia Child, but it’s her love of Chinese cooking that has helped catapult her to fame across Asia and the US. She is on a mission is to demystify Chinese cooking and to take the art of stir-frying to the masses.  “The power and wisdom of Chinese cooking go far beyond simply mastering the more complex cooking techniques or even knowing the ingredients,” said Young, who grew up in San Francisco.  “For me, the principles that govern Chinese cooking and nutrition are far more intriguing than the Western notions of nutrition, with its focus on cholesterol, vitamins, minerals, fiber, carbohydrates, proteins, and
Online superstar reignites cultural clash over kimchi
Chinese internet star Li Ziqi has found herself in a right pickle after unwittingly launching a cultural clash between Korea and China - all over a video of her making what appears to be kimchi. The 19-minute video titled, ‘The Life of a White Radish,’ has prompted an online war of words between people from the two countries – who both claim to own the dish of pickled vegetables. The 30-year-old vlogger – who has a combined social media following of 58 million fans on Weibo and YouTube – posted the video on Saturday with the hashtags #ChineseCuisine and #ChineseFood. Shortly after, angry Koreans flooded the comments section, criticizing Li for stealing their culture and insulting Korean tra
China’s KFC and Pizza Hut plan drastic cut in plastics
The Chinese operator of KFC and Pizza Hut wants to start using paper straws and biodegradable packaging to cut plastic usage by almost one third over the next five years. Yum China Holdings, one of China’s largest restaurant operators, intends to phase out non-degradable plastic bags and cutlery at all its KFC restaurants in mainland China by the end of 2025 and eliminate non-degradable bags from its Pizza Hut stores by the end of 2022. The overall aim is to achieve a 30% reduction in non-degradable plastic packaging by weight via a series of initiatives. “As a result of these initiatives, Yum China expects a reduction of approximately 8,000 tons in non-degradable plastics annually starting
Move aside KFC, Chinese fried food fit for a president
During his time in office, US President Donald Trump drummed up news at such a volume that individual moments that would otherwise define any other presidency were lost in the avalanche.   One such moment was when the Clemson Tigers college football team, fresh off their national championship, was served fast food in the form of McDonald’s, Wendy’s and Burger King during their White House visit.  The photos went viral because it highlighted the government shutdown at the time, but it also seemed to have been a good decision. It was also a reminder that Donald Trump may enjoy fast food more than any other president gracing the oval office.  Trump is also famously partial to KFC, which is som
Stinky tofu and mapo tofu are wonderful. Why haven't they caught on in America?
Tofu is deeply ingrained in the culinary landscape of East Asia. Unlike in the West, it is not usually considered as a meat substitute, but rather just another great source of protein. The food has been around for centuries in Asian countries, including Japan, Korea, Indonesia and Thailand. It is an essential ingredient that can be made into stir-fry, soups, buns, noodles and desserts.  So how did tofu make its way to the United States? The first well-known American to document tofu was none other than founding father Benjamin Franklin, who wrote to a friend – and even sent him some soybeans – after reading about tofu in a book while in London in the 1760s. “Franklin read about tofu in a bo
Hairy crabs make an unusual tool for corruption in China
Hairy crabs, a popular delicacy famed for its creamy orange roe and juicy, protein-rich meat, are sought-after gifts in China during the fall season.  The crustaceans are so prized that they have in the past been used to bribe government officials. Like clockwork, the Communist Party’s corruption watchdog sounds the alarm every year and warns against potential legal troubles caused by sharing luxury crabs. Chinese authorities have published several officials during anti-graft campaigns for receiving high-valued gifts such as hairy crabs. But despite that, Chinese people still try to win favors from powerful people by sending them the crustaceans.  For example, in Hangzhou, in the eastern pr
Beijing to make laws against food waste following Xi’s call
China could be set to introduce legislation against food wastage, following President Xi Jinping’s call this week for the country to change its habits. Xi has issued a directive demanding more regulations and public education to promote frugality. He called China’s food waste problem “shocking and distressing,” and said the country needs to stay vigilant about potential food security crises. Zhang Guilong, an official with the Legislative Affairs Commission, under the National People’s Congress Standing Committee, China’s top legislative body, said the commission would formulate regulations on preventing food waste. “We would strengthen management of all aspects including grain production, p