Chinese immigrants

Chinese immigrants

Chinese-Canadian Museum showcases unique cultures of migrant ancestors
At a time when the Covid-19 pandemic has fuelled anti-Asian racism and violence around the world, a new exhibition in Vancouver aims to shine a light on the accomplishments – and hardships - of its Chinese-Canadian migrants. The new exhibition - “A Seat to the Table: Chinese Immigration and British Columbia” - in Vancouver’s historic Chinatown district celebrates the achievements, bravery and determination of thousands of Chinese immigrants who have been arriving in Vancouver for more than 170 years. Starting in the mid-1800s, villagers – generally from the southern provinces - traveled by ship across the Pacific looking for work building the Canadian Pacific Railway or trying their luck min
China’s rich nervous to move assets overseas amid pandemic crisis
For years, China’s wealthiest have strived to gain residency overseas in order to protect their assets, but the pandemic has complicated matters.  Many are now facing a million-dollar question, do they stay in China and risk losing their assets, or move abroad where they risk contracting the virus? According to consultants and business people, many are conflicted and feel pressured that the Chinese government could seize their assets in what is perceived as a campaign against business owners. Among them is Wendy Zhao and her husband, who own properties worth more than US$3 million in Shenzhen, China’s hi-tech hub.  They are at odds over whether to move to New Zealand next year to start a ne
How Hong Kong Canadians became people with two homes
Cherie Wong was utterly consumed by the protest movement that swept Hong Kong last summer. “I didn’t sleep properly for days, for weeks, really,” she said. She watched the protests obsessively, then became an activist herself. Wong, 24, tried to discuss her beliefs with older family members who included former members of the Hong Kong Police Force. “It ended up in conflict, it was awkward,” she said. But her activities were cheered by her grandmother, in her mid-80s, who was “incredibly pro-protester. We’d just go into a private chat to talk about it.” But Wong, a freelance writer and policy researcher, was not in Hong Kong. She was more than 7,450 miles away in Ottawa, Canada, watching even