Chinese international students

Chinese international students

My American dream, deferred
On my 109th day of waiting for a short-term training visa in the US, I find myself sitting in the cramped office of my local New York congresswoman, staring at a framed picture of Barack Obama on her bookshelf. I sigh. It is now the third year since Donald Trump replaced Obama in the White House.  A lot has changed, especially in immigration policy. Which is why, as a 27-year-old graduate of Columbia Journalism School, I’m visiting my congresswoman. Getting an Optional Practical Training visa, a temporary employment visa that would allow me to work for up to a year in a field related to my study, shouldn’t have been hard. Every international student who’s enrolled in a full-time program used
My American dream, deferred
Why the doors to America are closing for Chinese tech students
For many international students in US colleges, landing a job in the country could make their careers. But for millions of Chinese students graduating with degrees in technology, the nerve-wracking process of getting an American work visa has been complicated by heightened tensions between the United States and China. Chinese tech students in US colleges, especially those majoring in robotics, aviation, engineering and hi-tech manufacturing, say they have become collateral damage as Washington has increasingly painted Chinese nationals as potential threats. FBI Director Christopher Wray on Friday accused China of trying to “steal its way up the economic ladder,” naming “graduate students and
Why the doors to America are closing for Chinese tech students
US colleges must stop admitting subpar Chinese students for the money
The bombshell revelations about a scheme by which wealthy parents in the US allegedly conspired to fraudulently get their children accepted into elite universities have opened the door to wider criticism of the injustices in university admissions. These include the ongoing debates about affirmative action, accusations of racism, and legacy admissions, among others. Yet this most recent scandal overshadowed another case that made headlines this month and which sheds light on another issue plaguing campuses: accusations of academic dishonesty among Chinese students in the US. When I enrolled in the University of Maryland’s agriculture program in 1950, I was one of just four Chinese undergradu
US colleges must stop admitting subpar Chinese students for the money
Why pay bribes to US colleges when you can legally cheat your way in?
When I was in high school in New Zealand, I decided that I wanted to go to university in the United States. I contacted members of the Ivy League and a few other colleges and asked them to send me their application forms. This was in 1999, when you couldn’t do everything online yet. Then I signed up to take the SAT and ordered such prep books as I could find on Amazon. My parents had a spare room next to our garage that smelled of exhaust fumes every time they parked. My high school teachers were happy to write letters of recommendation for me, but I doubted that any of them had ever written one to Harvard or Yale or MIT In there, for the next couple of months, I spent my nights and weekends
Why pay bribes to US colleges when you can legally cheat your way in?
Back at home, China’s ‘sea turtle’ grads find the job market has moved on
As the clock struck 11pm on a Wednesday night in late January, Peter Chen finally left his office in northwest Beijing. He had been researching the tech used in self-driving cars since 10am that morning. Chen, a native of Yunnan province, is a recent returnee to China, having studied for bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science in Hong Kong. But since returning to China, Chen’s career path has been a winding one. A start-up venture he launched – a travel planning app – never got off the ground, so he spent a year teaching himself the engineering of autonomous vehicles, before landing a job at one of China’s internet giants. That has not been an easy road either. Chen works long h
Back at home, China’s ‘sea turtle’ grads find the job market has moved on
Stay or go? Chinese students in the US are running out of options
Caught in a geopolitical tug of war between China and the US, many Chinese students at American universities are wrestling with a dilemma: should they stay, or go? Several of these students – who declined to be named for fear of repercussions – said in interviews with the South China Morning Post they felt anxious about what they perceived as an increasingly hostile climate towards Chinese students in the US. Trump’s toughened China policies could slow the influx of Chinese students into US schools. This could reshape American society. Immigrants – of Chinese origin or otherwise – have been the backbone of the US economy, staffing everything from laundromats to advanced technological sectors
Stay or go? Chinese students in the US are running out of options