The People’s Liberation Army is the world’s largest military, and it’s modernizing rapidly.

The US-China rivalry will lead to an epic arms race
The defining character of the relationship between China and the United States has, for decades, been based on a gradual transition of power. Beijing recognized this early on, but a lot of powerful people in Washington did not realize what was happening until relatively recently. They had believed that the bilateral relationship was primarily about commerce. Now that it is apparent what the relationship really is about – the slow devolution of power from Washington towards Beijing – it is having a profound impact on how the two nations interact and compete. As China continues to grow stronger, it will become increasingly less inclined to compromise on issues it views as important to Chinese
The US-China rivalry will lead to an epic arms race
China’s new supersonic arsenal could give bomber force greater reach
China’s new H-6N strategic bomber could reach a maximum strike range of 6,000km (3,728 miles), military sources said. The H-6 – which is based on the Russian cold war era Tupolev 16 (known to Nato as the Badger) that went into service in 1954 – has been the mainstay of China’s bomber force since the 1970s. The H-6K have played a key role in Beijing’s “island encirclement” drills over the self-ruled Taiwan since early 2018. The military exercises were designed by Beijing to send a warning to the island’s independence-leaning government. The latest variant of the plane was designed to carry CJ-100 supersonic cruise missiles or the WZ-8 supersonic stealth spy drone, which were seen by the publi
China’s new supersonic arsenal could give bomber force greater reach
What China’s soldiers eat in the field
Like most armies around the world, the Chinese military has its own brand of ready-to-eat meals, designed to be eaten out in the field.  It’s a challenge to cater to the different tastes in the world’s biggest armed force. Chinese soldiers have in the past complained about the plain flavors of their rations.  Despite that, rations made for the People’s Liberation Army have become popular among the country’s military enthusiasts. PLA meal packs can be easily found on online shopping sites.  We taste-tested two sets of ready-to-eat meals designed for Chinese soldiers. Watch the video to find out more. 
What China’s soldiers eat in the field
China’s show of military might risks backfiring
China’s military parade on October 1 – one of the largest in human history – to observe the 70th anniversary of the communist republic’s founding was largely aimed at a domestic audience. But the bigger impact of the massive display of Chinese military hardware was on the world stage, particularly on its neighbors and the US-led West, whether it was intended or not. Beijing proclaimed that the parade was showing a “peace-loving and responsible China.” Nevertheless, the widely asked question is what was the motivation behind such a massive show of Chinese military might – which included more than 160 aircraft and 580 active weapon systems, among them new fighter jets, bombers and tanks. The
China’s show of military might risks backfiring
Chinese scientists develop laser device that could track submarines
Researchers in eastern China say they have developed an airborne laser device that can detect underwater objects at unprecedented depths. The technology might one day be used to track submarines. The team from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics said the device could pick up objects more than 525 feet beneath the sea, twice as deep as devices used today. “It is the first time [to have reached that depth] … with potential for further improvement,” the institute said on its website. The airborne laser system was tested over the South China Sea in April and the results were made public this month. “It provides powerful technical support for satellite laser remote sensing,” the i
Chinese scientists develop laser device that could track submarines
China shows off its biggest guns for the first time
China publicly displayed its Dongfeng-41 missile for the first time on Tuesday as the country celebrated 70 years under Communist Party rule. With the ability to hit a target almost anywhere in the world, the Dongfeng (literally East Wind) missile is China’s most powerful nuclear deterrent to date. Decades in the making, the intercontinental ballistic missile was unveiled at a massive military parade on the anniversary of the People’s Republic’s founding, against a backdrop of intensifying strategic rivalry with the United States. The two countries have competing interests across the Indo-Pacific and remain locked in a bitter trade war and a race to dominate next-generation technologies. In
China shows off its biggest guns for the first time
Mystery weapon shown off – and then removed – in Chinese military video
China’s military published a video clip of what appeared to be the launch of a new type of supersonic cruise missile on Wednesday, only to withdraw the film and replace it with a version with that scene cut out. The original footage, which ran for just over a minute, was released on social media by the People’s Liberation Army Rocket Force as part of celebrations for the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China, which falls on October 1. China’s missiles are likely to be a big feature of the military parade in Beijing on the anniversary, with several of them going on public display for the very first time. The event will be closely watched as China has ramped up its
Mystery weapon shown off – and then removed – in Chinese military video
How Beijing is gearing up for an all-important anniversary
Two days ago, on Saturday afternoon, I was desperately hungry and looking for food in the heart of Beijing’s financial district.  But on a normally booming day for business, all the shops in the area had closed early in order to keep the crowds at bay. For the second weekend in a row, as the People’s Republic geared up to celebrate its 70th birthday on October 1, Beijing’s usually bustling central districts were quiet. The main roads leading to Tiananmen Square at the heart of the city were closed to normal traffic from Saturday morning and re-opened only on Monday morning. The usual cars, buses and taxis made way for military vehicles, including tanks, and floats practicing for a massive p
How Beijing is gearing up for an all-important anniversary
China shows off naval power with anniversary parade
China staged a huge naval parade on Tuesday to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese navy.  The leadership under Xi Jinping has embarked on a major military modernization campaign to boost the combat capability of Chinese troops. And the country's expanding naval power has unnerved neighboring governments that are engaged in territorial disputes with Beijing.  The parade, held in thick fog in the eastern port of Qingdao, featured new warships, nuclear submarines and the country’s first aircraft carrier.  Check out the gallery, above, to see the latest show of China’s power at sea. 
China shows off naval power with anniversary parade
The crown jewel of American fighter jets crashed in China’s backyard
When an American-developed F-35 fighter jet went missing on Tuesday minutes after it took off from an airbase in north-eastern Japan, several US military analysts reacted in alarm. This was a “big deal,” tweeted Thomas Moore, a former staffer at the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations. “There is no price too high in this world for China and Russia to pay to get Japan's missing F-35, if they can.” As China has ramped up its efforts to develop a fighter fleet to rival that of the US, the Chinese military has seen the F-35, the result of the most expensive weapons program in American history, as a model to match and to beat. There is no price too high in this world for China and Russia to pay
The crown jewel of American fighter jets crashed in China’s backyard