Chinese music

Chinese music

Why China’s hip-hop stars are staying silent on Black Lives Matter
After a 2017 rap show got a generation of China’s youth hooked on hip hop, the musical genre has created dozens of Chinese stars and, along with them, billions of streaming views. But despite their enthusiasm for a culture that originated in the African-American community, Chinese hip-hop stars and their legions of fans have largely stayed silent on the Black Lives Matter movement, which has swept across the world after the police killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, in Minneapolis. Canadian-Chinese hip-hop star Kris Wu has made no comments on the anti-racism protests to his 50.9 million social media followers on Weibo and 7.3 million on Instagram. GAI, a rapping competition winner
Beijing unveils plans to become ‘international music capital’ in 5 years
Beijing – China’s political, economic and cultural capital – has set an ambitious plan to become an “international music capital” by 2025. Wang Yezhen, an official with the Beijing Municipal Committee’s propaganda department, told Beijing Business Today on Tuesday that the city aimed to expand its music and creative industries to be worth more than $17 billion in five years. In 2017, the sector was about half that size, he was quoted as saying. Its proposal also called for the city to speed up development of its digital music industry, offer artists better copyright protections and build more small-scale venues for live music. “[Our research has shown that] the scope of the music industry is
Reality TV show highlights indie music in China
Following the massive success of The Rap of China, the country’s top video streaming company is trying to bring rock music to the masses. Since its launch in 2017 by Chinese streaming giant iQiyi, The Rap of China has become a cultural phenomenon, propelling previously underground rap culture to the mainstream and making stars out of several of its contestants. Other subcultures linked to hip hop – such as break dancing, graffiti and street fashion have also enjoyed a boom – and in 2018, iQiyi launched Hot Blood Dance Crew, a reality-TV street dance contest show produced by the same team behind the hiphop show, which recently returned for its third season. Chen Wei, the senior vice-presiden