Chinese national anthem

Chinese national anthem

March of the Volunteers is the national anthem of the People's Republic of China.  

In Hong Kong, a proposed law was added to the city’s mini-constitution – the Basic Law – in November 2017.

A National Anthem Bill is set to be tabled in early 2019.

China jails a video star. Her crime? Singing the national anthem.
At 21 years old, Yang Kaili is one of China’s biggest internet stars. First coming to fame live-streaming her singing, she was reportedly signed by a video site for $7 million (50 million yuan). This summer, she released her first record and performed on national television. Online, she racked up as many followers as the hottest YouTube channels. And she achieved all this in the span of a year. But her stardom and her budding singing career are now in tatters after a performance went wrong. Yang has been detained for five days and banished from video streaming sites where she had some 50 million followers combined. Her crime? Singing the Chinese national anthem in a “disrespectful” way while
China jails a video star. Her crime? Singing the national anthem.
Diss the national anthem? That’s up to three years in the slammer
If you protest during “The Star-Spangled Banner” in America, you get angry comments on social media or an angry tweet from the president. But if you do the same with China's “March of the Volunteers,” you may be jailed for up to three years. This penalty, implemented in mainland China last year, may now be coming to Hong Kong, a former British colony with a separate legal system. On Friday, the Hong Kong government formally presented this proposal to lawmakers, who are expected to pass it without difficulty. Tension between Hongkongers wanting greater democracy and the Chinese government has steadily risen in recent years. Protests against the Chinese national anthem in Hong Kong made intern
Diss the national anthem? That’s up to three years in the slammer