Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year holiday spending grew nearly 30% to US$127 billion
Despite the pandemic, Chinese consumers enjoyed a shopping and dining spree during this year’s Lunar New Year celebrations.  Sales increased to US$127 billion (821 billion yuan), a rise of almost 30% from 2020, but still below the 2019 record of $154 trillion (1 trillion yuan), government data showed.  With prevalent travel restrictions, many people spent more at retail stores, online outlets and restaurants.  China has continued to battle Covid-19 outbreaks in several provinces this year. As a result, the annual Lunar New Year mass migration home was severely disrupted after health authorities advised people from high-risk and medium-risk areas to avoid unnecessary travel and large gatherin
Chinese New Year: The Year of the Ox explained
The year 2021 is still young. But for the majority of Chinese people, the year has yet to start.  According to the traditional Chinese calendar, or lunar calendar, the new year begins on February 12, when the world will then formally enter the Year of the Ox.  For millennia, ancient Chinese people relied on a calendar system to calculate and record time, dates and years. At the core of these measures is the Chinese zodiac, a group of 12 animal symbols, each assigned to a new year that repeats every twelve years.   The twelve animals — Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig — appear in the same order, meaning we are in year two of a 12-year cycle.  L
Refined Chinese New Year dish is a nod to its humble beginnings
Poon choi is a staple dish for many people in China, and it is especially common during Chinese New Year.  Hong Kong’s Hyatt Regency Sha Tin executive chef Cheung Hong-man tells Inkstone how he refines the humble Cantonese dish. Was poon choi always a part of your village life? Growing up, poon choi was part of my heritage. In the early 1970s, Hong Kong was not so prosperous.  I remember rain dripped in and flooded the old houses. Back then, poon choi was common. My village wasn’t that big, just 100 to 150 people, but it’s been there for over 100 years. How did they prepare it?  You couldn’t just order out for food then. You called everyone in the village who knew how to cook to help out. 
Chinese New Year delights with a vegan twist
While Chinese New Year may be a more subdued affair this year, food will still play a central role – even for vegans.  For non-meat-lovers, the menu options to celebrate the Year of the Ox have become more interesting than ever, as chefs aim to create delicious and healthy vegetarian alternatives.  From festival casseroles and vegan poon choi to cakes and pastries, restaurants and food retailers have created an array of culinary delights.  Here’s the Inkstone rundown of some of the best offerings available for vegans. Traditional festive cakes Hong-Kong based retail grocery chain Green Common has developed three vegan Chinese New Year cakes, including turmeric and oat milk and chestnut ca
Chinese New Year good luck fruit is nutrition powerhouse
To the Chinese, kumquats are a symbol of good luck and prosperity and are an important feature of the Chinese New Year holiday.  But they also pack a powerful health punch.  The small orange citrus superfruit, a popular delicacy during Lunar New Year, are storehouses of nutrition, packed with antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and minerals. As more than a billion people in China and millions are around the world prepare to celebrate Lunar New Year, kumquats will be among the delicacies eaten, or given as gifts.  Kumquat trees adorned with red lai see fong (literally, good fortune envelopes) are auspicious decorations at the start of the Lunar New Year.  Native to China, the fruit is available ar
Pandemic fog hangs over Chinese New Year travel plans
Every year, we read headlines about the "world's largest human migration" when millions of Chinese people leave their places of work to head home and visit the family during the Lunar New Year.  But this year, a cloud hangs over the holiday period as China continues to battle sporadic outbreaks of Covid-19 across the country.  The 40-day travel season kicked off on Thursday, and the transport ministry estimated 1.2 billion trips would be made over the holiday period. But while that number sounds high, that number would be a 60% drop from 2019, underscoring the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.  The airport reported about a 50% drop in passenger traffic on Thursday compared with the usual
Cash and goodies for people to stay home during Chinese New Year
Chinese New Year is undoubtedly the most significant celebration on the Chinese calendar. This year though, company bosses have joined forces with local governments in dangling carrots of money and other gifts in front of residents in a desperate bid to encourage stay-at-home celebrations because of a recent spike in coronavirus cases.  Financial bonuses, shopping vouchers, movie tickets, free entry to local attractions and even food and decorations are just some of the incentives being used to deter what has been described as the world’s largest human migration. Each year, hundreds of millions of Chinese travel across the country – by train, bus and air – to reunite with family and friends
Lunar New Year festivities underway in China
With the Lunar New Year just days away, holiday activities and celebrations are getting underway in cities across China. People reuniting with families and friends will make about 3 billion trips by road, air and rail during what is also known as the Spring Festival in China. The highlight of the festivities will be the start of the Year of the Rat on Saturday, January 25, 2020, although fears of an outbreak of a new coronavirus have prompted travel restrictions and led to cancellations of public events in parts of the country.
China’s high-speed trains go ticket-less to aid New Year’s travelers
China’s peak holiday travel season, often billed as the “the world’s biggest annual human migration,” has just kicked off. The season usually begins about two weeks before the Lunar New Year's Day, which falls on January 25 this year, and lasts around six weeks. Also called the Spring Festival, the holiday is the most important time of the year for families to get together, eat huge amounts of food and grill single relatives about their romantic prospects. In order to ease the epic annual travel crunch – a massive 3 billion in total trips, compared to the relatively puny 55 million Americans who traveled last Thanksgiving – the country’s sole railway operator has introduced electronic ticket