Latest news, features and opinion on ethnic Chinese people overseas, including students studying abroad, the Chinese diaspora and the experiences of immigrants in countries such as the United States,

Canada, Australia and Britain and regions such as Southeast Asia.

Ferrari-driving Chinese patriots rev up protests in Canada
Convoys of Chinese patriots in Ferraris and other high-end sports cars have been revving up pro-Beijing demonstrations in Canada, home to tens of thousands of Chinese millionaire migrants. Drivers of luxury sports cars – which also included McLarens, Porsches and Aston Martins – waved Chinese flags, gunned their engines and honked their horns to cheers from pro-China demonstrators in Vancouver and Toronto, who were facing off against groups supporting the Hong Kong protest movement. In Vancouver, at the busy intersection of Broadway and Cambie Street, hundreds of rival demonstrators had gathered on Saturday afternoon at a major subway station. Protester Kevin Huang Yi Shuen, who supported th
Ferrari-driving Chinese patriots rev up protests in Canada
Inside the reggae empire built by a Chinese-Jamaican family
Almost five years ago on a local TV show in New York, the host was taken aback when the Jamaican reggae artist Gyptian was introduced by a diminutive, elderly Asian woman. “He was not expecting to see a Chinese woman talking about reggae,” Patricia Chin, now 82, recalls with a laugh, during a telephone interview from New York. But the half-Chinese, half-Indian Chin, who was born in Jamaica, knows just about everything there is to know about reggae.  She and her late husband, Vincent “Randy” Chin, helped build the nascent reggae music scene in the late 1950s from their home in Kingston, Jamaica, along with the likes of the legendary Bob Marley and Peter Tosh. In 1975, the Chins emigrated to t
Inside the reggae empire built by a Chinese-Jamaican family
Chinese traditions are no excuse for disinheriting daughters in British Columbia
The elderly Chinese immigrant came to the office of Vancouver lawyer Trevor Todd, a long-time neighbor, with plans to write his will. He brought with him his wife of 35 years – and the intention to disinherit her and their daughter, and instead leave the entire family fortune to the couple’s adult son. “I told him ‘forget it’,” said Todd last week, of the encounter 15 years ago.  Todd’s neighbor was hardly an outlier. Lawyers say sex-based disinheritance of Asian women is common in Canada, with wives and daughters sometimes “shafted” (to use Todd’s wording) by the will of a family patriarch. But the phenomenon is now under scrutiny, thanks to a high-profile multimillion-dollar court victory
Chinese traditions are no excuse for disinheriting daughters in British Columbia
He called us ‘the g-word’ and told us to go home
Social media is filled with uplifting stories of people who encounter racism and rise above it. People of color who wade through the mire to embrace or convert their tormentors – or, at least, distinguish themselves in the face of ignorance. They go low, we go high. This is not one of those stories. The facts of my encounter with a real-life racist in Vancouver, your honor, are as follows. On July 10, a random white man called my wife and me “gooks,” an awful thing to do. He followed us and told us to “go home.” I confronted him and he backed down. So far, so woke. Here are the bits I left out. They do not enhance my heroic tale. He was homeless, or looked it. He was pushing his belongings
He called us ‘the g-word’ and told us to go home
Serial child killer, cannibal, bogeyman – or scapegoat?
Si Quey Sae-ung’s reputation precedes him: notorious serial killer, vicious child murderer and ghoulish cannibal. Seen as evil personified in Thailand, the Chinese immigrant has become part of local folklore. He has been immortalized in films and books. He has also been a bogeyman for generations of children. For decades Thai parents have been warning their offspring that if they misbehaved, stayed out late or skipped school, Si Quey would come and eat their liver. Yet his embalmed corpse, in a small medical museum at Bangkok’s oldest hospital, doesn’t appear menacing at all. Si Quey’s preserved remains are on permanent display at the hospital’s Forensic Medicine Museum. Beside his corpse is
Serial child killer, cannibal, bogeyman – or scapegoat?
Lambo laundering: how Chinese cash fuels Canada luxury car scam
Chinese wealth and demand for luxury cars is fuelling a vast money laundering and tax avoidance scheme in Canada, involving thousands of fake local buyers of vehicles that are actually destined for China. According to a report commissioned by the British Columbia provincial government, the illicit gray market selling luxury cars to Chinese buyers had exploded in recent years. Under the scam, car dealers in British Columbia employed locally-based “straw buyers” to act as purchasers of luxury vehicles, who then exported the cars to the true buyers in China. By doing so, provincial sales taxes (PST) of up to 20% on luxury cars were dodged by the straw buyers, because products purchased for res
Lambo laundering: how Chinese cash fuels Canada luxury car scam
US colleges must stop admitting subpar Chinese students for the money
The bombshell revelations about a scheme by which wealthy parents in the US allegedly conspired to fraudulently get their children accepted into elite universities have opened the door to wider criticism of the injustices in university admissions. These include the ongoing debates about affirmative action, accusations of racism, and legacy admissions, among others. Yet this most recent scandal overshadowed another case that made headlines this month and which sheds light on another issue plaguing campuses: accusations of academic dishonesty among Chinese students in the US. When I enrolled in the University of Maryland’s agriculture program in 1950, I was one of just four Chinese undergradu
US colleges must stop admitting subpar Chinese students for the money
‘Speak English or go back to China’ is sad – and unsurprising
I had been mulling over a retort to “Go back to China!” since President Donald Trump took office in 2017. I didn’t have it by the time a friend shared with me screenshots of an email sent out by Dr. Megan Neely of Duke University to the Chinese master’s students in the university’s biostatistics department, telling them to stop speaking Chinese in the break room. The email said that two unnamed professors had come to her seeking to identify the Chinese students speaking “VERY LOUDLY” in Chinese in a school lounge. These students’ behavior, the two professors hinted, might compromise their internship and research opportunities. One professor from Duke University sent out an email asking Chine
‘Speak English or go back to China’ is sad – and unsurprising
‘Arrogant’ US denies Chinese neuroscientist a visa (again)
A Chinese neuroscientist who once held US citizenship has accused the US embassy in Beijing of arrogance after he was turned down for a visa – the latest in a series of denials he has experienced from the embassy. Rao Yi, the dean of Peking University’s School of Life Sciences, said he had been invited by the National Science Foundation (NSF), a US government agency based in Alexandria, Virginia, to attend a science workshop on July 23 and 24 in Washington. But his plans went awry when his visa application was rejected, possibly as a result of the tighter screening process introduced last month for Chinese academics and students in the fields of science and hi-tech manufacturing. “Most emba
‘Arrogant’ US denies Chinese neuroscientist a visa (again)
More and more, overseas Chinese fear the long arm of Beijing
When I received an invitation from the East–West Center to co-host a panel discussion during its International Media Conference last month in Singapore, on the current status of press freedom in China, I expected some confrontation from the audience. But I was certainly not prepared for what actually took place at the event. As the panel concluded, a woman in the audience, without raising her hand to request permission from the moderator to speak, started to shout at me: “What’s your nationality? Are you Chinese? What university did you study at?” The seemingly irrelevant questions baffled the audience. She then identified herself as a professor at one of the “top universities” in China, an
More and more, overseas Chinese fear the long arm of Beijing