Chinese overseas

Chinese overseas

Latest news, features and opinion on ethnic Chinese people overseas, including students studying abroad, the Chinese diaspora and the experiences of immigrants in countries such as the United States,

Canada, Australia and Britain and regions such as Southeast Asia.

China may not recognize special passport for Hong Kongers
Special passports held by some Hong Kongers may no longer be recognised in the mainland, Beijing threatened on Thursday. China’s reaction did not dampen the resolve of some Hong Kong residents to emigrate. Scholars, advocates and immigration consultants described the UK offer for British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) passport holders as more generous than expected, and Beijing’s comeback as largely symbolic. BN(O) passports were granted to Hong Kong residents born before Britain returned the former Chinese rule in 1997.   The British Home Secretary Priti Patel on Wednesday revealed that Hongkongers with BN(O) papers wishing to move to the UK would be exempt from its income threshold requireme
Quarantine hotel ‘acting like bandits’ in China
When Wu boarded a flight back to China in early June, he breathed a sigh of relief. The 25-year-old Chinese businessman had been stranded in Pakistan for more than three months due to coronavirus-related travel restrictions.  “I thought all would be good and right when I finally made it home,” said Wu, who asked for his name to be changed out of fear of retaliation by the authorities.  As soon as he landed in the eastern Chinese city of Jinan, Wu said, he and 180 other repatriated citizens faced a fresh set of ordeals: food poisoning and price-gouging from hotels. During their mandatory quarantine stay, the returnees from Pakistan were provided meals that were found to contain maggots, lady
Chinese students want to study in America more than anywhere else
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Index features one important number about China to give you insight into the rising power. 43%: the proportion of Chinese students who considered the United States as their favorite place to study overseas in 2019. The appeal of the American education system remained strong last year despite escalating tensions between Beijing and Washington, fueled in part by a trade war. In 2019, 43% of 6,200 Chinese students surveyed by New Oriental, a language test preparation company, said they would like to study in the US, citing high-quality education as their main reason. But while the US was the top destination, the pull of American schools has diminished compar
Fleeing coronavirus, overseas Chinese find haven at home
Desperate to return to his Beijing home from Boston, but fearful of catching the coronavirus in the confines of a plane, 26-year-old Liu began his journey with the assumption that all surfaces were covered in the virus. For his flights from Boston to Hong Kong, and then to Beijing over the weekend, the exchange PhD student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology put on two face masks, protective goggles, plastic gloves and a raincoat. After he arrived in the Chinese capital, he spent 10 hours going through stringent immigration and health checks. For Liu, who declined to use his full name, the nearly 30-hour long journey was worth it. “If something happens to me, I would rather be in Ch
She was brutally murdered in the US. Now her life is remembered in film
Zhang Yingying was 26 years old when she left China for the US as a visiting scholar to study climate change on crop yields in mid-2017. Just six weeks after she arrived in a new country, with its unfamiliar culture and language, Zhang disappeared, never to be seen again. In June that year, police arrested a former physics PhD candidate, Brendt Christensen, after surveillance footage showed that Zhang had entered a car driven by him. A jury later found him guilty of murder and he was sentenced to life in a federal prison. Prosecutors said he raped her and murdered her using a baseball bat and a knife. Zhang’s disappearance sent shockwaves through Chinese students in the US. Before Christense
Travel bans and racism deter Chinese students from studying overseas
The coronavirus outbreak will likely lead to a drop in Chinese students and tourists abroad, as Chinese citizens face entry bans and xenophobic attacks globally.  The epidemic has infected more than 110,000 people and killed more than 3,800 globally, most of them in China. Italy, Iran, Japan and South Korea have also been hit hard by the virus.  Although the spread of the virus has slowed in China, analysts say the travel restrictions imposed on Chinese travelers will have continuing effect on the education and tourism sectors worldwide.  In the United States, a Boston-based Chinese student agent said applications had dropped significantly following the virus outbreak, exacerbating an existi
Ferrari-driving Chinese patriots rev up protests in Canada
Convoys of Chinese patriots in Ferraris and other high-end sports cars have been revving up pro-Beijing demonstrations in Canada, home to tens of thousands of Chinese millionaire migrants. Drivers of luxury sports cars – which also included McLarens, Porsches and Aston Martins – waved Chinese flags, gunned their engines and honked their horns to cheers from pro-China demonstrators in Vancouver and Toronto, who were facing off against groups supporting the Hong Kong protest movement. In Vancouver, at the busy intersection of Broadway and Cambie Street, hundreds of rival demonstrators had gathered on Saturday afternoon at a major subway station. Protester Kevin Huang Yi Shuen, who supported th
Inside the reggae empire built by a Chinese-Jamaican family
Almost five years ago on a local TV show in New York, the host was taken aback when the Jamaican reggae artist Gyptian was introduced by a diminutive, elderly Asian woman. “He was not expecting to see a Chinese woman talking about reggae,” Patricia Chin, now 82, recalls with a laugh, during a telephone interview from New York. But the half-Chinese, half-Indian Chin, who was born in Jamaica, knows just about everything there is to know about reggae.  She and her late husband, Vincent “Randy” Chin, helped build the nascent reggae music scene in the late 1950s from their home in Kingston, Jamaica, along with the likes of the legendary Bob Marley and Peter Tosh. In 1975, the Chins emigrated to t
Chinese traditions are no excuse for disinheriting daughters in British Columbia
The elderly Chinese immigrant came to the office of Vancouver lawyer Trevor Todd, a long-time neighbor, with plans to write his will. He brought with him his wife of 35 years – and the intention to disinherit her and their daughter, and instead leave the entire family fortune to the couple’s adult son. “I told him ‘forget it’,” said Todd last week, of the encounter 15 years ago.  Todd’s neighbor was hardly an outlier. Lawyers say sex-based disinheritance of Asian women is common in Canada, with wives and daughters sometimes “shafted” (to use Todd’s wording) by the will of a family patriarch. But the phenomenon is now under scrutiny, thanks to a high-profile multimillion-dollar court victory
He called us ‘the g-word’ and told us to go home
Social media is filled with uplifting stories of people who encounter racism and rise above it. People of color who wade through the mire to embrace or convert their tormentors – or, at least, distinguish themselves in the face of ignorance. They go low, we go high. This is not one of those stories. The facts of my encounter with a real-life racist in Vancouver, your honor, are as follows. On July 10, a random white man called my wife and me “gooks,” an awful thing to do. He followed us and told us to “go home.” I confronted him and he backed down. So far, so woke. Here are the bits I left out. They do not enhance my heroic tale. He was homeless, or looked it. He was pushing his belongings