Chinese work culture

Chinese work culture

‘I felt naked’: Chinese worker claims she was gifted a surveillance cushion
A Chinese employee has complained of feeling “naked at work” after discovering that bosses were collecting data from her posterior without her knowledge. The administration employee, Wang, who worked for Hangzhou-based, high-tech company, Hebo Technology in China’s eastern Zhejiang province, was shocked and upset to learn that the ‘smart cushion’ her bosses had given her and nine other employees, supposedly for their wellbeing, was instead being used to monitor their behavior at work. The cushion even alerted her bosses when they were away from their desks. Using social media to voice her outrage, Wang said at first she had welcomed the ‘smart cushion,’ believing it was given to monitor the
Chinese company fines workers who take more than one bathroom break
A company in China has imposed a controversial rule by fining employees who take more than one bathroom break during their shift. The factory said it imposed the regulation to improve efficiency after discovering that some workers were spending time in the bathroom playing games on their phones or smoking cigarettes.  According to photos published online by disgruntled employees last week, the factory in the city of Dongguan, in the province of Guangzhou fined six workers US$3 for using the restroom twice during their eight-hour shift.  Another was fined for not registering her bathroom break on the company log. It’s not the first time that Chinese employers have been caught imposing strict
‘Touching fish’ becomes unusual work philosophy of China’s Gen Z
Young people in China have recently embraced new ‘unofficial’ laziness rules in the workplace to protest against a modern work culture they believe is far too demanding without sufficient rewards.  In a snub to China’s rat race and expectation to work long hours, Generation Z is calling on their comrades to start slacking off, or as they have dubbed it, “touching fish,” or “mo yu.” Among the rules for laziness are doing stretches in the office pantry, using the most toilet paper in the company and filling a thermos full of Chinese tea or whiskey as a desk-side companion, business news outlet Quartz reported. This philosophy of “touching fish” is borrowed from a Chinese proverb which states,
China's working moms still being held back
Motherhood is still a barrier to Chinese women in the workplace, a survey has warned.  Researchers questioned more than 8,000 professional women, and found that almost half (48%) took at least a year off work after giving birth with one in five becoming stay-at-home moms for several years.  "I never thought one day I would become a full-time mom, but it actually happened," said one woman, who was looking to get back to work after spending three years at home.  A third of the mothers admitted that their priorities had changed after giving birth, but just under 40% said they had little choice but to stay at home because the fathers were too busy at work.  Chinese women are legally entitled to
Shenzhen residents told to take time off to improve the city
Taking a day off in China can often be tricky. Peer pressure from colleagues and bosses often means workers stretch themselves to the breaking point, spending long hours in overtime or dragging themselves to work when they don’t feel well.  Shenzhen, the southern megacity in China, is trying to change the work culture by forcing companies to respect their employees’ mandated days off. The guidelines are part of a larger plan to improve Shenzhen’s living standards by fighting air pollution, improving food safety, and ensuring mental and physical health. The new ordinance will come into effect at the start of 2021. Under the section titled “healthy profession,” the rules stipulate that employ
Bad mood, long hours, crying babies: China’s crash course on remote work
For nearly a month, millions of people in China have had no choice but to work from home as authorities have locked down cities and restricted traffic to contain the coronavirus outbreak. It has been a jarring transition in a country where remote work policy is a novelty in many businesses. Mercer, an American human resources consultancy, said about half of the 516 companies it surveyed in China asked their employees to work remotely after restarting operation this month. “For many companies in China, this is the first time they had to experience that, without a remote working policy already in place,” said Renee McGowan, CEO of Mercer Asia. This has resulted in something of a shock experim
The icemen behind the world’s largest ice and snow festival
Each winter, about 100 workers toil on the frozen Songhua River in Harbin to harvest ice for the city’s famed Ice and Snow Festival, the largest of its kind in the world. The blocks will be moved to the capital of China’s northeastern province of Heilongjiang where they will be shaped into giant crystal palaces and sculptures at the event opening in early January. 
China hopes to attract foreign workers to its booming East
Foreign workers in China have long complained about the bureaucracy and paperwork involved in getting a working visa, but that may be about to change after the authorities unveiled plans to streamline the application process. A policy document released on Sunday outlined plans for a series of pilot programs to reduce the red tape as part of a project to boost the Yangtze River Delta region, which includes major commercial cities such as Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing. The plans, rubber-stamped by the Central Committee of the Communist Party and the State Council, aims to streamline work permit applications, permanent residency and employment for overseas workers. The plan aims to attract mo