Chinese work culture

Chinese work culture

Bad mood, long hours, crying babies: China’s crash course on remote work
For nearly a month, millions of people in China have had no choice but to work from home as authorities have locked down cities and restricted traffic to contain the coronavirus outbreak. It has been a jarring transition in a country where remote work policy is a novelty in many businesses. Mercer, an American human resources consultancy, said about half of the 516 companies it surveyed in China asked their employees to work remotely after restarting operation this month. “For many companies in China, this is the first time they had to experience that, without a remote working policy already in place,” said Renee McGowan, CEO of Mercer Asia. This has resulted in something of a shock experim
The icemen behind the world’s largest ice and snow festival
Each winter, about 100 workers toil on the frozen Songhua River in Harbin to harvest ice for the city’s famed Ice and Snow Festival, the largest of its kind in the world. The blocks will be moved to the capital of China’s northeastern province of Heilongjiang where they will be shaped into giant crystal palaces and sculptures at the event opening in early January. 
China hopes to attract foreign workers to its booming East
Foreign workers in China have long complained about the bureaucracy and paperwork involved in getting a working visa, but that may be about to change after the authorities unveiled plans to streamline the application process. A policy document released on Sunday outlined plans for a series of pilot programs to reduce the red tape as part of a project to boost the Yangtze River Delta region, which includes major commercial cities such as Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing. The plans, rubber-stamped by the Central Committee of the Communist Party and the State Council, aims to streamline work permit applications, permanent residency and employment for overseas workers. The plan aims to attract mo