Communist Party politics

Communist Party politics

The turbulent history of the Communist Party plays an integral role in China’s rise as a potential superpower.

Here’s why Beijing’s new Hong Kong envoy was a surprise choice
Bringing a political veteran with no relevant experience out of semi-retirement and making him the top envoy to Hong Kong shows Beijing’s determination to reset its policy on the city, according to insiders and observers. Luo Huining’s appointment as the new director of the central government’s liaison office in Hong Kong came as a surprise even to Communist Party insiders. But while he is seen as capable, he was an unlikely candidate for the job. Having turned 65 in October, Luo was supposed to be easing into semi-retirement. Under party rules, senior officials of Luo’s rank are relieved from key positions at the age of 65.  They are then transferred to less demanding roles – usually in Chi
Here’s why Beijing’s new Hong Kong envoy was a surprise choice
Why Xi Jinping wants everyone to know he ate on the train
Chinese President Xi Jinping is the kind of president who does not mind eating his dinner on the train and who shuns luxurious accommodation, according to the latest state media reports designed to portray him as a thrifty and frugal leader. The report by state news agency Xinhua published on Monday depicted him as a man who would spend his birthday working and personally intervened to ensure that meals in honor were not too extravagant. The report was also intended to reinforce the message to officials that staying down to earth was “no trivial matter” but was key to fulfilling the party’s “original mission” in what one analyst described as a Mao Zedong-style effort to show he was on the si
Why Xi Jinping wants everyone to know he ate on the train
Can China learn the lessons of a failed dynasty?
Are we finally seeing Pax Sinica 2.0, or is China engaging in a self-fulfilling prophecy that will lead to its doom (again)? Back in 2013, I wrote that China proffered a valid voice that would help maintain and shape the international order in its current form.  My 2015 book China, State Sovereignty and International Legal Order argued that China’s assertions and exercise of sovereignty should not be taken automatically as signs of aggression, or acts beyond the remit of international law, that would threaten world peace.  In turn, international law would moderate and influence China’s state behavior, both within its territory and in its relations with other states. Since then, President Xi
Can China learn the lessons of a failed dynasty?
Meet Chen Quanguo, Beijing’s hatchet man in Xinjiang
For Chen Quanguo, it was just a normal day at the office in China’s Xinjiang region on December 3. His agenda included chairing a study session on patriotism, a regular event for Beijing’s point man in suppressing what China calls a separatist and terrorist insurgency in the region bordering Pakistan and Afghanistan. “[We] must continue an extensive campaign on legal education and anti-extremism, to guide cadres and people of all ethnic groups to further strengthen their patriotic awareness,” says the official statement of his comments at the meeting. Some hours later and more than 6,500 miles away, Chen’s activities were very much on the mind of more than 400 US lawmakers waking up in Washi
Meet Chen Quanguo, Beijing’s hatchet man in Xinjiang
Beijing is struggling to recruit people to run Xinjiang
China’s Xinjiang autonomous region has attracted international attention for all the wrong reasons – police crackdowns and reports that local ethnic Uygur people are being held in internment camps.  What hasn’t gained much attention is the difficulty Beijing has drafting staff to execute its policies in the far northwest area. The measures targeting Muslim ethnic minorities in Xinjiang have triggered “widespread discontent among Han Chinese officials and citizens,” a source close to the central government told the South China Morning Post.  The source said Chinese President Xi Jinping was aware of the problem because he had been briefed by the country’s chief Xinjiang policy coordinator, Wan
Beijing is struggling to recruit people to run Xinjiang
Chinese patriots must also love the Communist Party, new guidelines say
Beijing has issued a new set of “patriotic education” guidelines, vowing to ramp up efforts to unite the country’s 1.4 billion population amid continuing social unrest in Hong Kong. Compared to the previous guidelines, published in 1994, the new framework goes a step further in emphasizing the role of the party in the country.  The new document explicitly defines patriotism as not just love of the country but also of the ruling Chinese Communist Party and its official political ideology. “The fates of the country and the party and socialism are inseparable,” the guidelines said, echoing previous remarks by President Xi Jinping. The guidelines, jointly issued by the Communist Party’s Central
Chinese patriots must also love the Communist Party, new guidelines say
Communist leader purged for opposing Tiananmen crackdown finally laid to rest
The late Chinese Communist Party leader known for his sympathy toward China’s student protesters in 1989 was finally allowed to have his tomb – 14 years after his death.  Former Communist Party general secretary Zhao Ziyang, who in 1989 opposed a military crackdown on the protests, was buried together with his wife on the outskirts of Beijing on Friday, a day after the 100th anniversary of Zhao’s birth.  Friday’s ceremony followed long, drawn-out negotiations between Zhao’s family and the party leadership over a burial site for the former leader, according to one of his sons, Zhao Erjun. Zhao was one of the leaders who pioneered China’s economic reforms, but his name is closely associated w
Communist leader purged for opposing Tiananmen crackdown finally laid to rest
Hong Kong protester shot on China’s National Day
A Hong Kong protester was shot in the chest with a live round fired by police, hours after the Chinese government celebrated the 70th birthday of Communist China with a massive parade.  Police officers and first-aid personnel were seen tending to the injured protester after he was shot in the late afternoon on Tuesday, the South China Morning Post reported. A police spokeswoman said an officer felt that his life was in danger when he fired one shot at his attacker.  In mainland China, October 1 saw an outpouring of patriotism, but in the former British colony of Hong Kong, anti-government protesters took to the streets for what they called a day of national mourning. The stark contrast is
Hong Kong protester shot on China’s National Day
China at 70 still isn’t a superpower
As China marks the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic on Tuesday, Beijing’s communist rulers have much to celebrate.  In the past few centuries, the country has never looked as strong as it does today, a consequence of the four-decade economic boom ushered in by the late leader Deng Xiaoping’s free market reforms and opening-up policy. In those 40 years, China has witnessed something of an economic miracle.  Nevertheless, China is still neither an advanced nor a developed country. Nor can it properly be described as a rich nation. It is a developing giant on the world stage. Just look at per capita income, arguably the best measure of a country’s personal wealth and it
China at 70 still isn’t a superpower
Chinese journalists to be tested on loyalty to Xi Jinping
Thousands of reporters and editors working in Chinese state media across the country will have to take an exam to test their loyalty to President Xi Jinping. Some will be asked to take part in “pilot tests” in early October, before the exams are held nationwide, according to a notice late last month from the media oversight office of the Communist Party’s propaganda department.  It did not say when the nationwide exams would be held. About 10,000 reporters and editors from 14 state-run online media outlets in Beijing are expected to sit the pilot tests using the Xuexi Qiangguo mobile app, a media source who requested anonymity said on Wednesday. Often compared to Chairman Mao’s quotation col
Chinese journalists to be tested on loyalty to Xi Jinping