Coronavirus outbreak: All stories

Coronavirus outbreak: All stories

An outbreak of a new strain of coronavirus was first reported in Wuhan, China. It has spread from mainland China through Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Cases have

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Tent hospital erected in Central Park as coronavirus deaths mount
As deaths from the coronavirus mount in New York City, a temporary field hospital has been built in Central Park to help ease the burden on local hospitals. Covid-19 cases continue to surge in the city, with the death toll surpassing 900 on Monday, March 30. Dr Anthony Fauci, the director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has estimated that about 200,000 Americans could die from the pandemic. US President Donald Trump has extended stay-at-home guidelines for the nation to the end of April. 
The coronavirus pandemic could change the way we look at masks
While mask-wearing has become a part of life in East Asia since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, it has remained rare in the United States and Europe. In some cases, mask wearers of Asian descent have been frowned upon or even assaulted. We look at the history of surgical mask use during disease outbreaks and how they have become shunned in the place where the practice originated: America.
The coronavirus may hasten the demise of the smartphone
We've all had those heart-stopping moments, “Where's my phone?!” Is it on the back seat of the taxi disappearing into traffic, or did I leave it at home? Maybe I haven't lost everything. For more than a decade, we have been tethered to a flat piece of metal and glass that is now central to our lives – combining communications (voice and text), photography, music, videos, news, web search and dozens of other seemingly essential apps into one indispensable device we have to carry everywhere. The smartphone hasn’t changed much since Apple revolutionized mobile telephones with a touch screen version in 2007. In fact, the decade of the 2010s saw only incremental innovations in smartphones, or gim
China wants people to get back to work. That may not be happening
China is facing a dilemma. The country is trying to get back to business after the extended Lunar New Year holiday amid fears that a mass movement of workers across the country will worsen the spread of the deadly coronavirus that has infected over 31,000 people. Allowing the workforce to return to their jobs is crucial both for sustaining economic growth and providing support to fight the outbreak, according to Lu Zhengwei, chief economist at the Industrial Bank in Shanghai. “It’s obviously desirable for employers who are now paying rent, salaries and social welfare for their employees, for nothing in return,” he said, adding that most small and medium enterprises in China could only last a
China can make 20 million masks per day. That’s not enough
China is experiencing a severe shortage of facial masks used to contain the spread of coronavirus, as surging demand has emptied shelves across the country and led to shortages from Tokyo to Toronto. The supply gap has been muddied by rampant panic buying, reports of government rationing and soaring prices. Even hospitals are appealing for donations, highlighting a worrying shortage amid an outbreak that the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared a global health emergency. The disease, which has killed at least 560 people and infected more than 27,000 in China, is spread primarily through droplets from coughs and sneezes and contact with infected surfaces, though researchers say it cou
Doctors strike back: Coronavirus fallout may provoke revolution of the professionals
The handling of the outbreak of the coronavirus in the central Chinese metropolis of Wuhan, and then its spread around the country and then the world, have been notable for many things. China’s response, which was late, and then overwhelming, quarantining overnight cities of more than 10 million people and constructing field hospitals in barely a week, displayed both the strengths and weaknesses of the party-state. The reaction of the rest of the world has been instructive as well, wary at first, perhaps out of fear of offending Beijing, before moving into high gear, with some countries trying to seal their borders with China by banning flights and keeping Chinese nationals out. But there ha
China reports bird flu outbreak that killed thousands of chickens
China has reported an outbreak of the deadly H5N1 bird flu in Hunan province, which lies on the southern border of Hubei province, the epicenter of the rapidly spreading coronavirus. The outbreak occurred on a farm in Shaoyang city where 4,500 of 7,850 chickens have died from the contagion, China’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said on Saturday. 17,828 poultry had since been culled, the ministry said in a statement. No human cases of the Hunan H5N1 virus have been reported. The Hunan H5N1 outbreak comes as the Chinese authorities continue to scramble to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, further stretching the nation’s public health resources. The deadly coronavirus ha
WHO declares coronavirus outbreak a global public health emergency
The World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global public health emergency over the spread of the Wuhan coronavirus on Thursday, citing the potential of the virus to spread to countries not prepared to deal with the contagion. Declaring the public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC), WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus emphasized multiple times during a press conference in Geneva that the move was not “a vote of no confidence” in China’s ability to control the outbreak. The latest PHEIC is only the WHO’s sixth since the UN agency was given the power to make such declarations in 2005. “Our greatest concern is the potential for the virus to spread to countries wit
Disabled boy dies after family quarantined for coronavirus
A disabled teenager in rural central China died after he was left at home for six days without care while his relatives were quarantined on suspicion of having the Wuhan coronavirus, the Beijing Youth Daily reported on Thursday. The 17-year-old, named Yan Cheng, had cerebral palsy, which is often caused by brain damage. He required around-the-clock care. The boy died in Hubei province on Wednesday, local government officials were quoted as saying. Authorities had launched an investigation, the report said. Cheng, his 49-year-old father and his 11-year-old brother traveled from Wuhan on January 17 to celebrate Lunar New Year in their ancestral village in Huahe township, Hongan county – about
Fear, and pride, for those building new coronavirus hospital in China
Felicity Feng, a Canadian visiting her parents in Wuhan over the Lunar New Year holiday, was caught up in the deadly coronavirus outbreak and the lockdown. Feng said her father was one of the project managers overseeing the construction of a new hospital for coronavirus patients.  Feng said she is worried about her father’s situation but is also glad that her family can contribute to the fight against the disease.