Corruption in China

Corruption in China

China Trends: woman punished for taking maternity leave, and a poor county’s luxury school
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. Asked to write 600 words an hour for maternity pay A furniture company in Shanghai has apologized after demanding that a woman who had taken maternity leave submit a daily handwritten report documenting her past sales.  The staff member was asked last week by Banmoo, her employer, to write 600 words per hour and send a report every day.  The company said it would fine her 50 yuan ($7.25) for each spelling mistake, 100 yuan (US$14.50) for each repetitive sentence, and 500 yuan (US$72) for each late or missing report. The
Chinese judge probed over alleged $3 billion family fortune
A provincial judge whose family reportedly controls a business empire worth $3 billion is being investigated by Chinese authorities in a case that has angered the nation. Zhang Jiahui, a deputy judge in the southern island province of Hainan, and her family were said to control 35 companies spanning industries from real estate to hotel management, the Chinese news website Knews reported on May 11. Reports of the Zhang family’s alleged fortune prompted anger online in a nation struggling to rein in corrupt officials who use the power of their office to amass wealth. “How can we transform to a market economy if our legislative power is in the hands of Zhang and her ilk?” a user commented on C
The stunning downfall of China’s internet tsar
Once the ruler of the world’s largest online citizenry, the life of former Chinese internet regulator Lu Wei is fast unraveling. Until he fell from grace, Lu was the former head of the powerful Cyberspace Administration of China, tasked with carrying out President Xi Jinping’s vision for a tightly managed internet. In 2015, Time magazine named him as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, the only Chinese official listed besides Xi. For a man who started his career in public service as a reporter for the state news agency Xinhua, Lu had a good run. He also had a shot to rise to the top brass of Chinese government. But that’s about where his good fortune ended. Lu left his role
China’s new anti-graft agency is running unchecked
The unbridled power and reach of China’s new anti-corruption super-agency has already exceeded the fears of lawyers and academics, just four months after the controversial system was introduced. When Beijing set up the National Supervisory Commission in March, the most contentious issue surrounding the new body was its power to detain anybody for investigation for a period of up to six months, without access to a lawyer. But a recent case in the central Chinese province of Hunan has exposed how the commission’s power could be used to deny all kinds of detainees access to legal counsel, even over unrelated offenses. The example has prompted lawyers and legal scholars to call for urgent offici
A former star politician admits to corruption
A disgraced Chinese politician who has been accused of plotting against the Communist Party pleaded guilty to corruption charges on Thursday.  Sun Zhengcai, 54, the former party chief of the southwestern megacity of Chongqing, was once considered to be a leadership contender who could succeed President Xi Jinping. But he was abruptly sacked and placed under investigation in July last year, three months before Xi was appointed the party chief for a second term. During the trial at the Tianjin No.1 Intermediate People’s Court, prosecutors accused Sun of using his position to seek profits for others and himself, illegally accepting $27 million worth of assets from 2002 to 2017, state-run Xinhua