Delivery man hit by car

Delivery man hit by car

A delivery driver on his dangerous profession
International Workers’ Day falls on May 1, and on this day we’re looking at one of China's fastest growing – and most dangerous – industries. Cao Rong is among the millions of online food delivery drivers in China. With a tap or two, consumers can get food delivered straight to them in China’s sprawling cities, often in 30 minutes or less. This $33 billion industry creates countless job opportunities for people like Cao – but it also puts lives at risk. With drivers rushing to take on more and more deliveries in order to make more cash, accidents are all too common. But when you’ve got a child to look after, sometimes the rewards are far more important than the risks.
A delivery driver on his dangerous profession
The tough, daring drivers behind China’s food delivery craze
The hole-in-the-wall noodle shop was packed on a weeknight. But as usual, no one was here to eat. Two servers behind the single counter were busy putting boxes of spicy pulled noodles doused liberally with hot oil into plastic bags, and taping on receipts with customers’ addresses. The group crowding around the counter weren’t customers, but couriers working for various food delivery apps in the southern megacity of Shenzhen. The only rest they get during their shift is when they wait for the food. The shop itself has no decoration. The tables are covered with ingredients and takeout boxes. A sticker on a shelf reads: “Delivery riders, you’ve had a long day!” But the outlet needs no accoutr
The tough, daring drivers behind China’s food delivery craze