Donald John Trump, born June 14, 1946, was inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States on January 20, 2017, after he defeated Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in the general election of 201

Show more
US Senate proposes spending $1 billion to fight Huawei’s 5G dominance
New legislation introduced in the US Senate on Tuesday aims to create a viable Western alternative to China’s telecoms giant Huawei and undercut the country’s dominance in global 5G networks. The lack of global alternatives to Huawei has been one of the biggest problems in Washington’s bid to counter Chinese strength in 5G networks – the faster and higher capacity fifth generation of telecommunication systems. The Senate bill tries to address that gap. If passed, it would spend more than $1 billion to bolster US competitiveness, allocate new spectrum and support research and development in the telecommunications industry. “We are at a critical point in history for defining the future of the
US Senate proposes spending $1 billion to fight Huawei’s 5G dominance
Revealed: China to make huge purchases of US goods in initial trade deal
This story is part of an ongoing series on US-China relations, jointly produced by the South China Morning Post and POLITICO, with reporting from Asia and the United States. China has agreed to make significant purchases of US goods as part of the phase one trade deal to be signed in Washington on Wednesday. The goods will total $200 billion over two years across four industries, according to a Trump administration official and two other sources briefed on the matter. Beijing has agreed to buy manufactured goods worth around $75 billion, $50 billion of energy, $40 billion of agricultural goods and $35 billion to $40 billion in services, the three sources said. Perhaps in reciprocation, the U
Revealed: China to make huge purchases of US goods in initial trade deal
Who’s that in the logo? Trademark case claims $30 million in damages
It is an image that is easy to find across China. A martial artist, wearing a yellow jumpsuit, is holding up his arms ready to attack or defend. You could be forgiven if you drove by and thought it was a picture of the kung fu star Bruce Lee. But technically, it is not. It is the logo of a famous Chinese fast-food chain called Real Kungfu.  The company has been using the logo for 15 years, but now it is facing a lawsuit from Bruce Lee’s family.  The lawsuit is the latest example in a series of trademark disputes between Chinese companies and international celebrities.  Bruce Lee Enterprises, run by Lee’s daughter Shannon Lee, is suing the restaurant chain for 210 million yuan ($30 million).
Who’s that in the logo? Trademark case claims $30 million in damages
Trump got 3 things right in China deal
Although the formal text of the US-China phase one trade agreement has yet to be released or signed, observers haven’t wasted a minute sharing their views. By far, the most controversial part has been the tariffs. Some believe the agreement was not worth the harm and uncertainty caused by the tariffs – many of which will remain in place, at considerable cost to US businesses, workers and consumers. Others say the escalating tariffs were instrumental in bringing the 18-month dispute to a successful partial conclusion. The tariffs certainly played a role, but three other factors were critical. First, in the final stages of the trade talks, the United States made important compromises. Usually,
Trump got 3 things right in China deal
A tech dispute that is bigger than the US-China rivalry
The White House and Beijing have reached an agreement on a “phase one” trade deal with most of the last-minute attention focused on agricultural purchases and tariff reductions. Among the key structural issues that may not have been adequately addressed is Washington’s concern about theft of intellectual property rights, which, according to President Donald Trump, costs the nation $600 billion annually, an accusation denied by China. Many in America’s security establishment also see China’s aggressive actions as part of broader efforts to erode America’s great power status. Thus, the transfer of technology to China is viewed not only on its commercial merits but also as a potential national
A tech dispute that is bigger than the US-China rivalry
The US and China cannot afford to go their separate ways
In the past couple of decades, nothing has been as prominent in remaking the global economy and reshaping global geopolitics as China’s rise and globalization. China’s accession into the World Trade Organization in 2001 – the landmark inception of the world’s most populous nation into the global capitalist system – drove both China’s explosive growth and economic globalization. In the past year, however, a completely different theme has come to the foreground: decoupling.  Many in Washington fear or suggest that China and the United States, the world’s two largest economies, might go their separate ways, due to fundamental divergences in their philosophy on economics, governance and politics
The US and China cannot afford to go their separate ways
US has the upper hand in ideological rivalry with China. The problem: Trump
The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act and the US Congress’ 150-odd other pieces of China-related legislation underscore elder statesman Henry Kissinger’s recent assertion that the US and China are “in the foothills” of a new cold war. Perhaps we’re even further up, above the tree line. As recriminations beget more recriminations and new fronts in the ideological battle seem to open every week, Washington’s wannabe cold warriors need to pause and reassess. The non-stop news around the advance of the Hong Kong act and the stand-off at Polytechnic University last week obscured new data released by the Institute of International Education and the State Department showing that the number o
US has the upper hand in ideological rivalry with China. The problem: Trump
‘Comrade Trump’ hailed for spurring reforms in China
US President Donald Trump may have his critics in China, but some internet users have suggested, albeit sarcastically, that he has been a positive force for the country.  They joke that he is acting as a catalyst for much-needed reforms. In social media circles and even on some academic forums, the American leader earned the nickname Comrade “Chuan Jianguo,” which translates as “Trump Building the Nation.”  The backhanded compliment stems from the assumption that, by starting a trade war with China, Trump unwittingly forced the country into a program of domestic reforms to counter its impact. Such is people’s familiarity with the nickname that Wang Manchuan, head of the public administration
‘Comrade Trump’ hailed for spurring reforms in China
Publisher warns of ‘fictional’ expert in Trump advisor’s anti-China book
President Trump’s trade adviser Peter Navarro faked an expert in his anti-China books, and the volumes’ publisher wants readers to know it. All reprints of Navarro’s supposedly non-fiction Death by China will “alert” readers that the Harvard-educated economist Ron Vara quoted within its pages is fabricated, according to Pearson, which owns the book’s publisher Prentice Hall. The 2011 book, which levels a laundry list of accusations against China’s trade practices, including deliberately harming Americans with dangerous consumer goods, came under renewed scrutiny this week following a report that one of its sources does not exist. The move follows a report by The Chronicle Review citing Death
Publisher warns of ‘fictional’ expert in Trump advisor’s anti-China book
Trial of alleged Mar-a-Lago intruder begins with underwear snafu
The trial of a Chinese woman who allegedly lied her way into President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort began on Monday with a bizarre exchange. US prosecutors have accused Yujing Zhang, a 33-year-old Chinese national, of lying to federal officers and trespassing on Trump’s Florida resort in March amid rising trade tensions between the two countries and spying fears. On Monday morning, Zhang appeared at the Fort Lauderdale federal courthouse dressed in brown prison garb. Defendants are usually advised to wear civilian clothes to prevent prejudicing a jury. When a judge asked about her outfit, Zhang said, in Mandarin, that the jail had not given her any underwear. “You have no undergarments in your
Trial of alleged Mar-a-Lago intruder begins with underwear snafu