Education in China

Education in China

Teacher warms her audience with ‘tasteless’ winter dressing tips
A Chinese teacher is telling her students to embrace ugly fashion, and in doing so has found herself the subject of praise from parents who need help convincing their children to layer up in “tasteless” undergarments.  The warm-hearted” teacher, Cheng, from the Yuhua Experimental Middle School in Kaifeng, a city in the central Chinese province of Henan, made the instructional video after discovering that some of her students were not wearing long johns under their clothing during the sub-zero temperatures the region was experiencing. Commonly worn across China on blisteringly cold winter days, the long johns – or long johns as they are known in the country’s northern provinces and mianmaoku
‘Children’s safety comes first’: why China’s parents are choosing schools close to home
International schools in China are riding a wave of popularity as cautious parents prioritize the safety of their children over education. As the coronavirus pandemic continues to wreak havoc globally – with many countries continuing restrictive lockdowns to stop the spread of the disease – and many students studying abroad forced to return home – Chinese parents are now seeking alternatives to sending them abroad for a western-style education.  “Parents always put their children’s safety as first priority, followed by an academic level of the schools,” said Wu Yue, founder and chief executive of New School Insight (NSI) Media. As a result, international schools in China are now seen as the
China's guide to ending abuse of students in college
China’s education department issued a new regulation on November 11 banning postgraduate tutors from having “improper” relations with students to prevent instances of exploitation.  Postgraduate tutors are often treated as guiding mentors, or even employers, by students who face immense pressure to achieve high marks in China’s notoriously high-pressure academic culture. The relationship dynamic has resulted in sexual misconduct or bullying from teachers, and in some cases resulted in the student committing suicide.  The directive banned tutors from the following violations, among others: Humiliating their students Using their students to apply for research grants Willfully postponing stud
China has a plan to help its children get more exercise
China is to put greater emphasis on physical education in its high-school entrance exam in an effort to push schools and parents to ensure children get more exercise. It follows repeated warnings that Chinese children have high levels of obesity and poor eyesight, with physical education often neglected in China’s primary and middle schools in favor of academic subjects. Last month, the education ministry announced plans to give sports a higher weighting in the nation’s high-school entry exam, the zhongkao, putting it almost on a par with academic subjects such as Chinese, math and English. The zhongkao already includes a score for sports, but gives it very low weighting compared with other
China Trends: remnants of a sacked palace, and athletics become part of entrance exams
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. A reminder of past humiliation Every Chinese schoolchild knows the story of the Old Summer Palace. The palace was built throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries and featured a beautiful staircase leading into the main entrance overlooking a lavish garden. Located on Beijing’s outskirts, it was the perfect retreat for Chinese emperors looking for a respite from the bustling capital. In 1860 it was burned to the ground and looted by French and British troops during the Second Opium War. It has become a source of nati
Mongolians fear loss of languages as China pushes Mandarin
China’s new language policy for schools in Inner Mongolia sparked rare protests and class boycotts in the region as locals fear the rules will suffocate their culture. Some parents have been threatened with layoffs, fines, and their children’s expulsion from school if they refuse to send their kids back to school. 
China's toughest test just got harder
Last Tuesday was the most anticipated opening day of a new term for Yin Shirui, a high school student in Ganzhou, in the eastern Chinese province of Jiangxi. It came about two months later than usual because of the coronavirus pandemic. For final-year high school students in nine Chinese provinces, last week marked their return to campus after an extended winter holiday and weeks of online learning at home. “I don’t like learning on the internet at all. I stayed at home alone for most of the day, from morning until late in the afternoon,” Yin, 17, said. “I am not interested in what is taught in online class because the teachers there do not target me, or my class. They target the whole grad
Travel bans and racism deter Chinese students from studying overseas
The coronavirus outbreak will likely lead to a drop in Chinese students and tourists abroad, as Chinese citizens face entry bans and xenophobic attacks globally.  The epidemic has infected more than 110,000 people and killed more than 3,800 globally, most of them in China. Italy, Iran, Japan and South Korea have also been hit hard by the virus.  Although the spread of the virus has slowed in China, analysts say the travel restrictions imposed on Chinese travelers will have continuing effect on the education and tourism sectors worldwide.  In the United States, a Boston-based Chinese student agent said applications had dropped significantly following the virus outbreak, exacerbating an existi
‘Ass-kissing’ research paper triggers discussion on academic misconduct in China
A research paper filled with praise for the author’s supervisor was met with a wave of ridicule and anger online in China’s latest academic scandal. The paper published in the Journal of Glaciology and Geocryology seven years ago suddenly went viral last week, after some internet users posted screenshots of the article on social media.  Many people were shocked to find that the article on ecological economics was actually filled with extravagant praise for the author’s supervisor Cheng Guodong and Cheng’s wife Zhou Youfen.  Cheng was also the chief editor of the Journal of Glaciology and Geocryology.  The 35-page paper by Xu Zhongmin, a specialist in frozen ground and permafrost with the sta
Charity for girls comes under fire for funding boys
A Chinese government-run charity aimed at helping poverty-stricken girls finish their schooling has prompted an online outcry after it was found to be funding boys’ education as well.  Despite a growing awareness of gender equality in urban China, girls, especially those in rural areas, still lag behind in their access to education due to long-held favoritism toward sons. To help provide education for poor girls, the state-run China Children and Teenagers’ Fund launched the Spring Bud Project in 1989.  The project’s promotional materials have almost entirely featured women, and China’s first lady, Peng Liyuan, is the charity’s special ambassador. But social media users found this week that a