Ethnic minorities in Hong Kong

Ethnic minorities in Hong Kong

Hong Kong’s non-Chinese ethnic minorities form a vibrant and colourful community comprising both new immigrants and those who have lived in the city for generations.

 

How comedy and protests helped me find my Hong Kong identity
“Get lost gweilo!” says the old man. I firmly respond, “How dare you call me gweilo! Be respectful and call me ah-cha!”  If you got this joke, then you have a local understanding of racism in Hong Kong.  (For those who don’t get it, gweilo is a Cantonese term for white people while ah-cha refers to South Asians.)  I’m an Indian made in Hong Kong. And because I was born and raised here, my parents felt it was vital that I learn the local language of Cantonese. They wanted me to better integrate into society and avoid the limitations they faced due to their own language barrier. It seemed like a simple formula: Learn the language, become a local, everybody’s happy.  However, as we realized in
Meet Hong Kong’s first Indian social worker
Jeffrey Andrews is the first Hongkonger with Indian roots to become a qualified registered social worker in the city. Andrews says he decided to serve his community out of frustration about his experiences with discrimination, and his first-hand look at how ethnic minorities are treated in Hong Kong despite its claim to be a global city. A decade into his career, Andrews remains a proud Hongkonger, using his fluent Cantonese and unique perspective to work with refugees from the Christian Action drop-in center based in the city’s notorious Chungking Mansions. The warren of shops, cheap guesthouses and eateries is where Andrews used to mingle with gang members in his wilder years growing up in