The British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997, assured freedoms for 50 years. The clock is ticking.

One in three Hongkongers are traumatized amid unrest, study says
More than 2 million, or almost one in three, adults in Hong Kong have shown symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder during the prolonged civil unrest in the city, a study published in a leading medical journal has found. The number was six times higher than four years ago, just after the pro-democracy Umbrella Revolution protests had ended. Researchers urged the government to step up its mental health provisions. The research, conducted by the University of Hong Kong, also suggested that up to 11% of the city’s adult population was affected by probable depression last year, five times higher than the figure collected from 2009 to 2014, when it was just 2%. The research, published in an ar
One in three Hongkongers are traumatized amid unrest, study says
Here’s why Beijing’s new Hong Kong envoy was a surprise choice
Bringing a political veteran with no relevant experience out of semi-retirement and making him the top envoy to Hong Kong shows Beijing’s determination to reset its policy on the city, according to insiders and observers. Luo Huining’s appointment as the new director of the central government’s liaison office in Hong Kong came as a surprise even to Communist Party insiders. But while he is seen as capable, he was an unlikely candidate for the job. Having turned 65 in October, Luo was supposed to be easing into semi-retirement. Under party rules, senior officials of Luo’s rank are relieved from key positions at the age of 65.  They are then transferred to less demanding roles – usually in Chi
Here’s why Beijing’s new Hong Kong envoy was a surprise choice
China’s new top official in Hong Kong hopes city will 'get back on track'
China’s new top representative to Hong Kong says he hopes the city will “get back on track” soon in his first address to media after his surprise appointment over the weekend.  Luo Huining, 65, the former Communist Party leader of the northern province of Shanxi, has never held any position directly related to Hong Kong before. He is the newly appointed director of the central government’s liaison office in the city.  Hong Kong has been in the grip of protests since June 2019, sparked by a now-withdrawn extradition bill before morphing into a wider anti-government campaign that has been marked by mass rallies and often-violent clashes. Meeting reporters on his first day at work on Monday, Lu
China’s new top official in Hong Kong hopes city will 'get back on track'
Hong Kong artists celebrate distinctive rural village life
There’s a picturesque, historic village in northeastern Hong Kong that was once a flourishing community. More than 300 years old, Lai Chi Wo used to be one of the more affluent villages in the area. It was home to the Hakka ethnic group, who migrated from northern China to the south of the country hundreds of years ago. The Hakka – whose name means “guest families” – is a major group in the global Chinese diaspora. By the 1950s, however,  the village had become so poor that parents could not afford to send their children to school. So, like other indigenous villagers in rural Hong Kong, they migrated to work in restaurants in Britain and Germany, and later set up their own shops. Artist Eve
Hong Kong artists celebrate distinctive rural village life
This ex-bodyguard is making a killing thanks to Hong Kong unrest
Months of violent protests have landed a heavy blow to businesses in Hong Kong. But for Clement Lai, a former elite bodyguard, the unrest has been a boon. His private security firm has been in high demand as the anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong have intensified, underscoring the increased volatility of the unrest and fears of violence in the Asian financial center. Formerly a close protection officer in the Hong Kong Police Force’s VIP protection unit, Lai was responsible for the personal safety of visiting Chinese leaders including President Jiang Zemin and then Vice-President Hu Jintao, as well as overseas dignitaries such as US President Bill Clinton. He set up Clement Shield i
This ex-bodyguard is making a killing thanks to Hong Kong unrest
2019 in review: The told and untold stories of China
Part of what inspires someone to read Inkstone every day is a desire to understand China — one of the most complex, and often contradictory, countries in the world. As 2019 comes to a close, we believe the year was defined by extremes of these inspirations and disappointments.  The one defining story for China in 2019 also happens to be one of the biggest stories in the world, period. When people write a history of 2019, they will begin with the protest movement in Hong Kong. On June 9, hundreds of thousands of people filled the streets of Hong Kong to demonstrate against a bill that would have allowed criminal suspects to be transferred to mainland China. At the time, we did not know that i
2019 in review: The told and untold stories of China
To win over Hong Kong and Taiwan, Xi Jinping must break a 2,000-year tradition
China’s “one country, two systems” formula in Hong Kong is failing miserably. After more than six months of large-scale pro-democracy protests – including violent clashes with police – the city’s voters dealt a powerful blow in November to pro-mainland parties, which lost 87% of seats to pro-democracy rivals in district council elections.  The significance of that election should not be underestimated. While district councils have little power, they select some of the 1,200 electors who choose Hong Kong’s chief executive. In the next election, pro-democracy parties will fill nearly 10% of those seats. The election also had important symbolic implications. District councils are elected in a
To win over Hong Kong and Taiwan, Xi Jinping must break a 2,000-year tradition
Can Beijing’s golden child be more than the world’s casino capital?
Macau-born graphic designer Cheang Chi-wai remembers starting high school after the Portuguese colony was returned to China on December 20, 1999. The 31-year-old was taught the Chinese national anthem, attended regular flag-raising ceremonies, and was reminded constantly that he was Chinese and had to learn to love the motherland. “Before the handover, I had absolutely no sense of my identity,” Cheang said. The Portuguese were in control of Macau since 1557, but acted mainly as administrators in the decades before the city’s return to China.  Their colonial rule had been weakened significantly by a communist-fomented riot in December 1966, which left real political power largely in the hands
Can Beijing’s golden child be more than the world’s casino capital?
What to do with Hong Kong’s lost generation
A good friend was waiting at a bus stop in Wanchai, Hong Kong the other day while crowds of people milled past on their way to lunch. Listening to the chatter around him, he made an interesting observation. All the older people were talking about the crazy rioters and how they had wreaked terrible and unnecessary destruction on public property in Hong Kong. In the cold light of day, the senseless devastation is reminiscent of a war zone. The younger commuters were chatting about the many videoed instances of dazed demonstrators lying on the ground being kicked in the head by a reinforced police boot and the government’s lack of support for Hong Kong people. It has been a battle between a ra
What to do with Hong Kong’s lost generation
‘I had to do something’: The overseas protesters who join Hong Kong’s demonstrations
Months of anti-government protests in Hong Kong have made headlines around the world. While images and stories have struck a chord with people overseas, some have been inspired to fly thousands of miles to Hong Kong to take part in demonstrations.  The South China Morning Post met two Americans who said they felt compelled to come to the city to participate in the movement as US lawmakers considered – and later passed – legislation aimed at ensuring the “sufficient autonomy” of Hong Kong from Beijing.
‘I had to do something’: The overseas protesters who join Hong Kong’s demonstrations